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Orange Peel with Spray Varnish??? Please Help!

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  • Member since
    December 2019
Orange Peel with Spray Varnish??? Please Help!
Posted by Otto von Lindberg on Thursday, December 10, 2020 9:45 PM

Hi all, after finally getting a result that I'm happy with with an airbrush after many months, much to my disappointment, a simple gloss clear spray varnish (Tamiya TS-13) has almost ruined them.

I first sprayed my 1/48 Corsair with a thick, heavy coat in my garage (54-56F). The top half (my first pass) turned out very well except for a few spots where I got an "orange peel". When I repeated the process again on the bottom half, it turned out terrible! When I went on to a 1/72 Hs 129, I sprayed the upper half again with a quick light coat followed with additional coats after the initial layer dried (the temperature was now 60F). This turned out pretty good, but when I repeated the process on the underside, I got crackling again!!!:mad:

Can someone please help me understand what I'm doing wrong? Do I have to do even lighter, quicker coats? Do I need to warm the can up in warm water before I spray? Is the temperature of the garage too cold to spray (the instructions say at least 50F)? I have never had this issue before as I have always used Testors spray Glosscote without any issues.

Also, how do I fix the mess I already created? 3000 grit sanding sponge?

Please, any help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you!

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Thursday, December 10, 2020 10:14 PM

I've only had this problem if I sprayed to thick (lacquer gloss, over enamel paint). The lacquer "attacks" the paint below, and it's basically screwed(for lack of a better term!).

I only ever had small areas, that were easy enough to sand down, re-paint and re-gloss.

Some years ago, I bought a quart of Minwax Gloss lacquer, thin it about 45/55 (gloss/thinner) and run it through the airbrush. I use a cleaned out 1oz. paint bottle to mix and store small batches. Key is...do a couple light coats, then you can get a bit heavier with em.

For what it's worth...that quart of gloss was about $10...and it has done over 100 models...most were 1/72...but still a heck of a lot cheaper than buying "special" model clear gloss lacquer!

  • Member since
    December 2019
Posted by Otto von Lindberg on Friday, December 11, 2020 1:22 AM

Interesting, thank you. What Matt varnish do you use?

  • Member since
    December 2019
Posted by Otto von Lindberg on Friday, December 11, 2020 1:22 AM
Update: I used a can of Testor's Dullcote right now and it came out perfectly despite me only putting on one thick layer and it drying in a temperature of 56F while the can says to use it at least at 70F. This is incredibly frustrating since Rustoleom is discontinuing the Testor's line. I thought Tamiya was supposed to be better than this?
  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Saturday, December 12, 2020 10:40 AM

I use Testors flat. 1.75oz bottle, thinned 50/50 for airbrushing.

Never had any issue's with it. It is going down over a good gloss lacquer coat, though. Lacquer on lacquer.

I used to get problems when I used rattlecans...but I didn't do gloss coats. The issue is the difference in paint. Lacquer going on top of and "attacking" enamel paint.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, December 12, 2020 11:35 AM

Just out of curiosity, what kind of paint did you paint the model with before doing the clear coat?  How long did you wait after painting before putting the clear coat on, and what temperature was it kept at while the paint dried/cured?

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, December 13, 2020 9:00 AM

Oramge peel is usually caused by putting down too dry a coating, either moving too fast or from too far away.  Sometimes painting a dusty surface can look like orange peel until you look carefully.  Orange peel is most apparent on gloss finishes, flat finishes are more tolerant of dry coats.  If you are doing a gloss finish, sand out orange peel with 600 sandpaper and coat again, this time a bit wetter.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December 2020
Posted by TheDemiGod on Monday, December 21, 2020 9:09 PM

I used to get orange peel from time to time. It can be a number of reasons it happens. In my experience, I find two causes - spraying too thick and close or too cold outdoors (if spraying from rattle can outside). Most times for me is rushing by spraying too thick and too close to the model while spraying.

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