SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Question About Sealing Decals

606 views
6 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    January, 2006
Question About Sealing Decals
Posted by rdmeyersr on Sunday, February 12, 2017 8:34 PM

I just had some custom decals done and they need to be sealed before using. They are Alps printed and the producer said not to use lacquer based gloss coats. Would Testors enamel gloss cote work?  

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, February 12, 2017 8:42 PM

When I purchased a "Try it out" decal paper kit, it came with Krylon Crystal Clear acrylic coating to seal in the custom printed decals. So enamel gloss coat probably won't work since it's a paint, not a sealer.

You might find it in a craft store.

I find it strange the vendor who made your decals didn't bother to seal them for you.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, February 13, 2017 8:49 AM

The fact that the OP's decals are Alps-printed is an important fact here.  However, even for inkjet decals, results depend a lot on exactly the ink used.  This is complicated by the fact that each mfg may used different inks in different model printers.  Ordinarily, for those making inkjet decals themselves, I recommend putting a few test samples on the sheet and testing those decals with any intended gloss coating. Are there any decals on the sheet that you will not be using that you could test?  Maybe a brand logo or a catalog number?

Everyone I know doing their own decals uses some clear "paint" as opposed to a product labelled or intended as a "sealer."  I have used both Testors lacquer and enamel clearcoats, rattle can clear acrylic sprays, and clear polyurethane rattle cans.  Each works with some inks, not with others.  I have no experience with Alps inks not already clearcoated by printer, so I would try very hard to find some printed areas on the sheet to try clear coats.  While lacquers are hotter solvents, at least they dry fast, and drying time of clearcoats does seem to be an issue in sealing inks.  I believe Alps printers sublime a colored wax, so they may respond to solvents a bit differently than inks or dyes.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Monday, February 13, 2017 9:50 AM

All sound advice there, Don.

I too use Tester gloss, thinned with lacquer, on home made decals from an inkjet printer.

Hopefully there is a spare section or decal in your purchase so you can do a test.  One thing to watch out for is not to spray too heavy, as that creates a thick decal.  This will resist conforming to curves, and also produces a noticeable step around the edge.

regards,

Jack

 

  • Member since
    January, 2006
Posted by rdmeyersr on Monday, February 13, 2017 10:34 AM

Anyone used Microscale's Micro Liquid Decal Film solution to coat their decals?

http://www.microscale.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=MD&Product_Code=MI-12&Category_Code=FINPROD

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Monday, February 13, 2017 12:26 PM

It could work. I wonder if they can be airbrushed on the custom decal sheet you have.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 9:00 AM

rdmeyersr

Anyone used Microscale's Micro Liquid Decal Film solution to coat their decals?

 

Yes, it works fine.  I always test a section of the decal sheet unless it is a very new kit.  Almost all commercial decal sheets have a product ID on the sheet, and these areas end up being a decal too, so they can be used as a test decal.  If the decal breaks or shatters, I coat the decal sheet with Decal Film and do prefer the Microscale stuff, though several other brands do work too.

The only problem is that the stuff turns the decal sheet into one big decal and you must then cut each decal out carefully.  However, I generally trim decals closer to the graphic anyway, for a better appearance.  So that trimming doesn't bother me.

Another thing I do with all kits is scan the decals.  That way if I screw up a decal I may be able to make an inkjet copy.  That has saved me ordering a new decal sheet a number of times.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

SUBSCRIBER-ONLY CONTENT
FREE NEWSLETTER