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INTERIOR PAINTING OF RACE CARS

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  • Member since
    December 2002
INTERIOR PAINTING OF RACE CARS
Posted by SNOOPY on Monday, November 3, 2003 7:00 AM
I was reading the article in this months FSM about painting from a can. I seem to keep missing the actual process of painting cars. No ever really goes into detail about the interior of the body when painting. Do you paint that first or last or just leave it the color of the plastic? All so, I may have asked this in a previous thread but I will do it again, when painting the outside of the body, how do you paint the roof and hood of the car (if all one solid piece)? I can paint the sides no problem but I an always worried that by painting the roof first overspray from doing the side will give an orange peel affect on the roof and if I paint the roof last, the same thing, a peel affect on the sides. This part of not understanding is what keeps me from painting an old Mr. Goodwrench car #3 Dale Earnhardt Lumina.
  • Member since
    December 2002
Posted by SNOOPY on Monday, November 3, 2003 7:04 AM
Actually, this is for any type of car not just NASCARS, etc. Airplanes and Ships seem to be easier but I cannot swear to that in that most of my stuff does not look all that good. 10-12 years in modeling and I have only painted two things that I like. Well, come think of it, I have only painted 3 or 4 models any way but never to a complete stage. SLACKER!!!!
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Maine,USA
Posted by dubix88 on Monday, November 3, 2003 8:04 AM
I put the hood and all that together and paint it all at once. Start with a primer because it helps it stick to the body. Then do mist coat after mist coat until you get the desired color. The pros of this is that it takes less time to dry, but it takes a lot more coats. Also check out the December 2003 issue of FSM. There is an article about how to get great spray can finishes.

I usually paint the engine casing of the interior of the body but not the part where the actual interior of the car goes because that part is not seen on most models. But i repaeat; MOST MODELS. It all depends on what you are building. Especially if you build a race car since you see the inside. Sorry if this is confusing. It is early in the mornin. Good luck

Randy
THATS MY VOTE "If a woman has to choose between catching a fly ball and saving infant's life, she will choose to save the infant's life without even considering if there is a man on base." -Dave Barry In the words of the great Larry the Cable Guy, "GIT-R-DONE!!!"
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 3, 2003 7:02 PM
I just got back into modeling, and do not have access to old editions of FSM, does anyone know if the articale on spray painting from cans, is posted anywhere online. Would really like to see that. I am about to finish my first car in 45 years!!!! and am worried about the bocy painting.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, November 3, 2003 9:44 PM
welcome gary0 to the forums and back into modeling! i dont know about the article being online or not but snoop around the web site here and you may get lucky.
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: New Zealand
Posted by nicholma on Tuesday, November 4, 2003 1:40 AM
I've painted dozens, hundreds even of cars with a spray can with no trouble at all. In fact the only time I've ever had a problem was with an air brush (but that was using a mix of old paints and not straining it so it clogged the tip).

As dubix88 says several mist coats which I allow to flash off before adding the next. I then follow with a slower and therefore heavier final coat which goes on quite wet. It only takes a few seconds maybe (10-15) to paint both sides, the ends and the top, basically all in one go. This means that no bit is actually dry when the next is being painted so any overspray settling where you're already sprayed gets absorbed straight into it. I leave the body sitting for a week or so (although sometimes less than 24hrs if its automotive paint from a can, but definately not Tamiya) and then polish it with an automotive polish or modelling wax, this removes any light blemishes and will take out light orange peel effect if that is present.

I always paint outside because I don't have a spray booth or an extractor in my model room and "she who must be obeyed" forbids me spraying in the kitchen. I therefore have to be doubly careful that there isn't any wind which may deposit fine dust etc.

Snoopy I would strongly recommend that you get a $2 plastic toy and practice or even a plastic bottle or container. You can add layers of paint without damaging something important. It all takes practice and you need to find your own rhythm and style. Don't be put off, spray cans are easy and give superb finishes as the latest FSM shows.

Practice, practice, practice.
Kia ora, Mark "Time flies like the wind, fruit flies like bananas"
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: New Zealand
Posted by nicholma on Tuesday, November 4, 2003 1:48 AM
Sorry forgot to make mention of the interior. If the interior is the same base colour as the exterior I always paint it at the same time as I'm doing the exterior mist coats, making sure that every nook and canny is covered. Any over spray on the exterior doesn't matter. Most interiors of the cars I model (race/rally) are matt anyway so I don't need to ensure they are pristine.

If the interior is a different colour I will undercoat the exterior and interior together then once dry will mask the exterio and paint the interior the colour required. The once that's dry mask the interio and paint the exterior. Sometimes it can take ages masking for a few minutes painting but it has to be done very carefully because its easy for paint to leak in or around windows/light/grill/etc appatures.

Again get a cheap toy and try it out, find the way that works best for you.

Sorry for going on and on and on and on and ..........
Kia ora, Mark "Time flies like the wind, fruit flies like bananas"
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: polystyreneville
Posted by racingmaniac on Saturday, November 8, 2003 11:51 PM
Back about the time Earnhardt drove the Lumina, most Nascars were the same color inside as outside. In the early to mid 90's most teams went with gloss gray so that oil leaks would be easier to find and the late 90's to the present most have gone with different colors altogether from gray for the interiors. I've put together the Lumina myself, and the interior of the car and the chassis called for gloss red. Just paint the red first and then mask off the interior and paint the outside black and you'll have it.
that which doesn't make us irate or irritated, has probably been thrown against the wall.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, November 9, 2003 10:29 AM
I am not sure why everyone is masking. I paint the exterior body when its not on the chassis, so its the only thing getting paint. I paint the interior/cages before assembly.
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