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How to reproduce fake wood grain

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SMH
  • Member since
    October 2017
How to reproduce fake wood grain
Posted by SMH on Thursday, June 20, 2019 10:33 AM

The wife asked me if I could do a model of her first car. I couldn't believe it but they make a model of a Ford Pinto station wagon. I guess they will make a model of anything. LoL. 

I need suggestions on reproducing the fake wood grain. I've experimented several times and the closest I've come is a base coat of dark brown then a over wash of tan. It looks like I tried brushing on paint. Just not convincing enough. 

Ideas?

Ford Pinto Station Wagon

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Thursday, June 20, 2019 11:16 AM

Sounds like you left out the key step of drag- or dry-brushing with a different tone to replicate a 'graining' effect. I personally like to do my base-coats in acrylic, then wash and drybrush with enamels. You can dry-brush with acrylics, but they're generally faster-setting and get a bit 'stiff' to use.

This might be an ideal thing to look for on Youtube. There are probaby dozens of tutorials on the technique, using whatever materials you prefer.

If you have any more specific questions, serve 'em up. There's a pretty good talent pool here.

Either way, best of luck!

[And no shame about the Pinto. I've recently found myself contemplating building Kate Jackson's pumpkin-orange '77 Pinto from 'Charlie's Angels.' Embarrassed]

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by lowfly on Thursday, June 20, 2019 11:18 AM

I have been researching this technique for a while now (RMS Titanic build soon) and i found this video that shows 3 different techniques and they look fairly easy.  let me know how it goes!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IbGvKSwK4g 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Thursday, June 20, 2019 11:27 AM

I forgot to mention...there are also a variety of easy-to-use wood-grain decals available, which might be a good choice for the large 'woody' panels on the wagon.

lowfly

I have been researching this technique for a while now (RMS Titanic build soon) and i found this video that shows 3 different techniques and they look fairly easy.  let me know how it goes!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IbGvKSwK4g 

Thanks for posting that link, Lowfly!

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, June 20, 2019 11:27 AM

There's a wide variety of wood grain decals available for the WWI wingnuts. Also model railroaders.

Check out this website:

https://www.uschivdr.com/shopping-categories/shop-wood-grain-decals/

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, June 20, 2019 11:34 AM

gregbale

[And no shame about the Pinto. I've recently found myself contemplating building Kate Jackson's pumpkin-orange '77 Pinto from 'Charlie's Angels.' Embarrassed]

 

My Freshman girlfriend had a white hatchback with some kind of strange cheat line decal around the beltline. Not a great car to try to make out in.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Thursday, June 20, 2019 11:59 AM

GMorrison
My Freshman girlfriend had a white hatchback with some kind of strange cheat line decal around the beltline. Not a great car to try to make out in.

Big Smile

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Thursday, June 20, 2019 12:06 PM

My process for wooden laminated propellers, adapted to a flat panel

Paint the panel with a mid tan that approximates the background/predominant color of the wood.  Seal this with Future/gloss to allow you to more easily fix problems down the line  

Use an artists fan shaped brush to lightly add in grain streaking. Go lightly,  less is more.  Go with an acrylic or oil.   If you make a mistake or add too much wipe it off the gloss coated base color and start over.  You may counter streak with some lighter colors to accentuate the grain effect

When dry spray a light, well thinned coat of Tamiya clear yellow to make a varnished look.  Clear orange is also an option for a heavier varnish look

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Thursday, June 20, 2019 12:25 PM

Hello!

This thread could be very interesting, but it needs pictures!

Good luck with your builds and have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, June 20, 2019 12:50 PM

It's important to work from a sample or photograph in order to make it real.

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Thursday, June 20, 2019 2:02 PM

I'm thinking contact paper or the wood grained duck tape that's around, since that's basically what this stuff was to begin with, although thicker and broader in full scale.

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, June 20, 2019 2:26 PM

Hi;

 No pics,but, here's what I did with a Ford Fairlane conversion to a Country Squire !. I used the decking stuff from two different ships that someone gave me .( parts were missing ) Worked perfectly ! One deck's parts were darker than another .I think one was carrier deck parts ( darker) and cruiser ( lighter ) .

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, June 21, 2019 9:14 AM

De[ends on size and shape of area.  For large, relatively flat areas I make homemade wood grain decals.  I have shot several wood doors of different wood, then use the image to make inkjet decals.

For smaller parts or complex shape ones, I use two colors of brown.  I paint the light brown first then dry brush the darker color in a grain pattern.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by Noah on Friday, June 21, 2019 11:09 AM

Here's a trick I've used on bigger parts, might want to try it on a spare part before doing it on the actual model.  

Wood Grain Painting

-Noah

Noah

SMH
  • Member since
    October 2017
Posted by SMH on Saturday, June 22, 2019 7:00 PM
Thanks for all the responses, I'm Just not happy with my attempts, going to try decals. Thought I'd make a paper temple then cut out the decal. I have some time before the decals show up in the mail so I think I'll keep trying.
  • Member since
    May 2017
  • From: Park City, Utah
Posted by Frankenpanzer on Thursday, July 4, 2019 6:30 AM

Hand painted plywood. Base coated with a light tan, then I used several heavily thinned Vallejo colors and a 10/0 liner brush. 

The side armor is plastic as well. I took a razor saw to texture the "grain" and painted accodingly. I drybrushed the worn areas.

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