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My eyes ain't what they used to be

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  • Member since
    May 2021
My eyes ain't what they used to be
Posted by mightypudge on Friday, June 25, 2021 9:06 AM

I imagine this is not an unfamiliar sentiment around these parts. Wink

Either I'm getting older, or objects around me are getting both darker and blurrier. I am looking for recommendations on how to brighten up my work space and make things bigger for detail work. 

How have you all solved this age-old dilemma? Pics or links are welcome. 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Friday, June 25, 2021 9:42 AM

I use a LED swing arm desk lamp,and I also use an optivisor for close in work.

I found the lamp on Amazon and I got the visor at Hobby Lobby, but really these are common items available in a lot of places online or in stores.

  • Member since
    September 2020
Posted by VintageRPM on Saturday, June 26, 2021 8:37 AM

I whole-heartedly agree with Tojo72.
This is the lamp I bought from Amazon and I love it:

Neatfi XL 2

Mike

 

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Saturday, June 26, 2021 9:11 AM

A good bright lamp is essential.  Best kind are repositional so you can get lamp down close to working area.  Just like with a camera, having a high f/# gives you depth of field, important with close up work. The brighter the light the more your pupils narrow down.

For magnification I use dollar store reading glasses.  I can use up to +2.75 diopters before the extreme convergence leads to headaches.

With the optics problem solved, finger twitching now becomes the problem. Sad

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Saturday, June 26, 2021 9:39 AM

Thank You Sir!

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Saturday, June 26, 2021 10:10 AM

rocketman2000

For magnification I use dollar store reading glasses.  I can use up to +2.75 diopters before the extreme convergence leads to headaches.

Agree with Don on the readers: I landed at 2.5x, perfect magnification (though of course your mileage may vary) and can wear 'em all day with no headache or post-use vision blur. My advice also would be to go with the largest size actual lenses you can find, really makes your visible world seem 'wide open'...rather than finding yourself squinting through smaller-size 'windows.'

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: NEVER USE PHOTO BUCKET - IT'S A THREAD WRECKER.
Posted by disastermaster on Saturday, June 26, 2021 11:55 AM

Here's how I get lit.lamp-2.png

lamp-1.png

Several years ago I got one of these at the goodwill store and the other at the salvation army. Both of them had a working bulb and were a bit dusty. Brought 'em home, wiped them off and they looked and worked like new.

The good part...... got them both for a total of $10

https://i.imgur.com/Gcc59Dk.png

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, June 26, 2021 1:51 PM

I use cheap 3X readers, and I have a 2X clip-on lens that I can flip down when I need extra magnification for detail work.  Also have a 6X set of readers with a 3X flip-down lens, but that rarely gets used.  Have to close one eye when I use those though.

As for light.  I have a 300W equivalent soft white CFL over my work area for overall lighting, and I use an LED headlamp to put extra light on the subject I'm working on.  Nothing better than a headlamp...the light goes wherever you're looking.

Being able to see better had an extra benefit that I hadn't thought of.  I find that when I can see better, I don't start getting stress-induced shaking hands.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    March 2020
  • From: South Florida
Posted by Having-fun on Monday, August 16, 2021 9:27 PM

mightypudge

I imagine this is not an unfamiliar sentiment around these parts. Wink

Either I'm getting older, or objects around me are getting both darker and blurrier. I am looking for recommendations on how to brighten up my work space and make things bigger for detail work. 

How have you all solved this age-old dilemma? Pics or links are welcome. 

 

Welcome to the club!

Joe

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, August 17, 2021 8:32 AM

mightypudge

I imagine this is not an unfamiliar sentiment around these parts. Wink

Either I'm getting older, or objects around me are getting both darker and blurrier. I am looking for recommendations on how to brighten up my work space and make things bigger for detail work. 

How have you all solved this age-old dilemma? Pics or links are welcome.  

Optivisor, and a pair of inexpensive reading glasses from the drugstore, depending on the job.  For super-precise work, I need the Optivisor's loupe.

I also bought this magnifier:

https://hobbyisthaven.com/products/adjustable-5-lens-led-light-headband-magnifier-glasses

to try it out.  I like the light focused along my line of sight onto the work.  But even though it has six interchangeable lenses, it still doesn't provide the magnification that the Optivisor loupe does.  Also, I find its weight uncomfortable on the bridge of my nose.  So I don't use it that much, and I may get rid of it.

I need to have the magnification right in front of my eyes, as with a pair of glasses.  So I don't use illuminated magnifiers that mount on the bench, with the magnification right in front of the work.  I could probably get used to it, but since there's no compelling reason for me to do so, I don't look at such magnifiers.

Hope that helps!

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Tuesday, August 17, 2021 8:47 AM

I had one of those old ring light (fluorescent) magnifying lamps.  The switches on those kept wearing out (improper surge suppression from starter.  Decided to give up, bought a new LED fixture from a surplus place, uses 110 v, brighter than the fluorescent tube.  Made a swivel joint and attached it to the old lamp (took the tube out).  Works great, well positionable, and I still have the magnifier.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January 2010
Posted by rob44 on Tuesday, August 17, 2021 5:45 PM

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Tuesday, August 17, 2021 6:46 PM

Eaglecash867

I use cheap 3X readers, and I have a 2X clip-on lens that I can flip down when I need extra magnification for detail work.  Also have a 6X set of readers with a 3X flip-down lens, but that rarely gets used.  Have to close one eye when I use those though.

As for light.  I have a 300W equivalent soft white CFL over my work area for overall lighting, and I use an LED headlamp to put extra light on the subject I'm working on.  Nothing better than a headlamp...the light goes wherever you're looking.

Being able to see better had an extra benefit that I hadn't thought of.  I find that when I can see better, I don't start getting stress-induced shaking hands.

 

My hands shake at times.  Never thought of improving my light source to help with this.  

  • Member since
    January 2010
Posted by rob44 on Tuesday, August 17, 2021 7:23 PM

ALso try cutting down on caffine. That helps me a lot!

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Friday, August 20, 2021 9:30 AM

Eaglecash867
I use cheap 3X readers, and I have a 2X clip-on lens that I can flip down when I need extra magnification for detail work.

 Ditto

I tried many magnifiers and what works best for me is readers with clip on magnifiers. The magnifier is lightweight so you dont get a sore nose and ears. As for the reader, I think I got a 2.5 and I took the time to find a pair that fit comfortably, not too tight, and ones that wont be sliding off my nose. Wide rimmed frames worked best because they offered me good support while distributing the weight. Even though the clips ons are relatively light, over hours of using them, the rig can start to hurt. Good support on the readers goes a long way and pain is a thing of the past for me. 

There is one more modification I made to this system. Over hours the rig tends to slide down my nose as oils and perspiration cause it to slide. Its a nuisance but more than that it adds to getting soreness. I found a product on Amazon that solved this problem. They are rubber overlays that you install on the arms of the readers. They have a hook to them and wrap around the back side of your ears. Bam! Problem is solved. 

After a long road of trying several devices, including the ever popular optivisor, this system ended the search. I can go for hours with no pain, no readjusting, and I really like the open field of view. I need readers for standard work but for more detailed work, it is as simple as a flick of the magnifier to bring down magnification. No muss no fuss.

 

Eaglecash867
. As for light.  I have a 300W equivalent soft white CFL over my work area for overall lighting,

Ditto

I prefer overall lighting as well because it floods the bench making the work experience more enjoyable and efficient. It is easier to find things too. The fixture aso provides me great illumination for imaging the model. Lastly, it doesnt add to the clutter as a desk mount or desk stand might. Just my preference though.

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Saturday, August 21, 2021 9:07 AM

Bakster

 

 

 

I prefer overall lighting as well because it floods the bench making the work experience more enjoyable and efficient. It is easier to find things too. The fixture aso provides me great illumination for imaging the model. Lastly, it doesnt add to the clutter as a desk mount or desk stand might. Just my preference though.

 

As do I.  Earlier in the year I replaced the fluorescent shop light with an LED one, which was much brighter.  Then I took the fluorescent ring light out of my positionable magnifier light and bolted on an LED fixture with a dozen LEDs, so I now have a bright shop as well as a bright workbench light.  Really bright LEDs are now going for reasonable prices.  I replaced my garage light with a 6000 lumen light for ten bucks.  If I had seen that item before I replaced the shop light I would have bought that for the shop.  The shop light was only 2000 lumens and was twenty buck!  Still, the 2000 lumens does light the shop well.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, August 21, 2021 9:16 AM

VintageRPM

I whole-heartedly agree with Tojo72.
This is the lamp I bought from Amazon and I love it:

Neatfi XL 2

Mike

 

 

Ditto

I got this same lamp for my workspace and my wifes.  Fantastic.

 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Saturday, August 21, 2021 9:32 AM
I was at Hobby Lobby and for $19.00 I switched over to the visor with the light replacing the plain one,and that really helps,it's a little heavy,but I don't leave it on for extended times.

  • Member since
    June 2017
Posted by Chemteacher on Sunday, September 12, 2021 10:55 AM
I use the Optivisor with my normal cheater/readers of 2.50x for detail work. It works well but I have to take breaks to prevent headaches. For lighting, I have an LED shoplight overhead, an LED under cabinet-type light under the shelf that I keep some of my paints and supplies on, and a small adjustable arm desk lamp with a daylight LED bulb. This setup works well, but I’m thinking on finding a way to get even more light.

On the bench: Revell-USS Arizona; Revell 1/25th Kenworth

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Sunday, September 12, 2021 11:46 AM

Yes, many of us have the same problem with high power cheaters.  The problem is when your eyes converge that far, you are really straining the muscles that provide convergence.  Better magnifiers, such as the visor type have prisms ground into the lenses to provide an optical convergence so that your eyes can relax a bit.  I have both 1.75 and 2.5 power readers, and only use the 2.5X pair when I really need it- but if I have a job requiring that pair I am limited to half hour also.

Another tip I am learning after cateract surgery is the importance of bright bench lighting.  After cateract surgery you lose most of the ability to focus, but your pupils still open or close.  When you are in dim light, the pupils still open way up (low f/#) giving you such a short depth of field that normal head movement takes you in and out of focus.  Having a light as bright as possible allows your pupils to stop down and gives you a much better depth of field.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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