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Can I use Testors Spray cans in a garage?

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  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Silverton,Oregon,USA
Can I use Testors Spray cans in a garage?
Posted by TheModeler on Thursday, February 11, 2021 2:37 PM

Hello all,

I just got some Testors Spray cans(1 Flat Black Enamel,1 Dullcote clear Lacquer,and 1 Glosscote clear Lacquer)from Hobby Lobby,and the cans said to use them in 70 degree room temperature.I don't have any room to use them inside,and It is very cold,rainy and Icy outside so my best bet would be the garage,which is about 50 to 60 degrees at the max.Would I still be able to use my spray cans in the garage under 70 degrees?

Thanks,TheModeler(Novice Mode{Just for nowWink})

ON THE BENCH(My first ones):

-1:25 AMT/Round2 1969 Yenko Camaro(40% done)

-1:32 AMT/Round2 '63 Corvette Stingray(0% DoneGeeked)

-1:72 Atlantis Models Bell UH-1B Gunship Helicopter(20% done)

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Hatboro, PA
Posted by Justinryan215 on Thursday, February 11, 2021 3:36 PM

The spray cans I always keep my "every day use" cans (primers, clear coats) on my bench in the house, and when I need to spray them, I take them out to my Noninsulated garage, spray what needs spraying, give the piece a few minutes to flash off, then bring both back into my workbench.  if the model or figure is not too big to fit, I put it into my old food dehydrator set on low to fully dry.

Basically, the cans should be between 70-80 degrees for best paint ans spray performance.....

"...failure to do anything because someone else can do better makes us rather dull and lazy..."

Mortal as I am,I know that I am born for a day.  But when I follow at my pleasure the serried multitude of the stars in their circular course, my feet no longer touch the Earth...

 

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Thursday, February 11, 2021 3:37 PM

I sprayed my models in the garage before I built a spraybooth. I used an empty wine case carton to contain the overspray and to limit the amount of dust that fell on the wet paint. First I would keep the model in your house immediatly prior to painting in the garage. Second you should warm the spray can in warm, not hot, tap water.

  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Silverton,Oregon,USA
Posted by TheModeler on Thursday, February 11, 2021 5:12 PM

Justinryan215

The spray cans I always keep my "every day use" cans (primers, clear coats) on my bench in the house, and when I need to spray them, I take them out to my Noninsulated garage, spray what needs spraying, give the piece a few minutes to flash off, then bring both back into my workbench.  if the model or figure is not too big to fit, I put it into my old food dehydrator set on low to fully dry.

Basically, the cans should be between 70-80 degrees for best paint ans spray performance.....

 

Ah,good idea.But what do you mean by"Flashing off"?

Thanks,TheModeler(Novice Mode{Just for nowWink})

ON THE BENCH(My first ones):

-1:25 AMT/Round2 1969 Yenko Camaro(40% done)

-1:32 AMT/Round2 '63 Corvette Stingray(0% DoneGeeked)

-1:72 Atlantis Models Bell UH-1B Gunship Helicopter(20% done)

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Armpit of NY
Posted by MJames70 on Thursday, February 11, 2021 5:59 PM

I assume he is referring to letting the parts have a few minutes outside to let some of the solvents evaporate as the paint begins to dry, before bringing it in. Basically, leave the stink outside for a bit, as it off gasses the propellants and other stuff in the can besides the paint. 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, February 12, 2021 1:33 PM

Testors Glosscoat and Dullcoat are lacquers, and they behave different than most acrylics or enamels. Testors did make an enamel glosscoat but it went over like a lead balloon.

The problem with lacquers is that their solvent is very fast evaporating, and that rapid evaporation cools the paint surface by a lot.  So much so that the temperature can fall below the dew point on a humid day.  If that happens, water (dew) condenses on the surface and turns it matt white.  So humidity is more important than temperature.  Compare both- if temperature is only a few degrees above the dew point, do NOT spray Glosscoat or Dullcoat.  This is true even inside in humid summers.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Silverton,Oregon,USA
Posted by TheModeler on Friday, February 12, 2021 1:43 PM

Don Stauffer

Testors Glosscoat and Dullcoat are lacquers, and they behave different than most acrylics or enamels. Testors did make an enamel glosscoat but it went over like a lead balloon.

The problem with lacquers is that their solvent is very fast evaporating, and that rapid evaporation cools the paint surface by a lot.  So much so that the temperature can fall below the dew point on a humid day.  If that happens, water (dew) condenses on the surface and turns it matt white.  So humidity is more important than temperature.  Compare both- if temperature is only a few degrees above the dew point, do NOT spray Glosscoat or Dullcoat.  This is true even inside in humid summers.

Wait--What is the "dew point" temp for Dullcote/Glosscote?Are you saying it's fine to spray Enamels without too much humidity,but with Lacquers you do?I don't think I have any humid areas of my house,and outside it's freezing,so do you have any reccomendations/ideas?

Thanks,TheModeler(Novice Mode{Just for nowWink})

ON THE BENCH(My first ones):

-1:25 AMT/Round2 1969 Yenko Camaro(40% done)

-1:32 AMT/Round2 '63 Corvette Stingray(0% DoneGeeked)

-1:72 Atlantis Models Bell UH-1B Gunship Helicopter(20% done)

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, February 13, 2021 9:00 AM

TheModeler

 

 
Don Stauffer

Testors Glosscoat and Dullcoat are lacquers, and they behave different than most acrylics or enamels. Testors did make an enamel glosscoat but it went over like a lead balloon.

The problem with lacquers is that their solvent is very fast evaporating, and that rapid evaporation cools the paint surface by a lot.  So much so that the temperature can fall below the dew point on a humid day.  If that happens, water (dew) condenses on the surface and turns it matt white.  So humidity is more important than temperature.  Compare both- if temperature is only a few degrees above the dew point, do NOT spray Glosscoat or Dullcoat.  This is true even inside in humid summers.

 

 

Wait--What is the "dew point" temp for Dullcote/Glosscote?Are you saying it's fine to spray Enamels without too much humidity,but with Lacquers you do?I don't think I have any humid areas of my house,and outside it's freezing,so do you have any reccomendations/ideas?

 

No, I was referring to the dew point of the air.  Air always contains some moisture.  The dewpoint is a measure of how much. It is the temperature at which the air would be saturated and condense out.  If the temerature is 70 degrees and the dew point is 65, if you cool the air or a surface, water will condense on surfaces.  The rapid cooling of lacquer thinner can easily drop the paint surface temp five or ten degrees, and if dew point is within that amount of cooling from air temp, dew will condense on paint.  This is called blushing.  Old model airplane dope (and real airplane dope) had very volatile thinner also.  I learned about blushing when recovering old airplanes.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Saturday, February 13, 2021 10:59 AM

Just try it and see how it works.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Saturday, February 13, 2021 4:26 PM

JohnnyK
Second you should warm the spray can in warm, not hot, tap water.

When I was first getting back into scale modelling, a couple of years ago, I read about warming rattle cans before using them, so I tried it. I wish I hadn't! Instead of a nice, smooth, glossy finish on the airplane model I was building, I got a not-so-lovely "orange peel" effect. Apparently, I got the paint so warm that the paint droplets were already partly dry when they hit the model. Since then, I've just kept the paint stored in my apartment at room temperature, 20 degrees C/70 degrees F. 

I have the same problem as the OP. My condo is too small to use as a "spray booth," and it would be a major pain the in the butt to set up and take down a spray booth every time I wanted to use it. Instead, I bought a banker's box, used lots of duct tape to seal it, and installed a 40-watt tungsten light bulb to heat it to an approximation of room temperature before using it. It's worked great, although I do need build a bigger, somewhat roomier one.

Bob

 

On the bench: 1/500 Revell S.S. Hope, being built as the hospital ship U.S.S. Repose; Academy 1/72 F-86F Sabre, and a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor). 

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