SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

How to clean up Squadron Putty?

1136 views
9 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Chicago, USA
How to clean up Squadron Putty?
Posted by MonsterZero on Thursday, November 30, 2017 6:45 AM

One of the reasons I stopped using Squadron Putty and switched to water-based products is because once applied to the model it cannot be cleaned up without damaging the model (or sanding, which also damages the model).

The other reason is Squadron dries inside the tube and now I have 4 or 5 tubes of rock-hard putty in the house, completely useless.

Or am I missing something? Is there a thinner that will wipe Squadron Putty clean without melting the model underneath?

 

  • Member since
    April, 2003
Posted by nfafan on Thursday, November 30, 2017 7:41 AM

Agree with your take on their putty.. that said, for their "green putty", I have good results using nail-polish remover on a "q-tip" swap, makeup sponge, soft rag.

  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: ohio I want to leave
Posted by armor 2.0 on Thursday, November 30, 2017 7:42 AM

MonsterZero

One of the reasons I stopped using Squadron Putty and switched to water-based products is because once applied to the model it cannot be cleaned up without damaging the model (or sanding, which also damages the model).

The other reason is Squadron dries inside the tube and now I have 4 or 5 tubes of rock-hard putty in the house, completely useless.

Or am I missing something? Is there a thinner that will wipe Squadron Putty clean without melting the model underneath?

 

 

   I uses fingernail polish remover to thin the putty and also to remove excess putty from model without damage

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Wyoming Michigan
Posted by ejhammer on Thursday, November 30, 2017 8:50 AM
Acetone, the major component of nail polish remover.

Completed - USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa Dec 1942, USS Yorktown 1/700 Trumpeter 1943. In The Yards - USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa 1945, USS ESSEX 1/700 Dragon 1944, USS ESSEX 1/700 Trumpeter 1945, USS ESSEX 1/540 Revell (vintage) 1962, USS ESSEX 1/350 Trumpeter 1942, USS ESSEX LHD-2 as commissioned, converted from USS Wasp kit Gallery Models. Plus 35 other plastic and wood ship kits.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, November 30, 2017 8:52 AM

I have heard of useing acetone for clean up. But each tube i have had, i am lucky if i get half of it out before it goes hard. Stopped useing it now.

''I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so''

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Phantom FG.1

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, December 01, 2017 9:25 AM

When it comes to sanding or filing damaging a model, sometimes no amount of filling with a putty will fix a seam- sanding or filing will be required.  One example is where the fuselage sides are not the same height along the seam.  That is, one side does not exactly match the other side.  Even if the sides are so flat that there is no gap along the seam, there will be a step at the seam.  This is actually quite common.

So making the seam invisible often does require sanding or filing- one has to learn to deal with this.  Yes, sometimes this means that panel lines that cross the seam fade out to invisibility.  The normal way to deal with this is to re-scribe those panel lines- just another skill the modeler must eventually acquire.  Or, in other cases the builder may say, hey, these panel lines wouldn't really be that visible in this scale, and prime and fill the finish so that those seams disappear.  Many painted aircraft that are kept in good condition only show panel seams on removable (access) panels or things like passenger doors or gear doors.  In other cases, things like wood or fabric covered construction have very few panels.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2014
Posted by Silver on Monday, December 18, 2017 2:55 PM

Good move.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, December 18, 2017 8:11 PM

If you use most fillers, there will be some clean up after. At least all of the ones that I’ve tried have needed some sanding with progressively finer grits in order to blend with the surrounding area flawlessly. 

That being said, Squadron putties respond well to liquid cement to help them attach, settle, and more malleable. And yes, you will have to sand afterwards to get a good finish for painting afterwards.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    October, 2009
Posted by JacknewbIII on Saturday, December 23, 2017 11:37 AM

Soak a q tip in rubbing alcohol and rub away the excess. Should work with squadron and testors putty. If you do it while the putty is still a tad bit damp it is very easy to work with. Good luck!

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.