SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Paint Thinner ???

1401 views
8 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November 2005
Paint Thinner ???
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 2:56 AM
I have a testor air brush and i use the wal mart brand of minerial sprits ...is this bad or what should i use?
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: United Kingdom / Belgium
Posted by djmodels1999 on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 4:05 AM
Well, all makes of paints come with their own thinner(s) and recommend its (their) use. Testors are not likely to advertise for the Humbrol thinner, nor Wal-Mart's... Other than for Tamiya's acrylics, I never use the brand name thinner but 'normal' supermarket mineral spirit ot the chemist's isopropyl alcohol... Way cheaper!
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Pominville, NY
Posted by BlackWolf3945 on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 8:25 AM
Uh, depends on what type of paint you're using. Also are you asking if it'll harm the airbrush itself? (I believe you're referring to the Testors Aztek plastic brushes?)


Fade to Black...
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 4:29 PM
Yes and most of the time it will be testors paint and will it mess up my paint jobs?
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Pominville, NY
Posted by BlackWolf3945 on Tuesday, June 24, 2003 8:08 PM
Some mineral spirits may not work too well with enamels. (There are diff kinds) I'd stay safe and use the Testors thinner with their paint. In general, it's usually a good idea to use the paint manufacturer's thinner.


Fade to Black...
  • Member since
    December 2009
  • From: West Grove, PA
Posted by wildwilliam on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 7:20 AM
i think the resin body of the Aztech style airbrush is impervious to most common solvents. min has shown no ill effects from lacquer thinner, and various name brand thinners.

i agree w/ Blackwolf on the paint side. if you keep mixing around you will eventually run into mischief. if you have to experiment, make sure it's on scrap or a 'test body'. or you will be asking questions about stripping paint!
:-)

(i am not making fun of you. i went down that road. for me, it is cheaper in time & money to either follow the recommendations, or experiment carefully and track the results.)

i use mostly Tamiya Acrylics now. i agree that their thinner is over priced, but it is pretty reasonable if you can find it in the 250ml size. you end up w/ 5 times as much thinner (compared to the small jar) at just over twice the price. i talked my local hobby shop into stocking it, and they now sell like hot cakes. must be i was not the only one hoping for a better deal!
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 7:57 AM
I use regular store bought thinner (usually from Wal-Mart or Ace Hardware) have haven't had a problem.

I almost always use Testor's Model Master enamels sprayed with an Aztech. For cleaning the Aztech, straight thinner in the siphon cup with no damage to the body or nozzles.

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Peoples Socialist Democratic Republic of Illinois
Posted by Triarius on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 1:07 PM
First, my "bona fides": I used to work as a formulator/chemist in the aerosol paint industry.

If solvent based paints don't harm your airbrush, then mineral spirits certainly will not.

There is no reason not to use mineral spirits to thin or clean solvent based paints for airbrushing. It's about the mildest organic solvent available. There are three caveats:

1. make sure you are using mineral spirits, not mineral spirits mixed with something else.

2. for thinning, it is wise to strain the mineral spirits through a fine mesh screen before adding them to the paint. The stuff not made specifically for modeling use may have debris in it.

3. USE WITH ADEQUATE VENTILATION!!!

Obviously, DON'T use mineral spirits with acrylics!

If you are concerned about the compatibility of any solvent with any paint, take an old, empty, clean paint bottle. add equal amounts of the solvent and paint, tighten the lid, and shake vigorously. If the mixture gets thick, lumpy, stringy, or sticky, the paint and solvent are incompatible with each other. If they look okay at first, wait a week. If shaking the jar after one week does not produce normal looking mixed paint, they are incompatible. If it looks like normal thinned paint, it's okay to airbrush, but I would not save the thinned mixture for more than a day or two.

Ross Martinek A little strangeness, now and then, is a good thing… Wink

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, June 25, 2003 10:26 PM
I think a lot of my paint problems come down to the fact that I am a lonely soul in my world of modelling, as none of my friends or family model anything. So I have never known how to properly thin paint. I really should have found this forum a lot sooner. I use turpentine with my Testors and Testors Model Master enamels, but I have an obviously bad habit of thinning the entire jar and using it straight out of the jar. I think that I may have to sit and read a little more, before I wreck anything else. I also use an Aztek, and cleaning is really straight forward.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.