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What's current state of plastic modeling hobby?

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  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Thursday, January 21, 2021 2:46 PM

We are in the Golden Age of Scale Modeling.There is an explosion of highly detailed kits in every genre, loads of aftermarket accessories and dozens of paint and weathering supply companies.Never mind Tigers,Panthers,Sherman’s, Mustangs, and Spitfires.There are many obscure kits we wouldn’t have dreamed of decades ago.The internet is full of information and forums, and magazine racks still have many magazines for sale.

No doubt this is the best of times for our hobby.

  • Member since
    June 2010
Posted by montague on Thursday, January 21, 2021 2:35 PM

scared and confused

To answer Q1, I believe there is still a large community of modelers, just not as you might know it. At my highschool there are a handful of people into the hobby but  less the cars, planes, trains and boats that you may be used to. They are instead interested in the newer warhammer and other rp games (some are based on the devil itself, video games) have a huge following of younger people. The hobby is simply evolving like any good community. If there was no change I think even veterans would move on from the hobby, imagine if you couldnt order that one really obsure paint that is crucial to your model online and had to luck out in a store or simply take an L and mix it yourself. Kids these days also just have a lot more school to worry about, more exams, more homework. Less freedom from parents also meanas some kids just cant get model kits. 

 

Thanks for the post I hope the gaming commmunity does grow a lot and you get into it!

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, January 21, 2021 9:48 AM

You bring up an interesting point Scared, the gaming community. Not the video gamers, but the folks who play their games with physical pieces that they build and paint. Those have been around for decades, although some of the games have faded into obscurity. Star Fleet Battles and Micro Armor are two that I can think of that do not have the followings that they once did. You could call gaming a cousin of scale modeling, related, but still different. The gaming builds tend to be more robust in construction. 

As for school... well all I can say is make the most of it and enjoy what you can. I wish I hadn’t been in such a hurry to grow up, and had spent more time reveling in being a kid. In a few years life gets a lot harder for most folks when you have to take on the tasks of feeding yourself, paying the bills to put a roof over your own head, and the job necessary to do such things. The spare time and cash for a hobby or activity becomes a true luxury.

 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    January 2021
Posted by scared and confused on Thursday, January 21, 2021 5:29 AM

To answer Q1, I believe there is still a large community of modelers, just not as you might know it. At my highschool there are a handful of people into the hobby but  less the cars, planes, trains and boats that you may be used to. They are instead interested in the newer warhammer and other rp games (some are based on the devil itself, video games) have a huge following of younger people. The hobby is simply evolving like any good community. If there was no change I think even veterans would move on from the hobby, imagine if you couldnt order that one really obsure paint that is crucial to your model online and had to luck out in a store or simply take an L and mix it yourself. Kids these days also just have a lot more school to worry about, more exams, more homework. Less freedom from parents also meanas some kids just cant get model kits. 

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 2:54 PM

My grandfather gave me cutting pliers similar to these:

www.lowes.com/pd_445713-48246-KDT82000_4294857582__|1&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNs%3Dp_product_qty_sales_dollar%7C1&facetInfo=

I still use them to this day.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: NYC, USA
Posted by waikong on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 2:50 PM

Land this plane now, or I'll give you a bad manicure!

My website: http://waihobbies.wkhc.net

   

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 1:20 PM

Thats because sprue cutters are similar to nail cutters, but without that deadly fold out nail file...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: NYC, USA
Posted by waikong on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 1:02 PM

I agree with you guys there. I recently went on a business trip via air and wondered could I do some modeling in the hotel.  Took a small kit, a spruce cutter, and a tube glue that came free with a kit. Spent a few hours putting sub assemblies together, man, what fun, just like when I has a kid.  BTW, TSA didn't balk with the spruecutter in my toiletry bag. :)

My website: http://waihobbies.wkhc.net

   

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 11:57 AM

BlackSheep makes a really good point. There's always been a problem getting started in model building. The newcomer either goes into the hobby blind, or gets confronted by books, magazines, forums, etc. that are overwhelming in their sophistication.

It's a particular sore point in ship modeling. There are few good, reliable books on that subject that are aimed at beginners and written by people who know what they're talking about. The knowledgeable modelers tend to write sophisticated books (and articles, and forum posts) that demonstrate their own skills and knowledge, which were acquired through years of experience. The "beginner books" tend to be written by people who never got much beyond beginner status themselves. (I'll refrain from mentioning examples.)

The situation for aircraft, armor, car, and railroad modelers is much better. FSM (the magazine) is one of the best places I know of for beginners to get good, knowledgeable advice that will have practical use. And Kalmbach publishes several good books that are aimed at newcomers.

It's a great hobby. Those of us who enjoy it need to be encouraging newcomers - not scaring them off.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    January 2014
  • From: Nampa, Idaho
Posted by jelliott523 on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 11:53 AM

I totally agree BlackSheep, I have started my son on his very first kit recently.  No fancy tools, other than letting him borrow my sprue cutters.  I got him his own Testors Acrylics in the little plastic paint pots and some non-toxic glue.  He asked me if I would teach him how to use my airbrush.  I told him that I would teach him eventually; however, I first want him to learn to follow the directions step-by-step and paint using only the brush and using the traditional glue.  I will help him if and when he asks, but I have explained to him that I want him to learn how to complete a model the way I learned.  He is excited and has been looking at other kits now on what he wants to do when he finishes his current build.

On the Bench:  Lots of unfinished projects!  Smile

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 11:44 AM

I agree. What kind of message is the hobby sending to new hobbists telling them they need 100 different types of tools? When I first started this hobby, I didn't know better  (snap parts off sprues by hand, paint car bodies by hand, not letting glue dry for a bit, etc...). Then my grandfather knew a couple tricks or two by giving me a pair of cutters, small hobby knife, spray paint, and an endless supply of turpentine to clean brushes after painting. (This is going back to the 70s mind you).

For a beginner, I say follow the KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) method until he/she gains some confidence to tackle the next phase in improving themselves. No need to overwhelm them with 100 "must-have" tools at first. Start with a pair of sprue cutters, glue, paint bottle/rattle can spray paint, a few cheap cosmetic nail files for sanding.

  • Member since
    January 2015
Posted by ApplePotato on Monday, January 5, 2015 6:10 PM

I am 28 and I am planning to return to model building :) now that i have the extra cash and time. When I talked to my girlfriend about it she didn't even know such a thing existed lol. She is now very excited about building them with me during the rainy days when we have to stay home.

Anyways I don't think we have anything to worry about. Doing a quick search there are at least 3 to 4 forums in Chinese dedicated to scale modeling with 10,000 + subscribers. We are seeing less young modelers because scale modeling has kind of turn into an art form with a high entry cost. I grew up in HK i can still remember back then kits were rarely painted and they were cheap. I build them with nothing more than a pair of scissors and cement. Now days if you look at the beginners guide to modeling on google you seem to need 100 different tools and a shelve full of paint. It is a big turn off for kids trying to get in to the hobby.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: NYC, USA
Posted by waikong on Tuesday, December 23, 2014 1:14 PM

When we do such comparisons, I always wonder how the literacy rate affects how we interpret the results. Based on some #'s I've found, only 80% of white Americans and 12% of African-Americans were considered literate , compare that to over 99% literacy rate we now have. The letters you read chosen for books are usually of course, well written and heart felt. At the same time, I've read many from 1780's for example, that were almost impossible to read due to grammar and spelling.  It seems to me spelling wasn't even 'standardized'.  Just some more points to ponder over.

My website: http://waihobbies.wkhc.net

   

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Tuesday, December 23, 2014 1:03 PM

I certainly agree. It's not at all unusual for students in my sophomore/junior-level classes to tell me that they've never taken an essay exam, or written a 10-page paper, before.

My wife, a high school social studies teacher, would cry out that it's not fair to blame the teachers, and I agree with her - up to a point. But the English teachers in her school think teaching grammar or syntax is beneath their dignity. If they don't teach the kids to write, who will?

It's extremely unusual for me to get an undergraduate student who can write at what I'd call eighth-grade level. Some of them meet the definition of functional illiteracy. The grad students face stiff competition to get in; their writing is generally satisfactory, and sometimes downright good.

I think another big factor is that young people don't READ as much as they used to. I learned as much about writing from C.S. Forester, Arthur Conan Doyle, Nicholas Monsarrat, and several dozen other novelists and non-fiction authors as I did from any of my English teachers. When my stepson graduated from high school, in 1997, he swore he'd never read another book as long as he lived. This from a kid who'd been raised by two professional educators, in a house overflowing with books. Seventeen years later, so far as I know, he's kept his vow.

But (I always tell myself) then there's Harry Potter. As far as I'm concerned, J.K. Rowling deserves some sort of medal for convincing millions of kids that reading is cool - and fun. I like to think the writing skills of the next generation of college freshmen will be at least a bit better.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, December 23, 2014 12:26 PM

Yes, I do think it's gotten worse in the past 20 years or so, maybe 25 years, and I think that the ever-growing impact of electronic media contribute to it.  There have also been trends in education (dare I say, in pedagogy?) away from teaching English using the tried-and-true methods of learning rules and vocabulary and then practicing them.  There has been a decline in teaching basic writing--essays and compositions aren't nearly as common as they used to be.  I remember someone on the radio--maybe Dennis Prager--talking about reading letters written by the young soldiers in the Civil War, and many of them were far better than anything written by graduate students today.  Not only in their grammar, but in their style.  Their education gave them exposure to the classics, Roman and Greek authors, and of course, they were all supremely literate in the Bible.  So they could make allusions and references that are lost on the average high school student today.

Television and visual media contribute more than a little to this decline, too.  Understood that there is very good content to be found, but generally, there isn't a lot that challenges the mind, and also, we process visual data far differently than we do auditory data or data we read.  Radio and print are still better, generally, to get most ideas across, that a stream of images accompanying the audio.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2005
  • From: near Nashville, TN
Posted by TarnShip on Tuesday, December 23, 2014 10:09 AM

This is getting to be a very entertaining thread.

I find myself reading and laughing internally at some of the gaffs that have been mentioned. I actually knew a Gunny (not my Uncle, a different one) that constantly spelled "Marine Corpse",,,,,,even after a smartaleck Corporal said "just copy it off of that flag"

I didn't like it at the time, but, when I look back I realize that I was blessed to have "old teachers" for most of my classes after about 8th grade or so. My 9th grade English teacher was literally teaching in her final year before retirement. She took a liking to me, and would give me books outside of the curriculum and just say "we'll talk about this after you read it",,,,,,since I read for recreation, that was a fun way to learn.

The history teacher I had in 10th grade for World History, and American history was constantly made fun of by the students because "he was a P_____", But, that old Pole taught history in America in the seventies after his family escaped Poland when he was a boy and landed in America. He might be one of the big reasons I got so interested in WW II, who knows? (he "brought something" to the subject that just reading me the textbook passages hadn't been doing)

Hmm, I seem to be doing the "rambling Auld Phart" thing again, but, y'all lit the fuze. Hahaha

Rex

almost gone

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: NYC, USA
Posted by waikong on Tuesday, December 23, 2014 8:42 AM

Ah, High School Shakespeare.  For me, I did not like reading Shakespeare at all in HS, had to look up words every other sentence just to understand whats going on. Watching the play was worse, as there were no annotations. So gave up on it after the requirement, but a few years after college decided to give it another try.  Loved it and wind up reading 8-9 of his works.  Wonder how many of us were 'spoiled' in HS for great literature simply because we weren't ready or prepared for it.   Moby ***, however, I still reserve as a bloated piece of work that needed about 40% hacked out. :)

My website: http://waihobbies.wkhc.net

   

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Tuesday, December 23, 2014 7:42 AM

Baron, it sounds like your ninth-grade English teacher was my kind of guy. I'm not sure such tactics would work today.

You're right, of course: "you know" and "like" have been plaguing the language for decades. (With my own ears, about twenty years ago, I heard one of my students say: "and the phone rang and I was like, 'hello?'")

Maybe it's my imagination, but the problem seems to have gotten worse lately - to the point that the typical undergraduate almost literally can't communicate without  a "like" or "you know" every few seconds. I don't think most of them are even conscious that they're doing it.

Young people's writing is worse. When I was an undergraduate (not a particularly good one), the professors routinely deducted one point for every misspelled word or grammatical error in an essay exam - in any subject. If I used the same system I'd literally be flunking almost everybody. When I get an undergraduate who does know the difference between "its" and "it's," or "to" and "too," I sit up and take notice. And when a student reminds me that "this isn't an English class," I just say, "there, their, they're."

I wish I had a dollar for every ROTC cadet who couldn't spell the word "soldier." Or "corps." Or for every underwater archaeology grad students who couldn't conjugate the verb "sink." Or for every military history student who mixed up "cavalry" and "Calvary," or "naval" and "navel," or "guerilla" and "gorilla," or "seaman" and...well, you get the picture.

Ahhh, retirement....I'll miss my students like I miss a departed relative, but I won't miss what they do to the language.

I also, however, have to be careful throwing stones from inside a glass house. When I've re-read my own posts on this Forum I've found some awful howlers.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: State of Mississippi. State motto: Virtute et armis (By valor and arms)
Posted by mississippivol on Monday, December 22, 2014 10:21 PM

"Cry, 'Havoc', and let slip the dogs of war" - Marc Antony from Julius Caesar. It's worth a reading, Blacksheep!

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Monday, December 22, 2014 6:15 PM

Try reading Mein Kampf...  Lol! I am no huge fan of Shakespeare myself, but I can appreciate his work. And some of his writing still carries the same weight of impact and emotion that it did centuries ago...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Monday, December 22, 2014 5:02 PM

Shakespeare... good lord. I hated reading Shakespeare in high school English Lit class.

  • Member since
    March 2005
  • From: near Nashville, TN
Posted by TarnShip on Monday, December 22, 2014 12:07 PM

It was a very sad day for me when I found out that Shakespeare was not only not going to be mandatory for my children in high school, but, that those works weren't even available as an elective, either.

Granted, I have not had many conversations in 16th century English, but, some pretty important "non-fiction documents" were written in it, and one "book that shalt not be named on the internet"

Geeesh, just having read Shakepeare makes reading David Eddings' fiction a whole lot easier.

Rex (hoping that there is at least one other fan of Belgarath and Polgara on here)

almost gone

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Monday, December 22, 2014 11:50 AM

To be fair to today's kids, "like" and "you know" didn't start with them.  My 9th grade English teacher took great pains to break us of those habits, and that was in 1978.  If you said, "you know", in the middle of a sentence, he'd respond with,"No, I don't know.  Why don't you tell us?".  And if you used "like", he'd shoot back, "Is it like (the thing or topic), or is it (the thing or topic itself)?"  He used the same tactic for question inflection.  If your pitch went up at the end of a declaration, he'd ask, "Are you asking me or telling me?"  No one else took the trouble to point out those bad habits, and I have never forgotten him.  Mr. Clark, big fella, who was also an EMT.  He introduced us to Shakespeare, too, which I have also never forgotten.  Ah, those were the days...

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Friday, December 19, 2014 10:26 AM

Amen, Don. The phenomenon is especially common around high schools and universities. One of the reasons I'm looking forward to full retirement is the possibility of going twenty-four hours at a stretch without hearing the expressions "you know" and "and I was like...."

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, December 19, 2014 10:03 AM

I find some people feel that electronic communications do not require using even elementary writing skills.  So forums like this are even worse than for hard copy.  But I agree that hard copy writing is really bad compared to what it used to be.

Even newspapers and magazines these days are full of grammatical and spelling errors.  And it is not just writing.  Spoken English is really bad these days.  I hate the 'redundant subject" that is so common these days.  "The President's plan, it just doesn't make sense."  " This high pressure area, it will slowly move to the northeast."  The sentence, it just isn't correct :-)

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Thursday, December 18, 2014 4:24 PM

In terms of college students (the group with whom I'm best acquainted), I think Waikong's probably right. My students' writing skills were abysmal ten years ago, and still are.

I realize college students aren't a representative cross-section of the population. That's what scares me. The university where I work doesn't have particularly high admissions standards, but the people who make it in are, in terms of high school grades and SAT/ACT scores, above the state and national averages.

As Olde Phogies like me have been saying for a couple of millennia, heaven help the world when the next generation takes over. I'm sure my parents' generation said the same thing about mine.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, December 18, 2014 11:48 AM

Hey!  Gaston is back!  How about that?  I wondered where he was, when his nit-picking reviews disappeared from the forum.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Thursday, December 18, 2014 10:28 AM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

I still have my nook but use it for any free books I can put on it. I even have a few $.99 cents books in there as well. What's nice about ebooks is I can DL free samples to read then decide if I want to buy the actual book itself.

I've got a regular Kindle and a Kindle Fire HD, I use the heck out of the regular Kindle. Several thousands of books on my account. Bought books like the Game of Thrones books 1-5 ($19.99) and thousands of free books and a good handful of books priced 99¢ to $9.99.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: NYC, USA
Posted by waikong on Thursday, December 18, 2014 9:02 AM

yes, book sales are up. The fact that is online, I don't see being significant to the premise that people are reading less. If you want to talk about local book stores vs chains vs online, that's different. But it doesn't matter whether people are buying fastfood burgers from McDonald or Burger King if the premise is whether people are eating more fastf food. That's the same issue with our hobby, LHS by itself does not indicate overall trend of the hobby.  It's like saying since ATM's came out, there are less tellers, so the Banking industry is dying.

As for comprehension and reading skills, I don't see any real movement in the last decade. Here's a link that gives real #'s in that regard:

www.childtrends.org

My website: http://waihobbies.wkhc.net

   

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