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painting techniques

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  • Member since
    November 2005
painting techniques
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 11:31 AM
This is a painting forum yet so little is talking about the actual painting PROCESS! I wonder if there are any techniques or tips you guys have that can help achieve an award winning finish with an airbrush. The process itself, such as how to move your hands and pressure/distance, ect...

One miscellaneous question: do those expensive Tamiya masking tapes really mask better than regular US masking tapes? If so, how?
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: The flat lands of the Southeast
Posted by styrene on Friday, August 1, 2003 12:32 PM
I'm NOT trying to be obnoxious, but there's a story about a motorist in New York who passes a fellow walking down the sidewalk. The motorist, trying to get directions, yells out, "How do I get to Carnegie Hall?". The pedestrian yells back, "Practice, practice, practice!"

Paragraph after paragraph on "how-to" could be written by both the novices and the experts on this forum, and it's all going to boil down to doing what works for you. For example, some will tell you to keep the brush moving. Depending on the technique, you don't want to do that. FSM has published many articles over the years on airbrushing. There are a boatload of professional airbrush magazine articles and books on processes. I would encourage you to read some of them. And after having read them, you are simply going to have to do what the rest of us have done: practice, practice, practice.

As far as Tamiya tapes go, I find that the 3M blue painter's tape that you can find at Lowe's and Home Depot works just as good. The stuff adheres well to the surface, but has a low tack, and is therefore easy to remove when done, and doesn't leave any adhesive residue upon removal (at least on armor models). The only downside is that the narrowest I've seen is about 1 to 1 1/2 inches. But then a sharp X-acto can cut it to the proper dimension.
Gip Winecoff

1882: "God is dead"--F. Nietzsche

1900: "Nietzsche is dead"--God

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, August 1, 2003 9:02 PM
my new Badger 360 arrived today and I'm going to practice with it a bit. I plan to use acrylic paint to practice since it's so easy to clean up. But later when I do my models, I prefer enamels. I wonder if acrylics and enamels spray the same...so I don't have to practice with enamels....
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: The flat lands of the Southeast
Posted by styrene on Friday, August 1, 2003 10:41 PM
I prefer enamels also. I have mixed them from 50:50 to 70:30 (paint:thinner). Over the last year or so, I have use a color cup exclusively, and have stopped measuring; it simply takes too long. I'll throw in a bit of paint, add some thinner until I think it's about right, test it on a piece of newspaper, and if it's OK, I'll shoot it. The only acrylics I've used are the Tamiya ones. I have mixed them around 90:10-80:20 with isopropyl alcohol. I believe somewhere in another post, shermanfreak (Robert) has sprayed Tamiya acrylics straight from the bottle with pretty good results. I have found that the acrylics (again, Tamiya) seem to have a finer pigment than do enamels; they are "slicker" on a plastic surface, if that's descriptive enough.
The bottom line: There are differences in paint types. It won't hurt to practice with the paint you're ultimately going to put on your pride and joy! Enjoy that new Badger brush, and keep us posted on your efforts.
Gip Winecoff

1882: "God is dead"--F. Nietzsche

1900: "Nietzsche is dead"--God

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 4, 2003 5:44 AM
I also read & read & read about airbrushing before I got one, so I had learnt alot before I had even touched an airbrush. I think reading up on it helps but it is just something you have got to practise. You will end up finding the best technique that suits you, and remember there is more than one way to arrive at the same outcome.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 4, 2003 5:57 AM
I also have a roll of Tamiya tape and a roll of 1inch white masking tape which I got at work. As far as I'm concerned I can not see the $8 difference. This Hobby can prove to be quite expensive so I have always got my eyes open for a cheaper alternitive that is just as effective as the real deal.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Harrisburg, PA
Posted by Lufbery on Monday, August 4, 2003 10:17 AM
FWIW, I bought some Tamyia masking tape, but I find it too thick to work with. I'm having good luck with regular masking tape. :)

Regards,

-Drew

-Drew

Build what you like; like what you build.

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, August 4, 2003 1:09 PM
Hi Folks, question:is there any way to bring back to life old,dried paint? I have a bottle of Pactra authentic international colors-Boot Black #IC73- It's the best semi-gloss black I've used.The guy at the hobby shop said that Testors bought Pactra and now only make the colors in spray paint.(but not boot black).Any help?

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