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SLS Launch

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GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
SLS Launch
Posted by GAF on Monday, August 29, 2022 5:42 AM

The SLS (Space Launch System) is scheduled for 8:33 EDT (7:33 CDT).

You can watch here: https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/#public

Will it be delayed?  Going by NASA's track record... probably.

Gary

P.S.> Launch scrubbed for today.

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Monday, August 29, 2022 4:00 PM

Yes, it is delayed indefinately.  Problems with one of the engines.

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, August 29, 2022 4:00 PM

Launch was postponed until Friday. I got up at oh dark thirty to watch... Indifferent At least Fridays projected launch time is midday in FLA, so it won't be so early as today out here in the Southwest.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Monday, August 29, 2022 10:43 PM

I wonder if it will launch this year.  Instead of a solidly engineered product, it seems like something a bunch of 6th graders cobbled together, stuck a fuse in and hoped for the best.

If it doesn't blow up on the pad, or fail to reach orbit, I'll be greatly suprised!

Gary

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Tuesday, August 30, 2022 9:54 AM

GAF

I wonder if it will launch this year.  Instead of a solidly engineered product, it seems like something a bunch of 6th graders cobbled together, stuck a fuse in and hoped for the best.

If it doesn't blow up on the pad, or fail to reach orbit, I'll be greatly suprised!

Gary

 

I thought that at first too- same ol same ol.  But the more I read up on it the more that feeling went away.  I still don't like parachute landings in water, but the new booster, and particularly the Orion capsule are pretty much state of the art.

I don't consider using the shuttle engines and lengthened booster a problem.  Those were very reliable with a good record.

 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Tuesday, August 30, 2022 12:41 PM

Well, it's not easy - it's rocket science after all.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Tuesday, August 30, 2022 2:05 PM

   I am super excited for this, I remember the first moon shot, I agree with Real G it IS rocket science.

     I also don't think that there is anything wrong with recycling old shuttle parts to make this project work, why re invent the wheel while your re inventing the wheel. Those "fiddly bits" have been payed for for years and since the shuttle program has been decomissioned why not use those parts. Wanna pay retail for a new rocket motor?

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by modelcrazy on Tuesday, August 30, 2022 2:47 PM

I'm stoked about it. I think Space X could do a better job than the government but it's a conglomeration of diffrent countries so maybe it'll work.

Steve

Building a kit from your stash is like cutting a head off a Hydra, two more take it's place.

 

 

http://www.spamodeler.com/forum/

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, August 30, 2022 6:58 PM

Thanks,

John

GAF
  • Member since
    June 2012
  • From: Anniston, AL
Posted by GAF on Wednesday, August 31, 2022 1:32 AM

Don,

I bow to your experience.  However, I still feel uneasy about those solid rocket boosters strapped to the side.  They're alright for unmanned flights, where all you will lose is a few hundred million dollars of equipment, but for manned flights...

Once they're ignited, there's no shutting them off.  There was one instance where the circuits failed on the hold down bolt initiators for the shuttle (STS 112 I believe).  Luckily, the backups worked.  I would feel better if they had a couple of Falcon-9s strapped on instead.

I wish NASA good luck with this one!

Gary

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Saturday, September 3, 2022 5:19 PM

Second time's the charm?  Or wait, what try is this?  I lost count.

To be fair, Space X has charged ahead with numerous spectacular fails, something NASA is most definitely not known for (or at least is not their M.O.).

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Saturday, September 3, 2022 6:22 PM

  The booster problem was a " swiss cheese" event. NASA was under pressure to launch, the chain of command failed to listen to lower engineers about the cold and O rings. One of the few gov't agencies who actually learned from their mistakes. Scrub as many times as you wish to get the best possible outcome, I still think it is AWESOME we will put another human being on another world.

   If I recall they also had issues with the last " tried and true launch systems....all unmanned thank what ever you thank.

   It does bear to question where are those billionaire philanthropists???

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Sunday, September 4, 2022 8:50 AM

I remember the early days when scrubbed launches were far more common that successful ones.  I remember all the Vanguard delays, and then that actual launch of several feet followed by a massive explosion.  I remember the many delays of Mercury and Gemini launches.  Artemis is bringing to mind that era!  But than, it is not yet a proven and tested vehicle.  It will advance, and end up okay.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Sunday, September 4, 2022 9:33 AM

   I agree Don,  the Artimus platform is a new design and with that comes unforseen errors. Please do not take my last post as a disregard for the amazing technology involved with cobbling together leftover parts that are proven individually however have never been in service together. I think of it as " kitbashing". We will see success however patience is prudent.

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Sunday, September 4, 2022 11:47 AM

Rocket science IS hard - and the grading curve is very steep.  If you pass, you get to go into space.  If you fail, they have a barbecue in your name.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

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