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Primer??????

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  • Member since
    November, 2005
Primer??????
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 31, 2003 5:02 PM
What kind of primer does everyone use??? I use a sandable aautomotive primer i by from Wally world.... is this ok??? what do you use????
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 31, 2003 6:47 PM
Hi Ron,
If it works, its ok! :-)

I use Dupli-Color automotive sandable primer (#1692 - Gray Hot Rod Primer) which has worked great for me. I also have some no-name stuff called Weekend spray paint. On the can it just says fast drying interior/exterior. I've used that too with no problems. As long as you test it before-hand to check compatibility, like I said before, if it works, its ok.

Ray
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 31, 2003 7:57 PM
use steel wool to "sand", then use like gloss blakc for nmf. no commnet
  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by naplak on Monday, March 31, 2003 8:10 PM
I have just recently started using Alclad Gray Primer and Microfiller. I REALLY like it. It is easy to apply -- it's a lacquer.

It filles those pesky VERY small sanding lines you sometimes get. And everthing sticks to it really well.

I get it from Squardon.com

They also make a gloss black primer.
www.naplak.com/modeling ... a free site for modelers www.scalehobby.com/forum/index.php ... a nice Modeling Forum
  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: East Bethel, MN
Posted by midnightprowler on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 4:29 AM
I use Duplicolor sandable auto primer. You just need to remember it is laquer, and should apply it in light coats so you don't craze the plastic. Never had any problems with it.
Lee

Hi, I am Lee, I am a plastiholic.

Co. A, 682 Engineers, Ltchfield, MN, 1980-1986

1 Thessalonians 4:13-18 1 Corinthians 15:51-54

Ask me about Speedway Decals

  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 11:06 AM
I use Dupont , Fill' and sand, is very smooth after you applied it, and if you use a 600 sand paper, is even better, very smooth finish

cheers
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 9:04 PM
I recently had a bad experience with Duplicolor, but I think it was more related to the plastic than the primer. I've used Plastikote as well and lots of people swear by it. I also recently used some Mr. Surfacer 1000 as a primer. It worked very well and filled in lots of minor scratches just as Naplak describes above.

M.
  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Tochigi, Japan
Posted by J-Hulk on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 9:41 PM
I've been using Tamiya's "Super Surfacer" primer.
Works great, no problems!
~Brian
  • Member since
    January, 2003
  • From: NE Georgia
Posted by Keyworth on Tuesday, April 01, 2003 10:46 PM
I use Krylon gray primer,and I've use the flat white primer as well. I haven't had any problems with either one. Cheap, too. Got mine at Wally-world. -Ed
"There's no problem that can't be solved with a suitable application of high explosives"
  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by jcarlberg on Wednesday, April 02, 2003 10:17 AM
If my model is all injection molded plastic, I usually don't prime it. If it has resin parts, or if I've used much putty or superglue filler, then I sometimes prime the whole thing, and sometimes just the filled areas.
  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Oak Harbor, WA
Posted by Kolja94 on Wednesday, April 02, 2003 10:56 PM
I don't prime injected molded plastic UNLESS I'm going to paint it white, yellow, or something like that (such as a trainer airplane). Then I'll use a light gray (lighter than the plastic's color). By giving the white, yellow or whatever a lighter shade to cover, it doesnt need to go on as thick or in as many coats. Also I make sure and use a FLAT gray so there's some "teeth" for the final color to adhere too.

Karl

  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, May 15, 2003 7:05 PM
I would like to know if priming an airplane model is as necessary as priming a car model? I have a Minicraft model of a Catalina PBY-5A I would like to build.
Aleady washed in anticipation of the several color's of paint that are
recommended. Also, since I'm painting with Testor's enamel or Model Master's enamel, which would be the best primer to use. I agree with the above that Krylon is cheap, but is it appropriate for enamel? Also want to know if you can use enamel paint over a laquer primer. Thanks very much for the help.
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, May 15, 2003 10:38 PM
I've grown quite accostomed to Armory Primer, available in white, grey, or black. It's mainly used by miniature painters, especially metal ones. I just like to have a completely uniform surface before shooting the actual model. Black primer is great for models that need a darker base color, such as most tanks and a few planes, while works well on brighter colors.

In answer to your question, mannyhern, I've used laquer primers and painted over them with enamels with no problem. Just don't reverse it, or the results will be disastrous! As to whether priming cars over A/C is more important, it's totally in the discretion of the modeler.

demono69
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, May 15, 2003 11:20 PM
I guess technically priming an airplane wouldn't be as necessary as priming a car model because one of the reasons for priming is to locate 'trouble areas' and surface irregularities that will affect the look of the glossy paint job. If you're painting a 'warbird' in flat camo colors it's probably not as imperative but if you're doing something with, say, an alclad finish that you want to replicate polished aluminum or metal panels you may want to prime first to help smooth out the surface.
One other reason for priming is to give the paint something to bite into and helps it stick better. As long as you wash the model off real good before painting and rough up the surface a bit with some sandpaper or something you could probably get away without priming. Depending on the type of paint you use though, sometimes you need a primer/sealer to keep the plastic from crazing. That's the main reason that I always prime. I use a lot of automotive type paints and I don't want to have any nasty surprises. :-)

Ray
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 16, 2003 7:23 AM
The best primer is none at all! If it isn't going to be seen on the model, don't bother to use it! It just wastes money that can be spent elsewhere!
  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by dogsbody on Friday, May 16, 2003 8:30 AM
Should I prime if I'm going to brush-paint a model.

"What young man could possibly be bored
with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Sunny Florida
Posted by renarts on Friday, May 16, 2003 8:56 AM
I would say more so. The brush will "push" and "pull" paint along the surface. As was said before, the primer gives it some "tooth" so it will make it easier for the paint to adhere.

Mike
Mike "Imagination is the dye that colors our lives" Marcus Aurellius A good friend will come and bail you out of jail...but, a true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn...that was fun!"
  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, May 16, 2003 12:16 PM
Thanks very much to heylonghair and demono69 for their insightful answers to my question as to whether to prime an airplane model. Since I will mostly paint by brush, I think I will prime. Thanks again.
  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Planet Ten
Posted by John Howling Mouse on Friday, May 16, 2003 4:15 PM
Krylon sandable primer in white and grey as required. Never knew before how much of a difference primer could make, especially with those faint little sanding marks!
"No, no, no, don't tug on that-----you never know what it might be attached to."
  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by dogsbody on Sunday, May 18, 2003 7:35 AM
What I meant to ask was if I should prime if I'm brush-painting Polly Scale or Tamiya acrylics?

"What young man could possibly be bored
with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"

  • Member since
    November, 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, May 18, 2003 8:22 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by renarts

I would say more so. The brush will "push" and "pull" paint along the surface. As was said before, the primer gives it some "tooth" so it will make it easier for the paint to adhere.

Mike


The answer would still be yes. The paint will 'behave' the same, no matter what type of paint it is. Also, when painting with a brush try not to go over the surface more than once or twice as your painting. The more you try to brush and smooth out the paint the more 'brush-strokes' you will get in your finish. It is better to just brush the paint on in a single stroke and then let it dry and then either put on another coat if it needs it or sand it (if its quite rough) and then put on more coats. If you leave the paint alone it will tend to 'level out' a certain amount depending on the type of paint. (some more than others but all paints will do it to a degree).

I hope this helps you out and don't be afraid to ask more questions if you're still unsure.

Ray

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