SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Airbrush disgust

1718 views
14 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November 2005
Airbrush disgust
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, June 22, 2003 5:33 PM
I am so disgusted with these Aztec airbrushes. I spent about two hours this afternoon working on them...cleaning everything in alcohol (no...not Jack Daniels, altho by the end of the day, i needed some of that too). The pressure is set at 40 on the compressor. I am not getting the paint to come up the tube, ergo, no paint on the model. I am half tempted to unload these damn things, and go to spray cans.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, June 22, 2003 8:18 PM
I'm a beginner airbrusher so bear with me....


I assume you are spraying only air at this moment correct?

Paint is thinned correctly?

is 40psi a bit high? I read around people suggest 18-23 psi...dunno *shrugs*
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, June 22, 2003 9:16 PM
thanks for the reply, Vermont. Yep...just air...but it sure is a nice air. Paint is very milk-like in substance, and i had the regulator at about 20, but someone said 35-40 is better. I think it is about 35 right now.
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Virginia
Posted by Wingman_kz on Sunday, June 22, 2003 9:54 PM
At the risk of being flamed...I feel your pain...

Check your nozzles. I've had the same problem and as far as I can tell it comes from the needle getting pushed forward as you screw in the nozzle. It could be from overtightening or from taking the nozzles apart to clean them. If the center section isn't seated in the outer part of the nozzle before you screw it in then the backing on the needle will contact the valve inside the brush and shove it forward allowing only air and no paint to pass.

I've had problems with mine sputtering and leaking paint behind the nozzle if the nozzle wasn't what I considered to be overtightened. It shouldn't have been a problem, it was all new.

Whatever, that's what I've noticed about these Aztecs. Among other things. Personally, I think they're nothing more than overpriced toys. For the same price or a *Few Dollars More*, you could get a Badger, Passche, or Iwata. Which is exactly what I plan to do.

Just as soon as I can make up my mind which one...Big Smile [:D]

            

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Virginia
Posted by Wingman_kz on Sunday, June 22, 2003 10:12 PM
This just in...

Something I hadn't thought of before. What can I say, at times I'm an idiot. Along the same line though. Before you screw the nozzle in, back the roller adjustment on the top of the brush all the way off. As far as I could tell measuring with a depth gauge, the needle inside the body moves about .040 to .060 and if it is screwed all the way out and the needle isn't completely seated in the nozzle it could be enough to force the needle forward and not allow any paint to pass. Considering the spring inside and the movement of the needle it would only force the needle all the way forward rather than finish seating it's holder in the nozzle. Does that make sense?

Still doesn't change my opinion of the Aztec though...

One more thing. Turn the air down. I'd try 20-25psi to start and you may be able to reduce that even lower. Depending on the medium you're spraying and the nozzle you're using..

            

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: West Des Moines, IA USA
Posted by jridge on Sunday, June 22, 2003 10:39 PM
I've had this problem too. Every time it's turned out to be a clogged needle, either from dried paint in the nozzle/needle or contamination in the paint. Pull the needle out of the nozzle and clean both. Be careful. The needle is fragile.

This can really drive you nuts if you have more than one nozzle clogged like this --- guess how I know......

Hope this helps.

Jim.
Jim The fate of the Chambermaid http://30thbg.1hwy.com/38thBS.html
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, June 23, 2003 11:27 AM
Wingman, are you saying that the needle should not be in an exposed postion when you are operating the brush? This may be one of the problems. I have one that is definitely exposed. I am going to take it out and soak it in alcohol.
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Virginia
Posted by Wingman_kz on Monday, June 23, 2003 2:23 PM
In case you hadn't guessed...I'm a rookie at this too. I'll try to explain what I mean.

I found out early on that the white piece in the center of the nozzle would come out of the gray/beige/blue part. I haven't tried breaking it down any further and don't think I would. Also, inside the body of the brush there is another *needle* valve which is what you're adjusting with the roller on the top of the airbrush. This is what adjusts how far the needle extends from the nozzle and how you adjust the paint flow. Say you're holding the brush in front of you with the nozzle pointing forward, if you adjust the roller all the way to the left then the needle valve inside the body of the brush is adjusted to it's most extended position.

So, if the brush is set this way when you screw on the nozzle and maybe there is a little paint build up on the end of the needle inside the body, it will force the needle in the nozzle out too far which will shut off any paint flow. I've also noticed that when this happens the needle in the nozzle will get stuck in the extended position. Either from the needle itself being force to far forward or the little nylon follower at the very back of the nozzle getting cocked sideways and preventing it from returning to the open position.

Am I making sense so far? Sometimes I'm a little vague with the written word, sorry.

I don't recall seing this in the instructions, I guess they assume we know what we're doing, but what I am suggesting is that when you change nozzles you should adjust the roller on the top of the body of the brush all the way to the right. Or, to it's retracted position.

Also, once you get your brush working and have finished spraying, unscrew the nozzle and look inside the body of the brush and you'll see that there is still some paint inside the front of the brush. You should flush this out with some thinner and wipe it out with a pipe cleaner or something similar. Just running thinner through the nozzle from another bottle isn't enough. The little tool provided with the brush will wipe around the needle valve inside the brush but I don't think it will actually touch the end of the needle to clean it. All it takes is a few thousandths of an inch to mess everything up.

What all this means is, if you've taken the needles apart make sure you seat the white part that holds the needle into the nozzle. Adjust the roller on top of the brush all the way to the right before you screw in a nozzle. And, when you're done spraying, be sure to clean out the body of the brush. I don't mean take it apart, just clean behind where the nozzle screws in.

I hope this gets you going and apologize for being so long winded. Also, unless you're using acrylics, I'd use something other than alcohol for cleaning. Lacquer thinner would be more effective if you have it, if not, then whatever thinner you're mixing with.

            

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, June 23, 2003 8:24 PM
I had the same problem with my Aztec 470, and it was caused by the nozzle being too tight. Only finger tighten it (you'll think it's not tight enough, but it will be fine).

Glenn
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, June 23, 2003 8:50 PM
i think i understand what you are saying, Wingman. I have the 470 which has the roller...i should turn that all the way to right before inserting a nozzle??? I have stuck the nozzle part in a container with alcohol...and i am still getting no paint. i am using Model Master acrylics. But i think i am going to make a run into Lexington to get some Tamiya spray cans and finish this model and then work on the air brush problem. Dang, i hate air brushes cuz they are do cussed delicate.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Monday, June 23, 2003 10:39 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by huskerguy

Dang, i hate air brushes cuz they are do cussed delicate.


I say get rid of that Aztek POS and buy an Omni, Anthem or Eclipse and you will never need another airbrush. Big Smile [:D]

Plastic has no place in an airbrushes manufacturing process. Wink [;)]

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Virginia
Posted by Wingman_kz on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 2:55 AM
Here Here Mike...I second that motion...

I bit the bullet and splurged on a new airbrush this evening. No, didn't order it from Dixie, I bought it locally. Paid a few dollars more for it but it's in my hands. And surprisingly, the folks at the hobby shop (chain store) were very helpful. All in all, had a great day! (the lady working there even offered to give me lessons...*big grin*)

I got a Badger 360 Universal and it's great. There's all the difference in the world between it and the Aztec. I couldn't believe the difference when I started to spray with it. The spray was so fine. I KNEW there was a better way. hehe The end of the brush rotates easily from using the gravity feed to siphon, you don't have to loosen anything, just turn it.

A couple shops that I went to were really pushing the Paasche VL but I didn' t like the large body and the weight forward feel of it. Of course, they had them on the shelf and not the one I wanted to try...

Please forgive my rambling Huskerguy...Try this...Yes, turn the roller all the way to the right then screw in a nozzle. Pull back on the lever and then adjust the roller to the left. You should see be able to see the needle move farther out of the nozzle and when you turn the roller back to right, it should retract. If that's not happening, for one reason or another, your nozzle/needle is jammed. Maybe from paint build up inside the nozzle or from the needle being shoved to far forward and sticking. Maybe there's even something wrong with the body itself...

I haven't tried acrylics yet and know little about them but I'm not sure if soaking alone would get rid of dried paint. You may have to spring for a new nozzle. One shop owner that I talked to today was very emphatic about what a good brush the Aztec is, particularly for acrylics. I told him of the problems I've had with mine and he told me to get in touch with Testors, through email or phone, and tell them about it. He says they stand behind their products and would make it right. You may want to give that a try yourself. Please don't be offended by this but, if you do get in touch with them, be nice.

            

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 8:16 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Wingman_kz


I got a Badger 360 Universal and it's great. There's all the difference in the world between it and the Aztec. I couldn't believe the difference when I started to spray with it. The spray was so fine. I KNEW there was a better way. hehe The end of the brush rotates easily from using the gravity feed to siphon, you don't have to loosen anything, just turn it.


Great news Wingman. The 360 is a good brush also and is basically the same as the Anthem except for the split-personality. Big Smile [:D] I'm glad to hear that you found out there really are better airbrushes out there.

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    February 2003
Posted by snobrd13 on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 9:17 PM
Hi there,
I've used a Badger 150 and a Paasche VSR 90 with less success than I have with the Aztek. I must be doing something wrong. I make sure that I soak the tip after each use, then blow it out a couple of times before storing it and I have found it to be very consistent and reliable.
snobrd13
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, June 26, 2003 12:19 PM
Hey Wingman, whats the procedure for cleaning a 360. Is it user friendly, cause the badgers and pasche I've held and inspected seem fragile and complicated. Nothing compared to cleaning the 470, but I'm not to happy with my 470. Either I'm not doing something right or there are valid reasons why many hobbyist's are not happy with this gun. Don't know if I want to trash it and go with possibly the 360. What does this gun retail for? Thanks for the info

Hank

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.