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Filler?

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  • Member since
    August, 2015
Filler?
Posted by Dolphin24 on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 1:53 PM

I'm in the market for filler. I've been using hobbylite and it's messy and difficult to work with. I'm just looking for recommendations for some filler and maybe some filling tools that are less messy and easier to work.

 

Thanks in advance

  • Member since
    April, 2004
Posted by Jon_a_its on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 2:37 AM

Lots of options, Bondo/3M body putty/Halfords' Knifing Putty, pretty much the same thing, feathers really well for sanding.

My Favourite is Deluxe Materiels Perfect Plastic, brill, works with water, doesn't affect plastic, loads of info on their website. 

D'oh linky thing not working url here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stLzShlnrEk

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 9:30 AM

I use auto body putty, used to be called spot putty, now called glazing putty. Isn't any easier to work with, but is cheaper (the tubes are big.  Price is high but price per ounce is low).

I use a palette knife for puttying large areas or cracks, toothpicks for small areas.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 11:02 AM

I used to use Squadron Green. The problems I had were that it shrinks when it cures, and cracks. The plus is that its pretty easy to work with, smooth and sand.

I used Tamiya Gray for a while. The problems were that it is expensive, and not really suitable for big gaps. The plus again is that it can be smoothed out nicely and sands pretty well.

I have tried using CA Superglue. I can't get that to work at all as a filler. the problem is timing, wait too long and it cures harder than the model, making it impossible to sand.

Currently I use "Bondo", which I think Don S. is referring to. It comes in a toothpaste sized tube, not too expensive, really easy to sand out.

I haven't tried the products "Mr. Surfacer" because it isn't sold in my state I think.

  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by Marcus McBean on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 2:27 PM

They have Bondo in a tube?  I purchase a can to fill all the seams on my ship, but once I add the binder I only have like three minutes to apply it before it sets up.  I am alway working with small batches which is a pain as the model is almost 4 feet long.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, November 05, 2015 10:04 AM

There are several types of products called Bondo- it is a brand name for car body work products.  They make both a catalyzed polyester filler and the tube type evaporative type.

There are many brands of the later type, which is indeed what I use though I use Ditzler brand.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, November 05, 2015 1:12 PM

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Sunday, November 08, 2015 2:06 PM

I second the Perfect Plastic Putty, applies nicely, haven't experienced shrinking/cracking, (yet.) For very large filling areas, I still prefer the bondo with hardener. It's there to stay, zero shrinkage, sands well. 

The spot/glazing putty's did seem to shrink a bit, if used on larger areas. But I might have been using it in places it wasn't intended for.

Among my dental tools I have a double ended spatula shaped tool, one rounded like a spade, one flat edges. The spade end I bent a bit, about 20 degrees, that works really well for application. 

And like Don S. for small spots a toothpick works great for me, really easy to accurately "roll" putty into place.

Patrick

  • Member since
    December, 2002
Posted by 7474 on Sunday, November 08, 2015 4:45 PM

Just came across a video on youtube discribing the use of Dental Acrylic, the thing I like is the use of Dental powder with thick CA. Here's the video, what do you guys think?  

http://paulbudzik.com/tools-techniques/Outside%20the%20Box/scale_modeling_addtional_information.html

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaXWFM6zbLc

 

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by steve5 on Tuesday, February 02, 2016 4:30 AM

is there a putty that can be applied with a syringe like applicator for very thin lines ,

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, February 02, 2016 9:15 AM

I use enamels for painting, and occasionally when a bottle has been used for awhile the remaining paint gets pretty thick. I have used that for "filling" very small, fine seams, and it works fine.  I apply it with my smallest brush or a toothpick.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February, 2013
Posted by tomwatkins45 on Saturday, February 06, 2016 3:52 PM

Vallejo Plastic Putty comes in small tube with a very fine applicator tip. It will put down a line of putty approx. 1/32" wide. It can be smoothed very well with a damp (water) Q-tip. I've just started using it a few months ago and so far, I really like it.

Tom

  • Member since
    December, 2009
  • From: West Chester,Ohio
Posted by roger_wilco on Monday, February 08, 2016 8:31 AM

steve5

is there a putty that can be applied with a syringe like applicator for very thin lines ,

 

Steve,

I would highly recommend Vallejo Plastic Putty as it comes in a small tube with a thin applicator. What I do is apply a bead of putty and then let it dry.Drying times are short and usually under an hour. I then use cotton swabs dipped in 91% rubbing alcohol. With patience you can achieve a very smooth,filled gap with no sanding involved. The nice thing is that with no sanding needed, you won't wipe out any adjacent detail on the parts. I buy this product at Hobbytown USA but it's easy to find on eBay as well. I hope this helps and good luck on your projects.

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by steve5 on Monday, February 08, 2016 10:38 PM

thank's roger and tom , I have been looking at that on ebay

  • Member since
    February, 2013
Posted by tomwatkins45 on Tuesday, February 09, 2016 6:02 PM

The Vallejo putty is good stuff. The more I use it the better I like it. Free Time Hobbies in Blue Ridge Ga ( right down the road from me) also has it.

Tom

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Thursday, February 11, 2016 12:50 PM

Hi;

 I use what I call " Gloop ". It is a mix of Plastic Glue and sprue . I have three bottles . One thin .( more glue than sprue ).Medium , About fifty-fifty glue to sprue ratio and finally the " Oomph " which is 3/4 sprue and 1/4 glue and real stiff .

     The reason I like this is simple . Being plastic and glue it sticks like crazy and when you sand you can't tell the difference in surfaces when done . Plus No Shrinkage !

        I have used this stuff for over forty years now with no problems !    T.B. 

  • Member since
    September, 2009
Posted by Cobra 427 on Monday, March 07, 2016 11:55 PM

Here, people - this may sound like a stupid suggestion, but it works for me. ELMERS' Brand woodfiller - it's water based, but dries hard, sands easily, and can be used on just about anything you can think of! I use this ALL THE TIME, and it is easy to use, and cleans up as well as sands easily. It only takes about fifteen minutes to dry, and doesn't crack like most modeling putty when it cures. There're no harsh chemicals, or odors. It's cheap, and you can buy it just about anywhere. I've used the Bondo body filler, and spot putty - both of which are intended for use with steel, and only for 1/16" inch deep gouges, and dents and not for modeling. The red spot putty cracks too easily, and doesn't wear well as this stuff crumbles, and it's too soft for any thick application as it's made from gypsum, and doesn't dry quickly - it's too indifferent to plastic, and it needs to be thinned with acetone when it gets onto something you don't want it to be - your hands!

Try the Elmers' I guarantee that you'll never use anything else again. I only use Bondo body filler for junk electric guitar bodies that have been routed in an attempt to retrofit other pickups/parts, or chiseled horribly by someone who wasn't a luthier. I also only use it outside since it smells up the entire house! It's also meant to stick to anything it touches. The woodfiller can be thinned to whatever consistency you need with water if it gets too thick, or can't be smoothed easily. You can also wash it off with soap and water - try that with Bondo!

 

~ Cobra Chris

Maybe a picture of a squirrel playing a harmonica will make you feel better?

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2007
Posted by mitsdude on Friday, April 01, 2016 2:16 AM

When buying Bondo in a tube make sure it looks like the one in the picture.  They sell a tube of this stuff that is a two part mix. If the package has a second smaller tube in with the big one then you have the wrong one.

The packaging and colors are very similar.

GMorrison

 

  • Member since
    September, 2009
Posted by Cobra 427 on Friday, April 01, 2016 12:46 PM

mitsdude

When buying Bondo in a tube make sure it looks like the one in the picture.  They sell a tube of this stuff that is a two part mix. If the package has a second smaller tube in with the big one then you have the wrong one.

The packaging and colors are very similar.

  

Let me reiterate: the red stuff in the tube is too soft, and brittle. It crumbles too easily! The other stuff that you're referring to is Bondo body filler which is two parts. It's not the same as the spot putty that you have pictured. Both spot putty, and Bondo stink to high heaven, and are chemical based. Not recommended for modeling inside, or for small jobs that require finesse, and the ability to breathe without a respirator. Elmers' is easy to use, easy to clean up, and dries hard without any odors, or health issues. No chemicals needed to clean your hands, or your project! Just try it, and see for yourself. You won't want to use Bondo brand, or any other autobody type filler, or spot putty again! It's not brittle, and it doesn't shrink like spot putty. If it starts to dry you can add WATER to it, and not worry about it marring your model unlike spot putty, and NO ODOR!

 

~ Cobra Chris

Maybe a picture of a squirrel playing a harmonica will make you feel better?

 

 

  • Member since
    April, 2007
  • From: Canada
Posted by JTRACING on Sunday, April 03, 2016 8:57 AM

I use the bondo glazing putty also, works great. Can be mixed wth liquid glue also to use like you would a mr surfacer.

something new you might have seen on tv commercials recently is that bondic stuff that you cure with a uv light. It's available at lots of stores now like Walmart etc.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, April 03, 2016 11:01 AM

While I don't use bondo, I use other brands of glazing (used to be spot) putty.  Never been bothered by it being too brittle or other problems.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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