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What's causing this airbrush effect, and is it normal? (NOT orange peel)

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  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
What's causing this airbrush effect, and is it normal? (NOT orange peel)
Posted by ohms on Monday, June 15, 2020 9:46 AM

https://ibb.co/0fBTJvg

https://ibb.co/znW3KYn

https://ibb.co/HB8ZhVP

https://ibb.co/HXcc7TS

https://ibb.co/hYRcmBC

 

Is it normal to have these uneven, glossy patches on your finish when airbrushing? This is after I apply the paint.

Is there something I'm doing wrong or does this happen to everyone? Maybe it's when I tilt the airbrush and no paint goes through? Or if I hold it in one spot for too long?

And if so, does it go away for you guys when you apply gloss/matte coats over it?

It seems unavoidable. Does it have a name? Maybe everyone has the same issue but it gets hidden if you take pics of your model in a certain way? 

Help me out. Smile

Sorry for the links. I'm still trying to figure out how to add pics directly into the discussion.

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, June 15, 2020 9:56 AM

What kind of paint are you using, and what thinner, if any?

 

Bill

Modeling is an excuse to buy books

 

  • Member since
    June 2014
Posted by BrandonK on Monday, June 15, 2020 9:58 AM

Simply put, you're not keeping the AB at a consistant distance while applying your passes. Practice will improve your technique, AB-ing is an art that takes lots of practice to get consistant results they way you want them to be.

To answer another of your questions, will gloss coat make this go away. Well, kinda with gloss, but largly the coats are uneven and that shows through. However, flat coat will hide much of this.

When you get your mixture thinned correctly and learn the proper air pressure to use for that said mixture, you will also need to develope the proper distance from the subject and also the speed at which you make passes. ALL of this comes with practice practice practice.

You can get away with alot of poor painting practices on aircraft due largely to the dull coats they usually have. But, if you were painting a glossy finish, like on a car. It would look horrible, like trash can bad. SO, just watch lots of youtube vids and take bits from them all and practice your spaying. You will develope your own methods for your paints and subjects and your results will get better every time. 

Good luck.

BK

On the bench: Alot !

On Deck: Alot more !

 

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
Posted by ohms on Monday, June 15, 2020 10:11 AM

GMorrison

What kind of paint are you using, and what thinner, if any?

 

Tamiya Acrylics. Thinned with generic Lacquer Thinner from a local hardware store.

Yet I've tried to shoot the paint through without any thinner and the same thing happens. 

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
Posted by ohms on Monday, June 15, 2020 10:16 AM

BrandonK

Simply put, you're not keeping the AB at a consistant distance while applying your passes. Practice will improve your technique, AB-ing is an art that takes lots of practice to get consistant results they way you want them to be. 

Yeah, this seems like it will take a while before I get it right. If the airbrush is too far away, I feel like I'm wasting too much paint. 

Plus even if I consciously try to keep at a good distance and speed, sometimes you get too caught up filling in the little nooks and crannies, and the consistency quickly goes away.

I have practiced a little on sheets of plastic. There definitely seems to be an improvement when you sit and just AB long enough. 

I might even need a more expensive AB in time. Becuase I'm just starting out and there were so many things I needed, I literally got the cheapest AB I could find online.

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
Posted by ohms on Monday, June 15, 2020 10:20 AM

It happens if I go too slowly I think. But if you go too fast, you'll have to do too many passes to cover the surface at a decent rate.

 

You're right though, it's just a matter of trying out different settings and techniques. 

I haven't actually seen a completed model "in person", just on video (let alone seen a model kit completed by someone I would consider a professional), so I have no idea how achievable a good paint job is.

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

  • Member since
    July 2018
  • From: The Deep Woods
Posted by Tickmagnet on Monday, June 15, 2020 10:35 AM

ohms

 

I might even need a more expensive AB in time. Becuase I'm just starting out and there were so many things I needed, I literally got the cheapest AB I could find online.

 

I wouldn't think the airbrush has anything to do with it. Could be the thinner you were using as well. I use Tamiya acrylics but use their x20A thinner and haven't had an issue like yours. Good luck with getting it all worked out.

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Far Northern CA
Posted by mrmike on Monday, June 15, 2020 10:36 AM

Brandon's post is right on. There are a few variables that you'll need to sort out to get good consistent results, but for starters Tamiya paints won't spray well unless they are thinned, sometimes as much as 1:1 and built up in layers. The type of thinner makes a big differance; I've gone from home center lacquer thinner to using Mr. Leveling Thinner, finding that it produces a much more even finish. For me it's worth the small extra expense - I use the generic product for clean up.

Hope this helps you!

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Virginia
Posted by Wingman_kz on Monday, June 15, 2020 11:29 AM
Try doing the difficult areas, nooks and crannies, first. Work your paint out to a comfortable distance from them and then spray the larger areas. You'll learn to blend them together.

            

  • Member since
    March 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Monday, June 15, 2020 1:28 PM

Hi, Ohms.

First, lacquer thinner is some pretty hot stuff, and it dries very quickly. Along with this, I'd guess you may have been too far from the subject. The fine droplets have the time to dry, before landing on the surface.

Second, what you're looking for is a smooth, still slightly wet layer of paint sprayed on the surface. Being acrylic, it will appear dry in seconds. If you see it "pooling" and staying wet for some time, it was sprayed on either heavily, too close, or the pass was made too slowly.

For working pressure, I mostly stay between 12 to 18 psi, don't know what that is in Bar. Experiment a bit, you'll soon know what range you prefer, but the pressure is a big part of airbrushing.

If you can source it near you, I'd recommend using Tamiya's X-20A as a thinner. If not that, then I've had great luck with 71% alcohol, I can't really see much difference between that, or the X-20A. Some guys say even distilled water is an acceptable thinner.

As others said, lots and lots of practice will be the best way to sort out what works well, and what doesn't. Large plastic bottles of liquids are great practice subjects, as long as they are smooth and shiny, like model surfaces. Best of luck with sorting it.

Patrick

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
Posted by ohms on Tuesday, June 16, 2020 4:50 AM

Thanks everyone. A lot of good advice offered.

I actually have some Isopropyl alcohol with me. More than 90% if I can remember. I bought it for hand brushing before I bought my AB. Will try it out.

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

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