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Pin vises

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  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, July 30, 2019 8:21 AM

Hi;

 Expounding more on the Ball handles.The ones I bought from TIMEX when I worked there were made in Solingen? Germany. I still have all of them and their bits. I now buy bits in the sliding Cover/Dispenser from Micro-Mark. Then, only when I really need them .

   The shorter Korean ones with the collars and numbers are really neat and as Bill says very sharp.

  • Member since
    April, 2016
Posted by GlennH on Monday, July 29, 2019 9:05 AM
Just took a chance on some pin drill bits I found on Amazon made by Gyros Precision Tools. Unlike the garbage bits that came with the original pin drill these things have sharp points! If the rest of the bit is sharp it does no good if you can't get a hole started. The couple I tried were fantastic. I will note that the cheap bits worked ok AFTER you had a pilot hole started. The best news was the customer service. Two bits were missing. I thought I'd give it a shot and emailed Gyros. Five days later I had a two pack of each of the missing bits.

A number Army Viet Nam scans from hundreds yet to be done:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/southwestdreams/albums/72157621855914355

Have had the great fortune to be on every side of the howitzers.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 9:39 AM

I don't know either, but they are somewhat different things. If I follow your point, a pin chuck is used in a larger tool, in general a bench mounted power tool.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2014
Posted by Graham Green on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 7:01 AM

I don't know just how many persons on here would know the difference between a Pin Chuck and a Pin Vise. Now if you want to keep breaking small drills, then just buy and use a Pin VISE, or, if you prefer to reuse those small drills, then make sure you buy a Pin Chuck. 

A Pin Vise is NOT very accurately made at all, the jaws will never be centrally located in the body. This means that as you rotate the instrument, the drill bit is wobbelling around all over the place. Not a nice thing to be happening to a very thin drill bit. So a slight bit of side pressure from you, at the wrong moment and you'll soon need another drill bit. They are cheaply made and very popular with modellers because thay are so cheap, but, if you invest in something cheap, then you only get what you pay for.

Now a Pin Chuck is a very different animal alltogether, these are manufactured so the drill bit remains central to body at all times. These are manufactured to be used as a smaller accurate drill chuck, placed into the body/jaws of a much larger chuck that can not accomodate a very small drill bit.

A Pin Chuck looks a tad different to a Pin Vise too. A Pin Chuck normally has different sized collets for different ranges/sizes of smaller drill bits. They do not have those burred up handles for fingers to get a grip onto, to break lots of small drills. They have a smooth handle that can be inserted into a bigger chucks jaws, to over come this slight problem, all you have to do is make a round timber handle to slip over the smooth end and glue in place with some Araldite, problem solved.

Pin Vises

https://www.google.com/search?q=pin+vise&newwindow=1&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwieiPngw4TjAhVjguYKHXNhBL4Q_AUIECgB&biw=1725&bih=1033

 

Pin Chucks

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&channel=crow&q=pin+chuck

 

Choice is yours alone to make, of which type you buy.

 

Now those Tungsten Carbide PCB Milling Cutters are excellent to use if you have a small drill press, they work magically if they are kept at an absolute upright working position. Putting these cutters into a Pin Vise is just asking for them to break as the slightest sideways pressure applied to the cutter will soon have you replacing another broken cutter.

If you are only going to use a small drill bit on polystyrene, acrylic, aluminium, brass or wood, then a normal twist drill is much more forgiving than a Tungsten Carbide PCB Milling Cutter. A normal twist drill will bend slightly as you use it without it breaking.  Oh, the small twist drills are as cheap as chips as well, more money in your pocket to spend on more models.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, June 17, 2019 11:50 AM

GMorrison

Hi Bill,

 

Sorry this took a few days. I've been away.

Here are two pin vises that are the subject of discussion. Both are steel and both have swivel fittings on the end.

The one on the left is the split chuck type, the one on the right an open collet.

That's the one I use.

 Here's my drill set, or what's left of it. Time to order more. Notice that the bits all have the same size shank, which is a firm fit into the vise collet and it only takes a little twist to lock it in.

 

These look really nice. On my list for an upgrade too.

  • Member since
    April, 2016
Posted by GlennH on Sunday, June 16, 2019 10:20 PM

MasterGunner

My favorite pin vise isn't a pin vise at all.  I picked up a small battery operated Ultra Tech Precision Power Screwdriver and drill chuck from MicroMark (also available on Amazon) about a year ago.  It is about the thickness of a felt tip marker and uses two AAA batteries.  I haven't used my pin vise since getting this.  The powered driver allows you to focus more on the correct angle as you aren't having to provide the rotation also.  The speed is just about perfect for the small bit sizes used for scale modeling.

Rick

 

Just looked at it. Do you have a reccomendation for drill bits that are not total junk like the ones I seem to buy?

A number Army Viet Nam scans from hundreds yet to be done:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/southwestdreams/albums/72157621855914355

Have had the great fortune to be on every side of the howitzers.

  • Member since
    June, 2019
  • From: Seattle Area
Posted by MasterGunner on Wednesday, June 12, 2019 1:30 PM

My favorite pin vise isn't a pin vise at all.  I picked up a small battery operated Ultra Tech Precision Power Screwdriver and drill chuck from MicroMark (also available on Amazon) about a year ago.  It is about the thickness of a felt tip marker and uses two AAA batteries.  I haven't used my pin vise since getting this.  The powered driver allows you to focus more on the correct angle as you aren't having to provide the rotation also.  The speed is just about perfect for the small bit sizes used for scale modeling.

Rick

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, June 09, 2019 6:02 PM

ejhammer
I remember where the wood handled ones were from. https://www.zonatool.net/cat/hand-tools/pin-vises-and-miniature-twist-drills/ EJ
 

Zona! There's a name I'd forgotten.....quality stuff.

Thanks for the link, I have bookmarked so hopefully I won't forget again.

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Wyoming Michigan
Posted by ejhammer on Sunday, June 09, 2019 3:42 PM
I remember where the wood handled ones were from. https://www.zonatool.net/cat/hand-tools/pin-vises-and-miniature-twist-drills/ EJ

Completed - 1/525 Round Two Lindberg repop of T2A tanker done as USS MATTAPONI, USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa Dec 1942, USS Yorktown 1/700 Trumpeter 1943. In The Yards - USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa 1945, USS ESSEX 1/700 Dragon 1944, USS ESSEX 1/700 Trumpeter 1945, USS ESSEX 1/540 Revell (vintage) 1962, USS ESSEX 1/350 Trumpeter 1942, USS ESSEX LHD-2 as commissioned, converted from USS Wasp kit Gallery Models. Plus 35 other plastic and wood ship kits.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Saturday, June 08, 2019 8:09 PM

ejhammer
I've seen ball handled ones with wood handles too but don't remember where. The plastic handled ones came from Micromark. They feel good in my hand and have a nice weight too. EJ
 

Thanks for letting me know where they came from. I appreciate it. Toast

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Wyoming Michigan
Posted by ejhammer on Saturday, June 08, 2019 8:07 PM

I've seen ball handled ones with wood handles too but don't remember where. The plastic handled ones came from Micromark. They feel good in my hand and have a nice weight too. They came with 3 or 4 different size collets.

EJ

Completed - 1/525 Round Two Lindberg repop of T2A tanker done as USS MATTAPONI, USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa Dec 1942, USS Yorktown 1/700 Trumpeter 1943. In The Yards - USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa 1945, USS ESSEX 1/700 Dragon 1944, USS ESSEX 1/700 Trumpeter 1945, USS ESSEX 1/540 Revell (vintage) 1962, USS ESSEX 1/350 Trumpeter 1942, USS ESSEX LHD-2 as commissioned, converted from USS Wasp kit Gallery Models. Plus 35 other plastic and wood ship kits.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Saturday, June 08, 2019 5:11 PM

ejhammer

The 3 on the right are my favorites. I use them the most. The ball fits my hand nicely and swivels. I get great control with them.

First I've seen the ball-handled pin vises. Hmmmmmm.

-Greg

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Wyoming Michigan
Posted by ejhammer on Saturday, June 08, 2019 2:40 PM

A picture is worth - well,

This is my collection of pin vices, drill bits and drills I've collected over the last 30 years or so.

The 3 on the right are my favorites. I use them the most. The ball fits my hand nicely and swivels. I get great control with them.

Number drill set #1 to #60 (High Speed steel), Small number drills #61 to #80 (high speed steel), 5 sizes of PC board drills (solid carbide). I prefer high speed steel or cobalt steel. Not used the carbides yet. Most of the cheap sets I've bought over the years are carbon steel, very brittle and mostly junk.

Storage for spares for the small number drills. Figure about $1.00 a piece or so for them. I get mine from a machinist's supply place.

Power drills. The two on the left have slower speeds. The left one was $12.00, the next was about $20.00. The Dremel has 5 speeds, but all are too fast for plastic but work great on wood and for sanding and grinding. The chuck is an aftermarket 3 jaw chuck with a 1/8" shank. The last is a Foredom cable tool like woodcarvers use. I have a foot controlled speed controller for it. It's corded and has plenty of power, easily controlled speed from about zero to 18,000 RPM. Also has the three jaw chuck with a 1/8" shank that will fit in any 1/8" chuck tool. Makes it easy to change bits. I have three of those chucks.

EJ

Completed - 1/525 Round Two Lindberg repop of T2A tanker done as USS MATTAPONI, USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa Dec 1942, USS Yorktown 1/700 Trumpeter 1943. In The Yards - USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa 1945, USS ESSEX 1/700 Dragon 1944, USS ESSEX 1/700 Trumpeter 1945, USS ESSEX 1/540 Revell (vintage) 1962, USS ESSEX 1/350 Trumpeter 1942, USS ESSEX LHD-2 as commissioned, converted from USS Wasp kit Gallery Models. Plus 35 other plastic and wood ship kits.

  • Member since
    April, 2016
Posted by GlennH on Friday, June 07, 2019 11:42 PM

RESlusher

HOOAH!!  Cool  Off Topic

1st Infantry Division (Forward), Cooke Barracks Germany, 1990 - '91 here!  Got my patch on the right sleeve during Desert Shield / Desert Storm

 

 

 

BRO 1/2 inf RTO for FO 2/33 arty, 2/28 inf RTO for FO 1/5 arty 69/70

A number Army Viet Nam scans from hundreds yet to be done:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/southwestdreams/albums/72157621855914355

Have had the great fortune to be on every side of the howitzers.

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Fort Worth, TX
Posted by RESlusher on Friday, June 07, 2019 8:13 AM

HOOAH!!  Cool  Off Topic

1st Infantry Division (Forward), Cooke Barracks Germany, 1990 - '91 here!  Got my patch on the right sleeve during Desert Shield / Desert Storm

 

 

Richard S.

On the bench:  Takom M9 ACE

On deck:  Trumpeter SA-4 Ganef

In the hole:  Who knows what's next!

 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
Posted by GlennH on Thursday, June 06, 2019 9:51 PM
Nice set of bits. I felt like throwing every one out that came with my pin vise. Junk. Even brand new ones could not get a grab and start a hole. If I knew who made the best quality ones I'd buy them for sure.

A number Army Viet Nam scans from hundreds yet to be done:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/southwestdreams/albums/72157621855914355

Have had the great fortune to be on every side of the howitzers.

  • Member since
    April, 2019
Posted by BillG56 on Monday, June 03, 2019 12:26 PM

Thank you everyone for all your replies.  It seems I have a bit more cogitating to do before making a purchase, but that's OK.

Bill

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, June 03, 2019 12:06 PM

Hi Bill,

 

Sorry this took a few days. I've been away.

Here are two pin vises that are the subject of discussion. Both are steel and both have swivel fittings on the end.

The one on the left is the split chuck type, the one on the right an open collet.

That's the one I use.

 Here's my drill set, or what's left of it. Time to order more. Notice that the bits all have the same size shank, which is a firm fit into the vise collet and it only takes a little twist to lock it in.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, June 03, 2019 8:52 AM

It's one advantage that the drill sets I like all have a uniform shank diameter. That really simplifies changing drill sizes, and reduces wear and tear on the threads that adjust the collet.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, June 03, 2019 8:48 AM

I find a steel pin vise superior to aluminum ones.  If both parts of the vise are made of aluminum, the threads do wear out pretty quickly and bind.

There is a set of four black finished steel ones that I use, and really like them- they accomodate a wide range of sizes.  I have an all aluminum one that has a swivel on end of handle that I like because of that swivel, but I keep one size drill it in all the time in order to save the threads.

The ideal one to me would be for a steel one with a wide range of collets and a swivel handle.  Haven't found one yet.  Many pin vises will not hold the smaller sized drills- it is important to me to use sizes as close to 80 as possible, say at least through 76 or 77.

 

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Wyoming Michigan
Posted by ejhammer on Sunday, June 02, 2019 10:32 AM

I like the pin vices that use collets rather than the ones that have a cross slot. The bits don't always line up right in the cross slot type and will wobble when used. I have several pin vices and have a few with the most used sizes set up so I don't have to change bits so often. Micro Mark has one with a ball head on it that fits into my palm very nicely. I added a 3 jaw chuck like a drill motor has to it to make changing bits really easy. I use that type the most. I get most my bits from a local machinery supply house that are high speed steel, the cheap ones are usually carbon steel and are really brittle. But I do have a set of those carbide ones with the collars I got from amazon. They are very sharp but somewhat brittle. All these tiny bits will break rather easily, simply because they are so tiny. You just have to get a feel for the soft touch needed. Chucking them so just the amount of bit needed is exposed from the chuck helps too. EJ

Completed - 1/525 Round Two Lindberg repop of T2A tanker done as USS MATTAPONI, USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa Dec 1942, USS Yorktown 1/700 Trumpeter 1943. In The Yards - USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa 1945, USS ESSEX 1/700 Dragon 1944, USS ESSEX 1/700 Trumpeter 1945, USS ESSEX 1/540 Revell (vintage) 1962, USS ESSEX 1/350 Trumpeter 1942, USS ESSEX LHD-2 as commissioned, converted from USS Wasp kit Gallery Models. Plus 35 other plastic and wood ship kits.

  • Member since
    July, 2018
  • From: The Deep Woods
Posted by Tickmagnet on Sunday, June 02, 2019 10:12 AM

BillG56

Bill, could you be a bit more specific as to where to purchase the South Korean sets you referred to above?  Thanks.

Bill

 

Check on this one it sounds just like what is mentioned. Not sure if it's the same brand.

https://www.hobbylinc.com/excel-swivel-head-pin-vise-with-4-chucks-hand-drill-tap-and-die-55661

 

 

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, June 02, 2019 10:06 AM

Hi Bill;

 I have a pinvise I bought over forty years ago when I did work for Timex in Little Rock,Ar. It was bought from them and it certainly has weathered the years well. It has two ends. One end will let you go through all the sizes you'd need on a model with maybe a few on the other end. It has a cap with swivel built in to cover the end you are not using .

     Now as to the bits, I buy them by the tube through Micro-Mark . I also have a cheap set I bought from Them as well that has a sliding top .Only have replaced two bits in five years . I even have some I bought from " Gasp" Harbor Freight! Surprisingly they have held up well . The other ones they speak of are excellent and long lasting. I like the collars that are color coded and tell you the size as well. I don't remember where I got those .I think at a Jewelry Show !

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, June 02, 2019 8:14 AM

I have a strong opinion about pin vises.

Most of the ones I have procured over the years are cheaply made, and more importantly the collet cross slots are off center. This results in a wobbly drill.

A few years back I needed a pin vise, ordered a couple from Tamiya. They have various sizes. They are not cheap but I'll never buy anything else again.

I haven't seen the pin vises with varous collet sizes Don is talking about, but that sounds better than buying a different pin vise for different size as I did with Tamiya. I can only use one at a time, after all.

-Greg

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Sunday, June 02, 2019 3:44 AM

I get my drill bits from e-bay, the PCB ones that steve mentions. I go for the packs of 10 the same size, as Bill says, you can go through them pretty quick.

''I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so''

On the bench: Revell 1/72nd Fw 200C-8

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by steve5 on Sunday, June 02, 2019 12:58 AM

 

  • Member since
    April, 2019
Posted by BillG56 on Sunday, June 02, 2019 12:50 AM

Bill, could you be a bit more specific as to where to purchase the South Korean sets you referred to above?  Thanks.

Bill

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, June 01, 2019 10:09 PM

Get a pin vice the has four collet sizes. Usually they are two-and-two.

As  for bits, just accept you'll go through them.

The set with the bunch in a circular base is out of date. Break one and it's all over.

S. Korea ha a bunch of sets out. The ones with the colored plastic collars. They are really sharp as hell, it is amazing.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: State of Mississippi. State motto: Virtute et armis (By valor and arms)
Posted by mississippivol on Saturday, June 01, 2019 9:53 PM
Mine is a hobbled together collection. I wouldn't go all out on one. What I'd invest in is a mini punch set like Micro Mark has. Very handy.

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