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Interior paint question

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  • Member since
    February, 2019
Interior paint question
Posted by Rmjtools on Tuesday, February 05, 2019 10:25 AM

New guy here with some really basic questions on a kit I’m starting. This is my first build in about 40 years so I will definitely be asking beginner stuff. For my first return to plastic build I had a Eduard I-16 fighter in 1/48. I’m doing the fuselage and the question is when you paint the interior sidewalls prior to assembling the 2 halves, what do you do about the paint on the gluing surface? I see lots of builds in FSM and I see that all the time. Do you guys sand off the paint? Just assemble with the paint? How do you prevent damage if you sand it? Also, when attaching the small part to the interior, do you just glue those over the paint? 

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by JonRM on Wednesday, February 06, 2019 2:05 PM

Depending on how much paint it is, I keep on going. There is enough surface to adhere the glue to even with a small amount of paint.

If paint is quite a lot, I use the flat edge of a model knife and scrape the paint down to plastic. That way it does not remove that much of the form or plastic at all.

 

-Jon

 

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Wednesday, February 06, 2019 5:39 PM

When you assemble the two fuselage halves,you are glueing them from the outside,correct ? All you are doing is joining the halves and running the glue down the seam from the outside,the paint inside should be intact,at any rate,it shouldnt be visible inside the fuselage.

As far as glueing small painted parts,I don't remove glue,the weld type glues will dissolve a small amount of paint when applied anyway,if too much comes off,just touch it up.Hope I am being clear.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, February 06, 2019 6:08 PM

I like to do as much assembly as I can before painting... cockpit tub or floor, sidewalls, etc. in sub assemblies. Then I’ll paint them up. Afterwards I’ll remove any paint from mating surfaces with sanding sticks or needle files as needed. Occasionally I’ll use super glued or other non solvent type adhesives if need be. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by Rmjtools on Wednesday, February 06, 2019 6:17 PM

There is a small crude tub on this build. This model has a big enough gap in the bottom where the wing goes that I can install the tub and instrument panel after the halves are glues together. I like that as it will allow me to get the seam real tight.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, February 06, 2019 6:21 PM

stikpusher

I like to do as much assembly as I can before painting... cockpit tub or floor, sidewalls, etc. in sub assemblies. Then I’ll paint them up. Afterwards I’ll remove any paint from mating surfaces with sanding sticks or needle files as needed. Occasionally I’ll use super glued or other non solvent type adhesives if need be. 

 

Ditto

For pre-painted small parts, use superglue or Elmer's. Do not use superglue anywhere close to clear parts. It will fog them and ruin them. I've even had this happen to a cockpit canopy while I was gluing in landing gear from underneath. Dipping the clear parts in gloss clear acrylic like Fuiture Floor Finish helps, but is no guarantee.

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by Rmjtools on Wednesday, February 06, 2019 6:22 PM

I am going to do exactly that with the fuselage. There were only 5 small pieces to be glued on the sidewalls and I did that before paint and then brush painted them. I did get a bottle of Zap plastic glue just for attaching the small parts over paint. The only issue was it wouldn't kick off without Zip Kicker and it was a tiny piece so it was hard holding it with one hand and then trying to find the kicker with the other hand. Jeez some of those parts are small!

  • Member since
    November, 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Thursday, February 07, 2019 5:50 AM

Painted mating surfaces I've always just scraped the paint away with an x acto knife. I can remember doing that as far back as when I was probably 11 yo ( I'll be 69 in April this year). It's an acquired skill where you use the blade cutting edge sliding it backwards as a scraper rather than into the cutting edge as a cutter and using the thumb as a guide. Works pretty good imo.

If you use solvent/weld glues like Testors it will melt the paint and it just becomes part of the bond as has been mentioned already. I usually scrape it anyway, my wild imagination thinks it must be a better bond that way but I have 0 proof of that.

  • Member since
    March, 2015
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, February 07, 2019 9:47 AM

Also, don't forget to scrape away the chromed finish of chromed parts at the mating surface. You will get a stronger bond between the parts.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, February 07, 2019 10:03 AM

JohnnyK

Also, don't forget to scrape away the chromed finish of chromed parts at the mating surface. You will get a stronger bond between the parts.

 

You will not have any bond if you use a solvent plastic cement and do not remove chrome plating from the mating surface. Once the glue evaporates... CA glues on the other hand will work, chrome to chrome, no removal necessary.

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

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