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Formative modeling memories, mishaps and disasters

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  • Member since
    January 2021
Formative modeling memories, mishaps and disasters
Posted by JoeSMG on Sunday, March 26, 2023 9:40 AM

More than a few of my earliest clear memories involve models: getting, building, destroying and losing them. Many of them, like TankerBuilder's post in the "turd" thread, involved holidays or birthdays. I'm guessing at least on this forum. I'm not alone.

The one that came to mind after reading TB's post was my first Christmas after getting my paper rout, I’d just turned 12. My single mom had five kids and two jobs, so Christmas ‘twas the season for getting new socks and underwear, not toys or models. I was discouraged from spending my new found paper rout wealth on such frivolous things as models. There was no outright ban but the snarky remarks and guilt prevented those purchases fairly effectively.

But just before that first Christmas after getting "a job" I had an idea, a marvelously devious idea! I'd finally have a Christmas like my friends told tales of. Of unwrapping gifts that weren't undergarments or sweaters! I would buy two or three models with my paper rout money, secretly wrap them up and put them anonymously under the tree, labeled simply - "To: Joey" I had 4 older sibling 3 of whom had decent after school jobs - all would be guilted into silence knowing they hadn't bought me anything, no questions would be asked.

And none ever were, my plan worked perfectly. This memory haunts me, I wish I’d bought my mom something nice instead, and after that Christmas I did - or at least I tried to... My poor mom ended up with all manner of useless things a teenage boy though it would be cool to get.

- Joe the SMG

  • Member since
    July 2015
Posted by MR TOM SCHRY on Sunday, March 26, 2023 10:50 AM

JoeSMG,

I'm like you in that many of my favorite childhood memories involved getting models as gifts.  My two older brothers built models too so it was great watching each other unwrap a present and seeing what kit was there.

tjs

TJS

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Sunday, March 26, 2023 11:27 AM

That's a great story.  I remember one Christmas my neigbors got me the 1/72 monogram B-52.  The box was massive wrapped under the tree and I couldn't wait to open it.  For Easter my mom would get a chocolate bunny and a model.  I think she gave me the Revell Arizona a couple times lol.  Very fond model memories.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    January 2021
Posted by JoeSMG on Sunday, March 26, 2023 11:29 AM

One of my earliest model memories is mentioned in my profile:
"... I was 7ish when my brother bought me two ship models (he let me chose) for my birthday, the Bismarck and Hood. That started me on a lifelong fascination with ships and model building in general."

He was probably 16 at the time but never built models himself. I remember him telling me what he was going to do and the long walk from our home to downtown where my favorite department store (with the best toy section) was: Centers. I remember agonizing over the model I'd get. I don't remember exactly how I ended up with the Revell Bismarck and Airfix hood, I think I liked the artwork? I know I picked Bismarck and maybe my brother told me about and added the Hood - that would have been like him. Anyway the die was cast.

- Joe the SMG

  • Member since
    January 2021
Posted by JoeSMG on Sunday, March 26, 2023 11:49 AM

keavdog

That's a great story.  I remember one Christmas my neigbors got me the 1/72 monogram B-52.  The box was massive wrapped under the tree and I couldn't wait to open it.  For Easter my mom would get a chocolate bunny and a model.  I think she gave me the Revell Arizona a couple times lol.  Very fond model memories.

 

No way - I have a tragic gift story around the Monogram B-52! Big Smile
I was probably 14 and My 19 year old sister totally floored me with a gift of that model on my birthday!

I loved that bird! Spent all weekend building and painting her up. Come Monday morning I had to tear myself away from my 99% done beautiful "Turd"! (crossover threading!) I must have seen some little thing I wanted to touch up and broke out the paints to do so before dashing off (no doubt late) for school. I thought about my new prized possession all through classes and couldn't wait to go home and see her again.


When I did, I was greeted by my enraged sister... apparently I had left the paintbrush I had used for the touchup in a ginormous open bottle of thinner and her beloved cat Jason had got into my room, nocked it off my book self and spilt it all over himself. When she found him he was still trying to lick it off... Thinking I had killed her cat with the stupid gift she had given me, her wrath immediately fixated on it. (Likely because I hadn't gotten home yet!) She threw it to the floor and stomped it into a million pieces.

On the bright side the cat was fine.

 

- Joe the SMG

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Naples, FL
Posted by tempestjohnny on Sunday, March 26, 2023 2:40 PM

I have two memories burned into my head.

 

The first was building the USS Kittyhawk, I was probably 11 or 12. Was painting all those little tiny sea blue planes. Proceeded to spill an entire bottle of enamel blue over my bare legs. Dad had to use thinner to clean my legs and then a good soaking in the tub to get that smell off.

 

Number two was better. I was 14 or 15 and Fujimi had just started releasing their F-4 Phantoms. For Christmas that was all I wanted, didn't matter which one, but I wanted a Phantom.  Dad would spoil both me and my brother at Christmas.  He ended up buying me 7 different Fujimi Phantoms. I was phloored and ecstatic. There are 4 of them in this pic on my parents kitchen table

 

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: On my kitchen counter top somewhere in North Carolina.
Posted by disastermaster on Sunday, March 26, 2023 4:25 PM

Mishaps?

Learning the hard waybreaking heart emoticonat about six or so that you can't use elmer's glue on plastic models

Sherman-Jumbo-1945

"I never know what to expect here anymore."

 

 
  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Monday, March 27, 2023 8:22 AM

As a kid, I remember getting model kits from relatives starting about age five. I could read at that age, but my compehension was not good enough to actually build the kit.  These were all bala and tissue flying models.  I finally completed the first when I was seven.  It was a Guillows kit. Subseqently my local dime store carried a a lot of Comet kits.

I was about Ten when plastic kits became available.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January 2021
Posted by JoeSMG on Monday, March 27, 2023 9:21 PM

missileman2000

As a kid, I remember getting model kits from relatives starting about age five. I could read at that age, but my compehension was not good enough to actually build the kit.  These were all bala and tissue flying models.  I finally completed the first when I was seven.  It was a Guillows kit. Subseqently my local dime store carried a a lot of Comet kits.

I was about Ten when plastic kits became available.

 

d

I remember those kits, they were still around when I was a kid but plastic was taking over. I always thought they were more works of art than models. I'd still like to try my hand at one. An excellent and appropriate use of Elmers glue Disastermaster!

- Joe the SMG

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Tuesday, March 28, 2023 8:46 AM

JoeSMG

 

 
missileman2000

As a kid, I remember getting model kits from relatives starting about age five. I could read at that age, but my compehension was not good enough to actually build the kit.  These were all bala and tissue flying models.  I finally completed the first when I was seven.  It was a Guillows kit. Subseqently my local dime store carried a a lot of Comet kits.

I was about Ten when plastic kits became available.

 

 

 

d

 

I remember those kits, they were still around when I was a kid but plastic was taking over. I always thought they were more works of art than models. I'd still like to try my hand at one. An excellent and appropriate use of Elmers glue Disastermaster!

 

Actually, Guillows is still producing kits.  They make a few simple kits, but their specialty is high end complex kits, lile B-25, Stearman and such.  While they are supposed to be paper covered, metal prototypes can be covered with card stock or thin styrene to create a nice scale model.  Since they are supposed to fly, the horizontal tail is somewhat enlarged, so you may want to scratch those pieces.

 

  • Member since
    December 2022
  • From: Canada
Posted by Tcoat on Tuesday, March 28, 2023 9:00 AM

missileman2000

 

 
JoeSMG

 

 
missileman2000

As a kid, I remember getting model kits from relatives starting about age five. I could read at that age, but my compehension was not good enough to actually build the kit.  These were all bala and tissue flying models.  I finally completed the first when I was seven.  It was a Guillows kit. Subseqently my local dime store carried a a lot of Comet kits.

I was about Ten when plastic kits became available.

 

 

 

d

 

I remember those kits, they were still around when I was a kid but plastic was taking over. I always thought they were more works of art than models. I'd still like to try my hand at one. An excellent and appropriate use of Elmers glue Disastermaster!

 

 

 

Actually, Guillows is still producing kits.  They make a few simple kits, but their specialty is high end complex kits, lile B-25, Stearman and such.  While they are supposed to be paper covered, metal prototypes can be covered with card stock or thin styrene to create a nice scale model.  Since they are supposed to fly, the horizontal tail is somewhat enlarged, so you may want to scratch those pieces.

 

 

We have a local shop that still carries the full line up of these kits. Never counted but i bet there are more than 20 of them from the most basic little rubber band flyers

To the massive P-38

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Tuesday, March 28, 2023 12:54 PM

The posts about gifts above triggered a memory I'd never really processed before: that most of the earliest 'gift' models from friends and siblings in my formative years (1960s) were Lindberg kits...plentiful at the local five-and-dime, affordable to young gift-givers' allowances, with exciting action-packed box art...and kits inside that usually failed dismally to remotely resemble the real thing or those exciting cover illustrations. Kits from adult relatives, on the other hand -- and those I would purchase for myself, as I got deeper into the hobby -- were the more 'up-scale' and vastly-better-quality Monogram, Revell and Airfix kits.

The 'punch line' is that I still buy, build -- and enjoy -- those execrable old Lindberg kits, on occasion, both for nostalgia and for the fun of turning the proverbial sows' ears into (faux-fabric) 'silk purses.' It's actually perversely fun now to open the box, and see how crappy those kits can be, when it doesn't come as a shocking surprise.

But...to give the real props to Lindberg that I always feel compelled to do...they had some of the more unique and 'oddball' subjects for their kits (mostly ships) that were around. Few other mainstream manufacturers tackled Civil War ships, Coast Guard boats, minesweepers, assault craft and...WTF?...inshore fire support ships, like Lindberg did. Sure, they were always in some bizarre scale like 1/373...deck guns might be molded as lumpy rectangular blocks...and, yeah, every single hull surface seemed to have the same weird 'waffle iron' hull plating...but their range is still a treasure-trove of 'stuff you don't see anywhere else' -- and usually at quite reasonable prices.

So there. Big Smile

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    December 2022
  • From: Canada
Posted by Tcoat on Tuesday, March 28, 2023 2:13 PM

gregbale

The posts about gifts above triggered a memory I'd never really processed before: that most of the earliest 'gift' models from friends and siblings in my formative years (1960s) were Lindberg kits...plentiful at the local five-and-dime, affordable to young gift-givers' allowances, with exciting action-packed box art...and kits inside that usually failed dismally to remotely resemble the real thing or those exciting cover illustrations. Kits from adult relatives, on the other hand -- and those I would purchase for myself, as I got deeper into the hobby -- were the more 'up-scale' and vastly-better-quality Monogram, Revell and Airfix kits.

The 'punch line' is that I still buy, build -- and enjoy -- those execrable old Lindberg kits, on occasion, both for nostalgia and for the fun of turning the proverbial sows' ears into (faux-fabric) 'silk purses.' It's actually perversely fun now to open the box, and see how crappy those kits can be, when it doesn't come as a shocking surprise.

But...to give the real props to Lindberg that I always feel compelled to do...they had some of the more unique and 'oddball' subjects for their kits (mostly ships) that were around. Few other mainstream manufacturers tackled Civil War ships, Coast Guard boats, minesweepers, assault craft and...WTF?...inshore fire support ships, like Lindberg did. Sure, they were always in some bizarre scale like 1/373...deck guns might be molded as lumpy rectangular blocks...and, yeah, every single hull surface seemed to have the same weird 'waffle iron' hull plating...but their range is still a treasure-trove of 'stuff you don't see anywhere else' -- and usually at quite reasonable prices.

So there. Big Smile

 

I also have a soft spot for the old Lindberg Ship models. Mostly for the same reasons you said. I am pretty sure that some were sculpted from a single fadded, off angle, photograph and I love them for it! 

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