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Best Masking material for curves. Tape or Putty

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  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 6:53 AM

Hi;

      Well, I guess there's no static way to do this. Myself, I take Automotive Striping tape. lay it down and burnish . Then I come back with wider tape for the covering and paper layers. 

       Now, On ships I do this. I put  the ship onto my upside down craft clamp( Large). Specially made for this . It has a Bubble level built in in two directions. Fore and Aft and Port and Starboard.

     I then bring my pencil striping jig to the hull surface after all is level( Both Ways) then mark it off. Then sliding the jig gently down the length of the ship I mark the top of the stripe. Then I do this for the bottom edge too.

    This way all lines are straight when viewed from the Bow or the Stern. As " G " said ,there's no easy way on the stern. It is what it is. For practice find a " Glue Bomb " Tug Boat. Best difficult stern shape there is. ( The older style Tug ), Practice with that and you'll darned near be able to eyeball your lines.

       Having done Auto striping for a few years I got where I could get an almost perfect one freehand. Oh, to be able to do that now . Today they look like waves! LOL.LOL.

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: West of the rock and east of the hard place!
Posted by murph on Monday, November 18, 2019 8:43 AM

3m Nexcare tape.  It's amazing.  It's about one inch wide and you can cut it into strips as wide as you like.  You can get it at Walmart or any drug store.  It can be sticky so I suggest that before you apply it to your painted surface, you remove some of the tackiness by placing the sticky side down on your pants once or twice.  It's great for compund curves.

Retired and living the dream!

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, November 18, 2019 8:26 AM

Phil_H

There's also a relatively new "masking tape for curves" available from Tamiya. As the name implies, you can curve it on the surface and it will remain flat. Looks like you can get some pretty tight curves (depending on the width of the tape)

 

Might have to try some of this stuff soon.

 

I tried some and did not like it.  One thing many of us like about the regular Tamiya tape is its low adhesion.  But with this thin stuff the stretchiness and low adhesion work against each other. If I allow it to stretch on a curve, there is a tendency for the curve to become a chord line- that is, to straighten out part of the curve because of the stretch tension. I put it down and it looks fine, but by the time I get the airbrush all ready, it has pulled back into some straight line segments.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July 2019
Posted by Bob D on Monday, November 18, 2019 12:05 AM

Thanks for the help. Never knew about stretching the tape.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, November 8, 2019 2:38 AM

Good point - I have all three of these and they are fantastic for bending around curves.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Friday, November 8, 2019 2:31 AM

There's also a relatively new "masking tape for curves" available from Tamiya. As the name implies, you can curve it on the surface and it will remain flat. Looks like you can get some pretty tight curves (depending on the width of the tape)

Might have to try some of this stuff soon.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, November 7, 2019 10:41 PM

One thing I've come to believe in is that masking is like math. 

Calculus. More specifically diffential calculus. The degree to which you can define a equation or conclusion with elements that may approach the infintesimal.

Case in point. Rather than define the perimeter of a masked area with the non painted area as a single solution; define the perimeter as a line including curves and then define the non paited area behind it as small bits to follow the area.

I model ships mostly. Painting horizonal vs. vertical is easy to control.

Painting horizontal stripes on the compound curves of aI spent a couple of hours setting up the boot stripe on Midway. At the risk of boring those who know, I offer this miny toot..

 I spent a couple of hours setting up the boot stripe on Midway. At the risk of boring those who know, I offer this miny toot.

Ignore the tape because I staged this after I marked the hull, but set a pencil where you want to draw a line for the boot topping. You will do this twice. Once at the top and once at the bottom.

A boot topping or stripe is not a constant width, if you will. It has a top line and a bottom line that are parallel in vertical axis.

 I sometimes use pieces of Tamiya tape about 2mm by 2mm and arrange them around the curve,

  • Member since
    July 2019
Posted by Bob D on Thursday, November 7, 2019 10:28 PM

Yellow stripe decals sound like the answer. Thanks

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, November 7, 2019 3:37 PM

Using putty results in a soft edge, good for camo but not for stripes.

I paint a lot of waterline stripes ( boot toppings) on steel navy models. It can get pretty tricky under the stern.

I usually make strips of Tamiya yellow about 1/32” wide with a straight edge and a razor blade.

once you get that where you want it and rubbed down well, come behind it with some more that’s wider, and so forth.

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, November 6, 2019 11:32 PM

I like tape for the hard, straight lines like you did for your ordinance.  I use putty for softer edge cammo.

Or the ordinance, maybe glosscoat, tape then airbrush light coats.  

Decals are an option as well.  Theres a couple of manufacturers that make different width color stripes.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    July 2019
Best Masking material for curves. Tape or Putty
Posted by Bob D on Wednesday, November 6, 2019 11:19 PM

Just built a A-1 skyraider and had trouble masking the curves on wings and body. Also the yellow lines on the bombs were very difficult to get down without paint getting under the tape. I was using Tamiya masking tape. Is the putty easier to work with.   Thanks.

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