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Mockup for my closet spray booth filter/vent

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  • Member since
    July 2009
  • From: North Carolina
Mockup for my closet spray booth filter/vent
Posted by Back to the bench on Saturday, February 27, 2021 8:24 PM

I got a simple mockup built for the filter and vent system on my spray booth that will be located in a hobby room closet. I decided to go with the straightest run possible which will mean that this is venting to an attic space. The attic is well ventilated and the filter in the plenum box is spray booth fitler media backed up by a thin charcoal filter. I will see how it goes but I believe that this setup will not result in much particle or odor issues in the attic space. The opening in the box is roughly 12" x 24" and I plan to build the permanant box so that it could accomodate a 12" x 24" furnace filter I choose to go that route in the future. Measuring at the center of the filter face with an anemometer the flow rate is 354 LFM. I will build a permanent version of the plenum using lumber and place that on a work surface located in the closet. A shelf above the work surface and plenum will define the top of the spray booth. That means the opening size for the "face" of the booth will be significantly larger than the filter opening which will mean flow rate in the booth is much lower. I think the flow rate will still be sufficient since the airbrush will basically be pointed towards the filter opening in the plenum when painting. I'm eager to see how this pans out and it is a fun project that hopefully will allow me to spray the occassional Alclad without evacuating the house DeadIck!

Vent

Gil
  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:28 PM

That looks like an interesting solution. However, as a retired architect and home inspector, I strongly recommend that you should not exhaust anyting, including paint vapors, into an attic. I would guess that your building code would not permit exhausting into an attic.

My paint booth is exhausted through the exterior wall to the outside. The first time that I used it I asked my wife to go outside to see if she could smell paint. I sprayed a lacquer paint into the spray booth and she said that she could distinctly smell the paint outside the house. I use a 1" fiberglass furnace filter in my spray booth. That kind of filter is not designed to trap small paint particles, which is why my wife could smell paint outside of the house.  Just my two cents.

Youe comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    July 2009
  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Back to the bench on Sunday, February 28, 2021 6:42 PM

JohnyK,

thanks for the information. I was hoping that the activated charcoal filter combined with the 2" booth filter would take care of particles and odors. But even if that works the code issue is a serious matter that I should have thought about and checked in advance. I certainly don't want to do anything that would violate building code or jeoperdize my insurance coverage. I know those codes exist for very good reasons that were sometimes arrived at by analyzing tragic events. Basically I was hoping to avoid cutting a hole through my new siding for a wall vent, but it seems I need to rethink things. Looks like this project just got a bit more complcated, but I learned something valuable in the process. Again thanks for sharing your expertise.

Gil
  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Sunday, February 28, 2021 8:58 PM

If you have an attic vent to the outside that is close enough, you might be able to plumb over to it, but don't know how it would affect your flow rate.

Definitely don't want a buildup of fumes, might just blow the roof off and irritate the neighbors

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, March 1, 2021 7:47 AM

Maybe you could run the 4" up another few feet and poke a hole in the roof? That would give you a nice straight run and since it looks like you procured a proper fan, should work great. Exhaust runs love straight runs, hate turns.

You're going to love that inline fan.

 

 

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    July 2009
  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Back to the bench on Monday, March 1, 2021 8:05 AM

goldhammer

If you have an attic vent to the outside that is close enough, you might be able to plumb over to it, but don't know how it would affect your flow rate.

Definitely don't want a buildup of fumes, might just blow the roof off and irritate the neighbors

 

 

 

Definitely need to do some more poking around in the attic space. The fan is 6 inch so dropping to a 4 inch duct would be a big hit in flow for sure. 

Regarding the roof raising, at least I wouldn't have to check for yellow jackets building nests under the eaves anymoreSurpriseBig Smile

Gil
  • Member since
    July 2009
  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Back to the bench on Monday, March 1, 2021 8:14 AM

Greg

Maybe you could run the 4" up another few feet and poke a hole in the roof? That would give you a nice straight run and since it looks like you procured a proper fan, should work great. Exhaust runs love straight runs, hate turns.

You're going to love that inline fan.

 

 

That would sure be the most efficient solution for flow rate. It's actually a 6 inch fan and duct and I did some playing around with a 90 degre elbow when I was measuring flow at the filter face. Adding a single 90 degree elbow cost about 40 feet/min flow at the filter face.

Gil
  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, March 1, 2021 10:28 AM

Back to the bench
It's actually a 6 inch fan and duct

That's even better, and you're gonna love that fan even more. If it's what I think it is, the flow rate is going to amaze you. I ended up going with 6" as well.

-Greg

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 5:10 AM

Could anyone provide a brand/model number of the fans you are using?  I'd imagine they need to be rated "explosion proof" in addition to having sufficient CFM.

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 8:33 AM

M

MJY65
I'd imagine they need to be rated "explosion proof" in addition to having sufficient CFM. Add Quote to your Post

Those were my parameters, and I ended up with this fan for the 6" duct I installed.

It's expensive and I know it's not for everyone, but I had over 30' run with a 90 degree elbow. Advantage to this sort of fan is it doesn't matter where it is mounted in the line. I can be at the booth end, at the exhaust end, or anywhere in the middle of the run, where mine is.

I got mine from a local HVAC contractor supply house, the Amazon link is for your convenience.

It is whisper quiet and I though I don't do it often, I can now spray rattle cans indoors without worry.

-Greg

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 9:53 AM

^^^^

 

Thanks for the link.  Is the explosion proof rating something you found in the product literature?  I don't see that in the Amazon description and want to make sure I'd order the correct one.

 

Thanks,

Mike

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 4:32 PM

MJY65

^^^^

 

Thanks for the link.  Is the explosion proof rating something you found in the product literature?  I don't see that in the Amazon description and want to make sure I'd order the correct one.

 

Thanks,

Mike

 

Yes. I'd check the manufacturers website first of this one, or any other you choose to make sure it specs out the way you want it. I remember looking and being satisfied, but my definition of explosion-proof and yours and the manufacurer's may differ, please don't take my word for it.

Also, there is a more complete flowrate info on the mfg site if I remember correctly.

And I'm sure there are others, mine was what the experts at the HVAC supplier recommended and what they had in stock.

-Greg

  • Member since
    July 2009
  • From: North Carolina
Posted by Back to the bench on Wednesday, March 24, 2021 8:50 PM

MJY65
Could anyone provide a brand/model number of the fans you are using?  I'd imagine they need to be rated "explosion proof" in addition to having sufficient CFM.

 

Apologies for not seeing this sooner. Here is a link for the fan that I planned on using.

https://www.acinfinity.com/hvac-home-ventilation/inline-duct-fan-systems/cloudline-s6-quiet-inline-duct-fan-system-with-speed-controller-6-inch/

Please note that this is not technically an explosion proof fan, or at least I don't see the manufacturer making that claim unless I missed it. I suspect there are extensive and expensive test and certification processes that manufacturers have to go through to attain those ratings. The fan is "electronically commutated" which means there are no brushes to cause sparks in the exhaust air flow. For me personally I feel this creates a system with acceptably low risk, but I am certainly no expert and you may want to consult an expert. 

Also please note that the main market appears to be hydroponics and I wonder if local law inforcement may visit to see what I am growingConfusedBig Smile

Gil
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