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Can you ID this tool? (Please?)

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  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Can you ID this tool? (Please?)
Posted by gregbale on Friday, May 04, 2018 4:16 PM

Received a small box of hobby tools from the widow of an old acquaintance. Included was something I'd never seen before: apparently stainless steel, six inches long...with no helpful markings or part numbers anywhere. It's shaped rather like a miniature harpoon...only the barbed-shape point is smooth and rounded, obviously never sharpened (or apparently intended to be).

The late gentleman from whom I received it wasn't a ship modeler...but my best (and only) guess is that it's some sort of rigging tool.

Anybody have a better idea?

 

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

"

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, May 04, 2018 4:21 PM

It looks very similar to my Squadron scribing tool.

 

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  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, May 04, 2018 4:26 PM

stikpusher

It looks very similar to my Squadron scribing tool.

 

That's what I thought at first as well, but the tip is chromed and dull, and seemingly the wrong shape to take an edge or point. It looks almost like a sewing tool for ripping out tack-stitches...but the wrong kind of handle, and no 'edge' to cut or rip.
Thanks for the reply.

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

"

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, May 04, 2018 4:40 PM

Maybe a sculpting tool?

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, May 04, 2018 4:48 PM

I think it's a crochet hook.

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by KnightTemplar5150 on Friday, May 04, 2018 5:24 PM

Greg - in your second photo, the close up, it's a little hard for me to tell if you have bare metal that resembles brass or if the color I'm seeing is a reflection of some sort, but it looks as if the shaft has been bent around a bit. If this is the case, my best guess is that your mystery tool is a slightly modified dental instrument called a "gum knife". 

When I was learning to carve jeweler's wax, the instructor would require us to modify dental tools to use on the bench. Carving wax is really a combination of scraping and heating, so very sharp instruments are not all that useful. A gum knife can scrape channels into the wax for setting stones later on and ground to various widths for adding decorative touches. It all depended on what was needed at the moment.

Depending on how this one is ground, it's application for plastic depends on the modeler. Sculpting, putty application, making weld lines, applying glue - it depends in the situation and your imagination in solving problems. Whatever it is, you'll find a use for it!

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, May 04, 2018 6:52 PM

Thanks to all for your replies.

KnightTemplar5150
When I was learning to carve jeweler's wax, the instructor would require us to modify dental tools to use on the bench. Carving wax is really a combination of scraping and heating, so very sharp instruments are not all that useful. A gum knife can scrape channels into the wax for setting stones later on and ground to various widths for adding decorative touches. It all depended on what was needed at the moment.

The gum knife sounds as plausible as anything else.

I think I'll take a grinder to it, and make it a scriber. Big Smile

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

"

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Friday, May 04, 2018 8:46 PM

GMorrison

I think it's a crochet hook.

 

I am with GM on this. My mom used similar when she crocheted.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Friday, May 04, 2018 9:20 PM

    I vote sculpting tool or leather working tool. The hook doesn't appear deep enough for a crochet hook.

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Saturday, May 05, 2018 8:37 AM

GMorrison

I think it's a crochet hook.

 

 

That is not a crochet hook. I should know because my mom used to crochet blankets/afghans  and such.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, May 05, 2018 9:05 AM

It may be a crochet hook, but it can be used by ship modelers as a rigging tool.  Often one needs to pull the free end of a line through the makings of a knot, but the line is inside a maze of other lines.

Personally, I prefer something with a sharper notch- the crochet hooks let the line slip off too easily.  I bought a cheap plastic crochet needle and cut away part of the eye, leaving a better hook shape.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Saturday, May 05, 2018 9:20 AM

Don Stauffer

It may be a crochet hook, but it can be used by ship modelers as a rigging tool.  Often one needs to pull the free end of a line through the makings of a knot, but the line is inside a maze of other lines.

Personally, I prefer something with a sharper notch- the crochet hooks let the line slip off too easily.  I bought a cheap plastic crochet needle and cut away part of the eye, leaving a better hook shape.

That's kind of the direction I was originally leaning. The nicely-chromed and finished end is blunt enough that it seems specifically intended not to 'do damage'...but all the other photos of purpose-designed 'rigging tools' I found looked like they had a real hook, rather that just a slightly-rounded 'step.'

Ah, well, one for the ages....

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

"

  • Member since
    January, 2014
Posted by gobobbie on Saturday, May 05, 2018 8:39 PM
It looks to me to a variant of a spring puller. This is a tool that was designed to pull springs in teletype devices. There is another one called a spring pusher where the end is shaped the opposite way, for placing springs in teletype. If you were a teletype repairman (submarine nec 23eh) you carried one of each in your top pocket next to black ink pen and green ink pen for the captain to sign messages. Bob Gregory Ruining one kit at a time
  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, May 05, 2018 11:01 PM

gobobbie
It looks to me to a variant of a spring puller. This is a tool that was designed to pull springs in teletype devices. There is another one called a spring pusher where the end is shaped the opposite way, for placing springs in teletype. If you were a teletype repairman (submarine nec 23eh) you carried one of each in your top pocket next to black ink pen and green ink pen for the captain to sign messages. Bob Gregory Ruining one kit at a time
 

Whats a teletype, LOL! Something like a fax machine?

  • Member since
    September, 2014
Posted by Teddz on Sunday, May 06, 2018 4:44 AM

my mom was a hairdresser and had a similar tool she would use when she would highlight someone's hair. She would put a rubber cap with pre-formed holes on the person's head and using a tool, like the one in the pic, she would then pick out stands of hair through the pre-formed holes.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, May 06, 2018 11:44 AM

GMorrison

 

 
gobobbie
It looks to me to a variant of a spring puller. This is a tool that was designed to pull springs in teletype devices. There is another one called a spring pusher where the end is shaped the opposite way, for placing springs in teletype. If you were a teletype repairman (submarine nec 23eh) you carried one of each in your top pocket next to black ink pen and green ink pen for the captain to sign messages. Bob Gregory Ruining one kit at a time
 

 

 

Whats a teletype, LOL! Something like a fax machine?

 

 

It was the successor to the telegraphic.  It allowed any idiot to send a telegraph message.  It in turn was superceded by the radio- telegraph

73

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, May 06, 2018 12:18 PM

gregbale

Received a small box of hobby tools from the widow of an old acquaintance. Included was something I'd never seen before: apparently stainless steel, six inches long...with no helpful markings or part numbers anywhere. It's shaped rather like a miniature harpoon...only the barbed-shape point is smooth and rounded, obviously never sharpened (or apparently intended to be).

The late gentleman from whom I received it wasn't a ship modeler...but my best (and only) guess is that it's some sort of rigging tool.

Anybody have a better idea?

Why not ask the person who gave it to you? maybe he/she might give you clues of what it is. Worth taking a shot at asking. 

I know that not crochet hook at all nor sort of a hair puller tool used in beauty salons.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2014
Posted by Silver on Friday, August 31, 2018 12:05 AM

It’s a dental tool.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Friday, August 31, 2018 8:49 AM

Silver

It’s a dental tool.

 

 

I disagree...

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, August 31, 2018 9:01 AM

By the way, it is easy to make a ship rigging hook from a crochet needle.  Take a cheap plastic one and grind away a quarter of the eye- one of the quarters nearest the point. Converts it into a nice hook.  I need to do this again, since I lost my last one during a shop cleanup.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, August 31, 2018 9:11 AM

Don Stauffer
By the way, it is easy to make a ship rigging hook from a crochet needle. Take a cheap plastic one and grind away a quarter of the eye- one of the quarters nearest the point. Converts it into a nice hook.

I did exactly the same thing with an old carpet needle. Worked great.

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

"

  • Member since
    January, 2014
Posted by Silver on Monday, September 03, 2018 1:03 AM

Got the information from a dental surgeon .

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Monday, October 08, 2018 12:21 PM

Hmmmm:

 I went through my tools . I have one too . Mine was given to me by a friend . I use it for embossing Wooden decks .  I also use it for embossing plank features on carved block hulls .

 I  also use it to score gently the paper bulkheads and decks for folds . Works way better than a regular embossing ( Round Tip ) tool . I did use a Arkansas Stone to dull the edge though     T.B.  P.S. I have another I bought years ago that I filed a groove in.   Like Don said I use it ( or used it ) for pulling rigging on sail ships . Those of course now have to be small and so I didn't think about this until you posted the photo .

  • Member since
    March, 2010
  • From: Winamac,Indiana 46996-1525
Posted by ACESES5 on Saturday, October 13, 2018 2:39 PM

I bought one of them from Squadron several years ago was advertized as a glueing tool did'nt work very good,put down to much glue.      2 cents               ACESES5

  • Member since
    November, 2016
Posted by Kilo 66 on Saturday, October 13, 2018 7:21 PM

A harpoon for hunting very small whales?

Okay, that was awful. I think it's a dental instrument of some sort, pressed into service as a rigging tool. I had something much like that in my plank-on-frame building days.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, October 14, 2018 11:05 AM

Kilo66 ;

 You are so right ! Didn't I see you step out of the shrinking cell with the rope in hand after you extracted it from that miniature grey Whale ? I gues that reason is a good as any . 

 I have seen dentists use a similar tool when mounting amalgam metal fillings . They use it to sculpt the top of the molars to the proper shaps .

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