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Primer

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  • Member since
    August, 2019
Primer
Posted by JBark on Saturday, August 03, 2019 1:51 PM

I'm just getting back into modelling and because I live in an apartment I'd like to keep my toxicity levels down. I have acrylic paints and on a recent visit to one of the few remaining hobby shops around I was told I would get better results if I primed. While my local art/craft stores have decent modelling paints and tools I did not find a spray acrylic primer. I want to be sure what I buy is low toxicity even though I will spray it on my balcony (taken in too much nasty stuff over the years.) Can I get recommendations on a canned acrylic spray primer. I will be brushing over the primer.

  • Member since
    November, 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Monday, August 05, 2019 6:30 PM

The only acrylic primer I'd try in a spray can is called The Army Painter. It's a resin based  acrilic undercoat and base coat in one. A single pass should do it, it's fairly thick ( thick is not my cup of tea but if it's your only choice what can you do). But the results I've seen and the reviews on it too have been encouraging even on small army figures. It comes in many colors, available at Amazon. You're on your own though because while I've seen good results and reviews and watched videos on the stuff, I've never used it.

If you had an airbrush I'd recommend Badger Stynylrez acrylic poly primer in a heart beat. It's become my favorite primer, it's all I use anymore and all model parts get primed with it..

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, August 05, 2019 8:47 PM
Get a good respirator,they don’t cost much and are effective,I never smell anything using the Tamiya rattlecan stuff.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, August 05, 2019 10:34 PM

Yes, priming is very important. I generally would suggest everything Tojo said, and for your circumstances might add the following.

Brush painting takes a lot of practice. It's effective once you get profficient at thiining your paint way down and painting multiple coats. You start to wind up with limitations though. An airbrush is much better for anything that has grades or shading, weathering effects, soft edges on camouflage, and of course acrylic paints. 

I would say think seriously about investing in an airbrush. The tool itself can be had for less than $ 100, compressors are a little costly, but a used one is fine. A spray booth is nice, but esp. if you are using acrylics; painting outdoors works pretty well. You'll also save money on paint in the long run.

  • Member since
    July, 2019
Posted by Robotism on Wednesday, August 07, 2019 3:39 PM

I would enjoy seeing someone try to do the hair spray technique with just an airbrush, it would be quite something.

Priming has lots of different reasons for being useful but the most basic is just giving you a solid foundation to work up from. If you start on a single colour background you can get an uniform result over the top of that easier. Vallejo make a great range of acryllic primers you can airbrush or hand brush. I will often use the black to prime a 28mm miniature and paint up from there.

Airbrush priming is popular but it's not the only option. I like rattle cans more than I do an airbrush prime because it tends to be a little thicker and grip a little better. It's never thick enough to fill in details with any of the 3 ways I prime so I use whichever suits what I'm doing better. When I airbrush a primer I find I can damage that coat much easier when handling than I can other coats and I take it into account.

If you're worried about toxicity look into army painter spray primers. They're ideal for spraying outside, very low toxicity and great value for money. Spray outside, leave them a few minutes and there's very little smell left.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, August 08, 2019 9:25 AM

Tojo72
Get a good respirator,they don’t cost much and are effective,I never smell anything using the Tamiya rattlecan stuff.
 

I also use the Tamiya primer on kits where I will not be using PE or resin.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February, 2017
Posted by ugamodels on Monday, August 12, 2019 9:34 PM

Don Stauffer

I also use the Tamiya primer on kits where I will not be using PE or resin.

 

What is the conflict between Tamiya primer and PE or resin?

I type on a tablet. Please excuse the terseness and the autocorrect. Not to mention the erors. 

  • Member since
    July, 2008
  • From: Albany, NY
Posted by jeffpez on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 8:29 AM

I've used Tamiya primer with PE many times and it works great. There were no coverage or adheasion problems and I see no reason to avoid it.

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 2:10 PM

If you're going to use acrylics, you definitely need to prime, because acrylics don't adhere to resin or plastic by themselves as well as enamels or lacquers can. 

I use Tamiya's Fine Surface Primer in rattlecans, and you'd be able to spray it outside with no problems.  I find it provides a good "tooth" for my finish coats to stick to.  The surface is very finely granulated, too, which helps finish with a fine, smooth coat.

I also use other primers, though, which you could also use, if you're spraying on a balcony in the open air.  I use Walmart's house brand automotive primer-the name has changed a couple of times, but it's still their brand-and Rustoleum.  I tend to use those more on metal figures, but they both provide a good base, too.  They're a little coarser in grain than the Tamiya primer, but I like using them where I might use enamels for my finish coats.

I also use Army Painter matte black as a primer, for my Maschinen Krieger kits.  In that case, I want the black base to support a weathering technique.  I use the matte black, apply finish colors using acrylic, then use a silicone scouring pad to scuff the paint and reveal the black underneath.

I use each of those primers, whether I apply my finish colors with a brush or with an airbrush.

Hope that helps!

Best regards,

Brad

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, August 13, 2019 3:13 PM

I'll agree with all above about Tamiya Primer. One small issue- I find that the white kind will "fish eye" a little if the surface isn't really clean. Easy to avoid.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, August 14, 2019 9:44 AM

jeffpez

I've used Tamiya primer with PE many times and it works great. There were no coverage or adheasion problems and I see no reason to avoid it.

 


I've had some adhesion problems. You just have to be very careful after painting.  I find it less a problem with resin, but even then I do not get as good adhesion as with a metal primer.  With PE, the problem is usually with parts I have to bend.  I like to prime while parts are on the fret, rather than after bending/folding, as it is harder to hold small PE after they are off the fret.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2019
Posted by JBark on Friday, August 23, 2019 10:31 PM
Thanks all.

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