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White / Flesh brushed on is very thin

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  • Member since
    February, 2019
White / Flesh brushed on is very thin
Posted by JonRM on Monday, February 25, 2019 8:41 AM

This is more a question than anything. I have some of the figures that go with my models and rather than use an airbrush for such a small amount of paint needed, I use a brush.  When I do, it takes 3 or more coats for white or flesh colors to start to take any real color tones. They are almost translucent. WHen they finally take on some color they also look flakey for lack of a better description. The paint is not smooth at all. I have them thinned down, and not thinned. still smae results.

 Am I missing something when brushing these colors, or is it just a quirk of the paint?

-Jon

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, February 25, 2019 8:45 AM

It would be helpful to know what kind of paint you are using and describe how you are thinning it.

-Greg

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, February 25, 2019 8:51 AM

I  find priming helps if the figure is molded in dark plastic.  I am doing some 1:96 figures molded in white plastic, using MM enamel radar tan.  It is covering fine with one coat (hand brushed) on flesh areas.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by JonRM on Monday, February 25, 2019 8:55 AM

Greg,

 I have used primarily Vallejo Model Air and Tamiya x and xf paints. All acrylics. Vallejo usually do not need thinned, but I did use a small amount of Testers acrylic thinner for testing (20% thinner, 80% paint) to try that.

For Tamiya I use xf-1 and x-1 both and the X-20A thinner with that in a 40% thin, 60% paint. if I thin it at all. Usually only thin for airbrush use, but tried this thinned again for same reason as Vallejo to see if it was a paint thickness issue.

-Jon

 

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by JonRM on Monday, February 25, 2019 8:59 AM

Thanks Don,

  I did for get to mention that I use a base coat, its not a dedicated prime but a Flat Black, NATO Black or flat white depending oin the colors Im using. Not sure if that would be the problem or not, not using a dedicated primnerpaint.  but I dont paint direct to plastic. I learned that lesson a long time ago, it looked horrible....:)

-Jon

 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Monday, February 25, 2019 9:14 AM

The Vallejo model air is meant for airbrushing, you might find its to thin for brush painting. I use vallejo model colour mostly on my figures and busts, with some Tamiya and Scale 75 for the flesh. I prime them black then build up the flesh colours and don't have any issues with coverage.

Tamiya can be a pain when brush painting, especially their lighter colours.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Aifix 1/72nd Gladiator Mk II & Mosquito Mk VI.

  • Member since
    February, 2019
Posted by JonRM on Monday, February 25, 2019 9:27 AM

Bish

The Vallejo model air is meant for airbrushing, you might find its to thin for brush painting. I use vallejo model colour mostly on my figures and busts, with some Tamiya and Scale 75 for the flesh. I prime them black then build up the flesh colours and don't have any issues with coverage.

Tamiya can be a pain when brush painting, especially their lighter colours.

 

 

Thank you. Thats what I was affraid of. Looks like I will be looking for a different set of paints for brushing figures. My LHS has 2 and 3 bottle kits for figures, might try one of those this time around..

Thanks again.

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, February 25, 2019 9:30 AM

Bish
The Vallejo model air is meant for airbrushing, you might find its to thin for brush painting.

Bish is right, but his comment may be a bit understated.  Vallejo Model Color, on the other hand, might delight you for figure painting.

I don't hand paint Tamiya so can't comment on that, sorry.

Thank you for providing more details, very helpful.

-Greg

  • Member since
    January, 2019
Posted by Edwin on Monday, February 25, 2019 9:47 AM

I do find that when hand brushing Tamiya acrylics, their paint retarder is almost a must, otherwise it becomes a bit of a gummy mess. The alternative is to thin it heavily, but then, that becomes almost like a wash. For hand brushing, I very much prefer to go with enamels. 

For figures, after a light primer coat so as not to lose detail, I like to airbrush on the base flesh color first. Subsequent layers for highlights and shadows are heavily thinned enamels, slowly building up the color. I find that keeps the finish a bit smoother. 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, February 25, 2019 4:41 PM

JonRM

Thanks Don,

  I did for get to mention that I use a base coat, its not a dedicated prime but a Flat Black, NATO Black or flat white depending oin the colors Im using. Not sure if that would be the problem or not, not using a dedicated primnerpaint.  but I dont paint direct to plastic. I learned that lesson a long time ago, it looked horrible....:)

-Jon

 

 

Yes, that does make a difference.  Whenever I use a primer or base coat, I use a very light color if I will be painting light colors over it, dark under dark.  Makes life easier.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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