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Fading decals?

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SM2
  • Member since
    December, 2012
  • From: San Antonio, TX
Fading decals?
Posted by SM2 on Monday, July 03, 2017 11:38 PM

I'd like to find a technique to fade decals.  I'm not talking about weathering over them, rather, making them look faded from exposure to sun and elements.  Any ideas, anybody?  Thanks,

 

Jim

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 4:37 AM

I know people put older decals in the sun to remove yellowing, that might work. Might take a couple of weeks though.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

  

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/32nd Fw 190D-9    

  • Member since
    January, 2009
  • From: hamburg michigan
Posted by fermis on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 6:39 AM

SM2

I'd like to find a technique to fade decals.  I'm not talking about weathering over them, rather, making them look faded from exposure to sun and elements.  Any ideas, anybody?  Thanks,

 

Jim

 

Well...to get that faded look...you do have to "weather" over them.

In addittion to the "wash" that they get, along with the rest of the model...when it comes time for the final flat coat, I'll flat coat the whole model, then add a drop or two of a light tan, grey or even white to about 1/2 a cup (airbrush cup...not a measuring cup!!!) of flat coat. Since the flat paint is just tinted, the color builds up very slowly and is quite forgiving...you have to try pretty hard to over due it! The paint will remain a good consistancy for airbrushing, and you don't get any of the problems that come about with trying to use really thinned paint.

Beyond that...a little bit of light colored pastel chalks finish things up.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 9:25 AM

As a first step I just go over the decal with the color under the decal, with the airbrush dialed way back.  I may then use a lightened color, or even flat white, again dialed way back, on the top of horizontal surfaces and top of fuselage.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 12:03 PM

Not sure what your modeling (car, ship, plane, building?) But somtimes I use a very fine sandpaper and lightly sand the area untill I get the desired faded look.

Test on something else first !!!! It takes some practice to get the right "feel" for this tecnique. I usually use this on signs on walls or painted signs on wooden buildings but I have used it on a few ships and a truck or two.

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

SM2
  • Member since
    December, 2012
  • From: San Antonio, TX
Posted by SM2 on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 3:35 PM

Thanks, everyone, for the great replies so far.  Specifically, this question is about armor models, but I had the same problem with a ship model I finished a while back.  I put hull numbers on a ship, and they were way too bright.  I finally dry brushed a light coat of the ship color over it, but that wasn't exactly what I wanted.  Now I'm working on armor models, and I'd like to replicate the look of painted markings on vehicles that have been left in the sun.  Hence, the question.  Regarding the replies, I don't have an air brush, so that's out, but that's more weathering than the effect I'm after.  Maybe what I want to do is not possible to model, although I'm going to try the sand paper idea--that sounds interesting.  But, again, maybe it's impossible to fast forward fading on a model!

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Tuesday, July 04, 2017 4:34 PM

Another thing you could try  ( and again TEST FIRST !)  is to apply multiple coats of Dullcoat. After a few coats the dullcoat starts to get opaque and slightly "milky" in apperance. BE CARFULL !!! Too much of this can "blush " the surrounding paint and I will not be held responsable.

There used to be a Dust color from Floquill. Spraypaint that duplicated dust. A cote or two of that would be just the ticket. But I don't know if they still make it and it feels "sticky " even after it's dry. I use to use it and wondered how cat fur could be "attracted" to it after a week. If you can find a can of it make sure to dullcote it after about 30 min. And make sure to shake the can for about 10 min ( yes your arm will get tired)

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Wolfman_63 on Wednesday, July 05, 2017 8:25 PM

On a ship I built many moons ago I wanted to fade the hull numbers. I actually scanned the decals into the computer then "faded" them digitally. With the hull numbers I used the hull color and made the fade and rust lines with the photoshop fade brush. Came out great. For dark insignias like the blue circle with star on aircraft you can scan it in and lighten it.

On a Zero model I used photshop to add chips and scratches to the red insignia. The hardest part was aligning the panel edge chips with the panel lines on the model.

Printing your own decals is the best way to get the effect you want. You can see what it looks like before you make the decal.

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Aircraft Build Album - https://www.flickr.com/photos/128642409@N05/albums/72157648900196769

USS Carl Vinson Build Album - https://www.flickr.com/photos/128642409@N05/albums/72157687002588814

 

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