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Gloss showing through clear coat

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  • Member since
    June, 2017
  • From: Pottsboro,Tx
Gloss showing through clear coat
Posted by Mars on Thursday, January 04, 2018 9:01 PM

I have painted a 1/350 Titanic hull with Humbrol satin white, satin coal black and satin red. I hand brushed Humbrol gloss clear on the decal spots. I put on the decals and after drying I lightly buffed the entire hull with a 3000 grit pad to remove any small imperfections and to clean up the tape lines a bit. (I did not buff the decals) Today I painted a coat of Humbrol satin clear, hoping this was to be the last coat on the hull. It looked great and I am impressed. except that the clear gloss , though not so gloss anymore, still shows through the satin clear. My question is, do I keep putting coats of satin clear on until the gloss is gone or do I buff the gloss spots with a fine grit sandpaper and then do 1 coat with the satin clear? Or is there a better way?

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: State of Mississippi. State motto: Virtute et armis (By valor and arms)
Posted by mississippivol on Thursday, January 04, 2018 9:39 PM

I've had that happen to me, and I've never spot coated since. It is best to clear the entire model before decals. You may be able to go back with a gloss coat over the entire model, then go back with the satin after it dried. Someone may have a better idea, though.

  • Member since
    June, 2017
  • From: Pottsboro,Tx
Posted by Mars on Thursday, January 04, 2018 10:24 PM
After reading your response I see that my ideas wont really change anything. If I buffed over the gloss parts and then shot a satin clear it would still show the gloss. Enough coats of satin to hide it would be a lot of coats.
  • Member since
    June, 2017
  • From: Pottsboro,Tx
Posted by Mars on Friday, January 05, 2018 6:20 AM

What if I sprayed flat on the gloss areas and then a final coat of satin?

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, January 05, 2018 9:14 AM

Is the satin a semi-gloss, or eggshell?  If so, then a flat first followed by the satin may be the way to go.  Experiment- apply a scrap decal to a piece of plastic painted with the paint you used, then the two overcoats, and see how it comes out.  Testing yourself is better than relying on others results, your application style may vary things.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    June, 2017
  • From: Pottsboro,Tx
Posted by Mars on Saturday, January 06, 2018 8:45 PM
It's semi gloss. I've come to realize that it doesn't look that bad. No one will ever notice it, just me. I agree with Mississippi that the whole model must be gloss before decals.. Nothing I could do once I put the clear over the semi-gloss with gloss spots. So now my question is- Why paint military airplanes flat, then gloss clear for the decals instead of painting gloss colors first, decaling and then flat clear?
  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, January 07, 2018 11:06 AM

Mars
It's semi gloss. I've come to realize that it doesn't look that bad. No one will ever notice it, just me. I agree with Mississippi that the whole model must be gloss before decals.. Nothing I could do once I put the clear over the semi-gloss with gloss spots. So now my question is- Why paint military airplanes flat, then gloss clear for the decals instead of painting gloss colors first, decaling and then flat clear?
 

Because there are no gloss versions of many military colors. If the model is a pure black, or primary color, then I don't bother to use flats, merely, as you say, flatten it after decals.  But there are so many tans, greens, and blues for which there is no gloss available- you must mix it yourself, not easy to do.  Most military colors are very low saturation, almost tinted grays.  Paint manufacturers tend to provide only high saturation colors in gloss sheen.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2014
Posted by Silver on Saturday, March 24, 2018 7:03 PM

One reason when Gloss shows through is that if you use rubber or cloth type gloves while handling the model it will cause a accidental rubbing and it actually polish the surface causing a gloss look.Also make sure you properly mix the overcoat amount .

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