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Beginner question

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  • Member since
    November, 2012
Beginner question
Posted by Blaine on Sunday, March 17, 2019 7:37 PM

I'm sure this has been asked, but I just haven't been able to find the answer. With base colors, or any color for that matter, is there anything wrong with using regular spray can enamal and de-canning it? Or for that matter a standard enamal paint? 

Life is not about getting out of the storm, but learning to dance in the rain.

Don't tip to through life only to end up at deaths door. 

VS 82, VP40, VP31 

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, March 17, 2019 8:10 PM

I have decanted spray paint before and it's very thin for brush painting but can be airbrushed.  

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, March 17, 2019 8:32 PM

Blaine

I'm sure this has been asked, but I just haven't been able to find the answer. With base colors, or any color for that matter, is there anything wrong with using regular spray can enamal and de-canning it? Or for that matter a standard enamal paint? 

 

No. It’s your choice what you want to do. 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, March 18, 2019 9:13 AM

The only thing I know of that is special about model paints is that some brands use more finely ground pigments than most hardware store paints.  However, for clear coats, either gloss or flat, I have used gloss clear enamels, lacquers and polyurethanes. 

If a model does not have really finely molded detail, hardware store paint of any kind is okay.  However, lacquers must be used over primers (that is, real old-fashioned lacquer, not acrylic lacquer).  I have used the store brand acylic from Michaels for unusual shades of colors.  I have used a number of hardwares store spray cans where the model doesn't have a lot of fine detail, especially for a gloss black undercoat for Alclad.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2012
Posted by Blaine on Monday, March 18, 2019 1:16 PM

Thanks all for your responses. I wasn't aware that that model paints had a finer pigment.

Life is not about getting out of the storm, but learning to dance in the rain.

Don't tip to through life only to end up at deaths door. 

VS 82, VP40, VP31 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, March 18, 2019 1:59 PM

Results range from good to horrifying. 

Test the combo of paints you intend to use on something first, including the time intervals for drying.

Spray paint out of the can will usually be unacceptably thick, and prone to runs.

 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Monday, March 18, 2019 3:42 PM

GMorrison

Spray paint out of the can will usually be unacceptably thick, and prone to runs.

 

Not necessarily if you know what you’re doing. The secret is spray in several light coats.

In my youth years, I’ve used spray cans numerous times on my builds. Never had issues of spraying too thick or suffered runs. Thankfully, my grandfather taught me how to use a rattle can. 

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Monday, March 18, 2019 5:13 PM

Standard enamels, ie. Rustleom, etc., are going to have to be thinned WAY down to go through an AB.  The other downside is you can usually only get in pint or quart quantities.

You might find an auto paint store that can mix you whatever color you want based off a color chip book, but the cost is going to be outragous these days, though most can mix down to a couple of ounces (if they are willing).  These are going to be reducer specific as well, and some will require a hardner.  If hardner is required, geting the right raito in a small mix is difficult.  If you get an un-hardened version, it will take a couple of weeks to cure enough to do anything else with, and topcoating with another medium runs the risk of lifting.  Ie., using a clear gloss or flat laquer over the enamel if it hasn't had the hardner.

Personally I would stick with rattlecans in whatever color you need.

  • Member since
    November, 2012
Posted by Blaine on Monday, March 18, 2019 6:50 PM

Thanks for all the advice, I'll stick with the testors enamal for now. As for automotive paints I'm familar with acylic enamals and urathanes and I know they wouldn't be approperate for models. 

Just about everybody in automotive paints use catalist 

Life is not about getting out of the storm, but learning to dance in the rain.

Don't tip to through life only to end up at deaths door. 

VS 82, VP40, VP31 

  • Member since
    November, 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 5:34 AM

Blaine

Thanks for all the advice, I'll stick with the testors enamal for now. As for automotive paints I'm familar with acylic enamals and urathanes and I know they wouldn't be approperate for models. 

Just about everybody in automotive paints use catalist 

 

At least Testors is easy with good results pretty much assured.

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 9:20 AM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

 

 
GMorrison

Spray paint out of the can will usually be unacceptably thick, and prone to runs.

 

 

Not necessarily if you know what you’re doing. The secret is spray in several light coats.

In my youth years, I’ve used spray cans numerous times on my builds. Never had issues of spraying too thick or suffered runs. Thankfully, my grandfather taught me how to use a rattle can. 

 

Well good morning to you too. I'm sure you are expert at everything, but read again the title of the post.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 9:12 PM

I’m no expert by any means, GM. Just saying what I know from experience. 

 

Good morning to you too. Now pour yourself another cup of coffee. 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, March 19, 2019 9:22 PM

This time of day, Jameson's.

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