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Making the jump to the airbrushing world!

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Making the jump to the airbrushing world!
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, June 19, 2003 5:55 PM
Alrighty then, since I can't for the life of me fathom how to get a "streak-free" look with brushes, I just purchased a double-action airbrush kit. nothing too fancy, probably not the best, but I'm sure a beginner won't notice a difference anyway. Smile [:)]

I now need a compressor, and there's where the dilema lies. My workspace (literally none) is in my room, which isn't too big to begin with. I really don't feel like having to walk to the basement everytime i have to airbrush something. Sad [:(]

I have a 4 door closet, wich i'm thinking of sealing one section off the rest, get some wood boards and make a table inside the closet, along with a light fixture. that way i have a workstation inside the closet and a place for all the kits, paints, and such, all i need to do is open the door and push over a chair. Big Smile [:D]

For that, I need a quiet air compressor, but not something too bulky, but above all, quiet. the other dilema is the fact that airbrushing in such a small enclosed space might not be a great idea because of the fumes. that in itself would be ok because i could just close the door, but i wonder if the rest of the room will be ok.... Question [?]

so to finalize... what compressors do you fine people use? and is the fume issue as bad as i'm making it out to be? thank you in advance.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Panama City, Florida, Hurricane Alley
Posted by berny13 on Thursday, June 19, 2003 7:38 PM
Yes, the fume issue is bad. It doesn't matter what type of paint us use, all can be dangerous. Just trying to breath in the cloud of paint particles in the air can cause problems. As a mininum use a painters mask and set a fan drawing air out of the room through an open window. This is not something that should be taken lightly. You may not know you are having a problem untill it is too late. Safety should be your first concern in this hobby. If you can't do it safely, don't do it.

Berny

 Phormer Phantom Phixer

On the bench

TF-102A Delta Dagger, 32nd FIS, 54-1370, 1/48 scale. Monogram Pro Modeler with C&H conversion.  

Revell F-4E Phantom II 33rd TFW, 58th TFS, 69-260, 1/32 scale. 

Tamiya F-4D Phantom II, 13th TFS, 66-8711, 1/32 scale.  F-4 Phantom Group Build. 

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Pominville, NY
Posted by BlackWolf3945 on Thursday, June 19, 2003 8:24 PM
Stangfan,

Paint fumes are definitely bad news, (look at what they did to me! Tongue [:P]) and that cloud just hangs in the air sometimes. It'll also start to leave traces on the surrounding environment.

If you're going to spray in any enclosed space, large or small, you really should look into some sort of evacuation system to get all those fumes and the mist out of the house. A spray booth is a great thing, but buying one can be expensive and building one is simple, but only if your inclined to do it! I've got to build a new one and I'm just freakin' lazy! LOL

A decent alternative would be to get a good pattern of airflow with fans and such to try and draw the stuff out of a window or sumthin', but you'll still get traces of paint building up here and there and leaving the window open is sometimes a pain. Just ask my buddy Eagle334. You out there Wayne?

If you're just starting off, it'd also be a good idea to spray in an area where an "oops" won't matter too much. I'd recommend spraying in the basement or outside just for now until you can decide how you're going to do it indoors safely.


Fade to Black...
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, June 20, 2003 3:48 AM
My buddy at my local hobby shop recommended tha cambell hausefeld ari compressor. It is relatively quiet(it doesnt wake my wife up in the next room) and is smaller than most compressors but larger than the over priced mini hobby compressors. I recomend you look into some thing like it due to it will always give you more than you need in the pressure depart ment(meaning no pulsing of the paint on your 118.00 dollar f18 hornet) and it's cheaper. It coast me 100.00 bucks at walmart. Just remember what ever compressor you pick up also pick up a mositure trap or your paints will never spray right. Hope this helps.

Happy modeling
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, June 20, 2003 7:15 AM
thanks for all the repplies... just out of curiosity what's a moisture trap? and is it safe to assume most air compressors come with the pressure regulator included?
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Lyons Colorado, USA
Posted by Ray Marotta on Friday, June 20, 2003 8:29 AM
When air is compressed it is heated. When the pressure is released, it cools
causing condensation. You don't want water coming out of your airbrush with the
paint. The moisture trap will prevent this from happening.
Most compressors DO NOT come with a pressure regulator. I bought a
combination moisture trap/pressure regulator at Sears for less than $30.00.
You should get a little more compressor than you actually need for airbrushing so it can be put to other uses like pumping up a low tire.
Ray

 ]

 

 

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: UK
Posted by gregers on Friday, June 20, 2003 8:49 AM
Hi Stangfanatic. For years i have used a compressor out of an old freezer. its almost silent and didn't cost me a thing.i have a small gas bottle as an air chamber with a regulator / pressure dump valve in line after the bottle. Getting hold of one may be a problem now due to the ozone protection laws in some countries and just ripping one out could land you in trouble with the authorities. I know this is the "cheapskates" option but it works for me. Oh and i had a friend of mine who is a gas plumber check it out for safety (Didn't fancy blowing myself to bits)....Gregers
Why torture yourself when life will do it for you?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, June 20, 2003 10:16 AM
Another alternative to your dilema may be to place a descent size compressor in the basement and plumb a line into your room for the air. Indusrtial compressors are less expensive than those of the hobby variety and offer better performance. Also if you ever need a compressor for other hobbies or shop use you have one.

Schedule 40 pvc pipe is adequate for plumbing air. There is no need for expensive and harder to work with brass. Just be sure to use the extra strong "grey" pvc glue. As long as you do a quality install job with the pipe it will not leak. My compressor is in my garage and I plumbed a line into my workstation. I leave the compressor on 24/7 and I have no leaks/no compressor turning itself on at 2 a.m.

Put your water separator at the end of the line, near to your brush as possible. This gives the hot air coming out of the compressor time to cool, and the ensuing condensation will gather in the trap. Placing your water separator on the compressor is a waste of money, unless you let the air cool in the tank before you use it.

  • Member since
    December 2002
Posted by garyfo on Friday, June 20, 2003 11:35 AM
In a way...I killed two birds with one stone when I started airbrushing in my basement.

Yes there are paint fumes....but it's also where the cat box is.

The two pretty much cancel each other out. Big Smile [:D]
Gary
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: UK
Posted by gregers on Friday, June 20, 2003 11:47 AM
Hey Garyfo Have you got any sense of smell left? I have two cats and their tray stinks also i spray paint at work all day and that stinks (just like cat pee) I can't imagine the two combined.I can recomend a VERY good spray mask...Greg
Why torture yourself when life will do it for you?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, June 20, 2003 2:13 PM
Just made the jump myself but I went the CO2 route. I met an airbrush artist who had some 20# tanks and regulators lying around since he uses 50# (and alot of them); got the package for $50 (USD). Got a fill for $18 and off I go. Best of all it is silent and takes up about 1 sq.ft. of floor space.

I know it didn't answer your question but I'm so pleased w/ myself I had to tell someone! :D
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: UK
Posted by gregers on Friday, June 20, 2003 2:41 PM
Hi goperez I have a CO2 bottle for my mig welder but hadn't thought of that one i'll have to try it, thanks....Greg

p/s Before anyone tells me i know your not really suposed to weld with CO2 because the gas is too cold ...cheers ..Greg
Why torture yourself when life will do it for you?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, June 20, 2003 11:40 PM
thanks for the helpful info... i might try this http://members.verizon.net/~ziz62266/booth.html
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, June 21, 2003 1:16 AM
Ok I got a question then in reference to the storage tub spray booth he left a link to...

What if you don't have a window? would a resperator filter do the trick of getting rid of the fumes? Isn't that what it does when you wear a mask? just a thought. let me know what you guys think

Happy Modeling
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: UK
Posted by gregers on Saturday, June 21, 2003 12:45 PM
Hi F4ufan. Do you mean something like an extractor fan with some sort of gauze filter and some ducting ?. It may work but it would be better to have the air going outside if you could. The extractors where i work (spray painting) do so on a similar system and they are effective...Greg
Why torture yourself when life will do it for you?

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