SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Camouflage stencils...

497 views
7 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    June 2017
  • From: Winter Park, FL
Camouflage stencils...
Posted by fotofrank on Wednesday, July 3, 2019 9:32 AM

I'm thinking about using this stencil/mask set for the Hasegawa F-105D I'm building:

The maker assures the reader that the adhesive is like/similar to Tamiya Masking Tape. Is there anyone out there who has used this masking material? With success?

OK. On the bench:

Way too much to build in one lifetime...

  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Earth
Posted by DiscoStu on Wednesday, July 3, 2019 10:22 AM

I'm not familiar with that brand, but most masks I've used in the past are of the Tamiya-tape kind.  Companies like Montex use latex masks. 

"Ahh the Luftwaffe. The Washington Generals of the History Channel" -Homer Simpson

  

 

  • Member since
    June 2017
  • From: Winter Park, FL
Posted by fotofrank on Wednesday, July 3, 2019 11:41 AM

Yeah, I've used Eduard, E-Z Mask amd Montex. I think Eduard is my favorite...

OK. On the bench:

Way too much to build in one lifetime...

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Thursday, July 4, 2019 10:04 AM
I have always doubted the effectiveness of those things,how do you get a tight fit,especially on armor with all the contours,tool boxes,and aircraft with all the fiddly bits.Do these things really work.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, July 6, 2019 10:11 AM

There is a material called frisket film that is made just for that purpose. It is very low tack.  It used to be found only at art supply places.  However, I have seen it recently at Hobby Lobby.

It does not work well over compound curves, but works fine over flat or single curvature surfaces.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, July 6, 2019 11:12 AM

If you have decent flat art, like a profile and plan view in the instructions, making your own is pretty simple.

I make several photocopies at scale, and be sure and check that against the model as it may not be.

Put down some low tack (orange core) blue tape on the cutting mat wide enough to make a stencil from. 

Tape the copy down over that. Usually I'll trim the copy fairly close to the edge of the aircraft, then tape all around the edges.

Cut out the stencil with a sharp knife.

 

  • Member since
    December 2018
Posted by Ted4321 on Saturday, July 6, 2019 11:53 AM

GMorrison

If you have decent flat art, like a profile and plan view in the instructions, making your own is pretty simple.

I make several photocopies at scale, and be sure and check that against the model as it may not be.

Put down some low tack (orange core) blue tape on the cutting mat wide enough to make a stencil from. 

Tape the copy down over that. Usually I'll trim the copy fairly close to the edge of the aircraft, then tape all around the edges.

Cut out the stencil with a sharp knife.

 

 

I do similar to this except I just layer tamiya tape over the stencil/pattern right on top of the cutting mat. The tape is transparent enough that you can cut around the pattern that's under the tape.  You're left with basically a sticker the shape of the stencil.  Peel off the photocopied stencil and you have a pretty good mask.  When I try to trace or cut around a stencil on top of the tape, I have a tendency to push it out of place with the pencil/knife.

One thing I've learned is that it helps to keep the knife moving.  Stop as few times as possible. 

Of course this only works out if you have a scale drawing to work from.

T e d

  • Member since
    June 2017
  • From: Winter Park, FL
Posted by fotofrank on Saturday, July 6, 2019 5:13 PM

Don Stauffer

There is a material called frisket film that is made just for that purpose. It is very low tack.  It used to be found only at art supply places.  However, I have seen it recently at Hobby Lobby.

It does not work well over compound curves, but works fine over flat or single curvature surfaces.

 

 

Wow! Don, I haven't used frisket since drafting class back in high school. I'm probably going to go ahead with the Aero Mask just to try the stuff, since it's pre-cut to fit the model. Back when I started out I thought I was a slacker if I used pre-cut canopy masks. I've used Eduard masks enough to know that I'm not being a slacker if I use something like that. A tool like a pre-cut mask helps me deliver a better model in the end. Thanks everyone for your input.

OK. On the bench:

Way too much to build in one lifetime...

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.