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Imai Spanish Galleon (couple of pics)

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  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Marysville, WA
Imai Spanish Galleon (couple of pics)
Posted by David_K on Saturday, June 22, 2013 6:04 PM

Hey Everyone-

So I finished up the Imai Pirate Ship/Spanish Galleon that I've been working on...

I kinda lost patience with it toward the end, and I'm not super-impressed with the result, but I figured I'd post a few pics anyway...

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     _~ )_)_~
     )_))_))_)
     _!__!__!_         
     (_D_P_K_)
   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ~~~~~~~~~~~

Current Project:  Imai/ERTL Spanish Galleon #2

Recently Finished: Revell 1/96 Cutty Sark

Next Up:  ???

 

  • Member since
    December 2012
Posted by rwiederrich on Sunday, June 23, 2013 8:13 AM

And how is it that you got impatient?

Wonderful work.

  • Member since
    August 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Sunday, June 23, 2013 9:29 AM

AHA !

That is definitely the ship I have .Good job ! !  If you had soaked the anchor line in strong HOT tea it would've had the aged look you needed .        Tanker-Builder

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Marysville, WA
Posted by David_K on Sunday, June 23, 2013 10:24 AM

Thanks, gentleman!

Rob, my impatience came from a combination of things, but mostly I wish I'd have deviated from the rigging instructions sooner (by the end, I was referencing Petersson's Rigging Period Ship Models, and things made more sense).  But I also have been looking forward to my next project, a race car kit build/tip tutorial for a hobby magazine.  So I've been distracted, and working to get this kit finished.  It looks okay, but I could've done better...my next ship will be better, thanks to all the stuff I've been learning on the way.

Tanker, you should have seen the anchor line BEFORE I soaked it in tea!  HAHA...I could have gotten it darker, though...

        _~
     _~ )_)_~
     )_))_))_)
     _!__!__!_         
     (_D_P_K_)
   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ~~~~~~~~~~~

Current Project:  Imai/ERTL Spanish Galleon #2

Recently Finished: Revell 1/96 Cutty Sark

Next Up:  ???

 

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Sunday, June 23, 2013 11:01 AM

Mighty nice model - and, like almost all the old Imai products, obviously a first-rate kit.

But I can't resist the temptation to pass on a piece of advice (strong advice) that I've offered several times before here in the Forum:  don't use tea to dye thread, cloth, or anything else.  

Tea, like coffee, contains tannic acid, which literally eats fabric.  It also darkens over time - and not much time.  The rate of deterioration seems to be unpredictable (probably connected with the type of tea and how strong the brew was), but it's just about guaranteed to happen eventually.

Some years ago I got hired to restore a nice old model (probably made in the 19the century) of what I concluded was an East Indiaman.  (It was about three feet long.)  The sails were made of either silk or linen (probably handkerchief material), and they'd obviously been dyed with either tea or coffee.  They'd turned an extremely dark, slightly reddish brown, certainly not the color the modeler intended.  When I started to take them off the model for cleaning, the fabric literally crumbled under my fingers.  I called up a friend who at that time was in charge of fabric conservation at Colonial Williamsburg, and asked his advice on what was happening and what I should do about it.  He said what I was looking at was "fabric breaks," caused by the tea/coffee; it had literally eaten through the fabric.  As to what I could do about it, the answer was - nothing.

This probably won't matter much to Dave's anchor cable; it will be relatively easy to replace it in the future.  There's also a good chance that the thread is synthetic; I have no idea whether tannic acid will affect it or not.  But I strongly recommend against the use of tea or coffee for any modeling purpose other than slaking thirst.  Tea and coffee are two of the four things I make it a point never to use in a model.  (The other two:  balsa wood, because I hate it, and lead, because it's one of the most physically unstable materials known to mankind.) 

Bottom line, though:  it's a mighty nice model.  The paint job, in particular, is superb.I hope I don't sound patronizing if I say that Dave's progress through (if I'm counting right) three sailing ship models has been a great pleasure to watch.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    December 2012
Posted by rwiederrich on Sunday, June 23, 2013 11:12 AM

If you want stuff dark in a hurry.....use brown india ink diluted in alcohol......Bam!

  • Member since
    June 2012
Posted by arnie60 on Sunday, June 23, 2013 12:39 PM

I concur with the Kudos. Really fine work here. I particularly like the paint job on the hull. Could you please explain what you did to get that effect?

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Marysville, WA
Posted by David_K on Sunday, June 23, 2013 12:44 PM

I like the idea of using diluted brown ink...seems like it would work quickly, and the level of tint would be easily adjustable...not to mention it's probably less likely to deteriorate the materials...thanks for the tip!

And thanks for the kudos, John!  It's funny how, as I learn new techniques, I wish I'd had the skills then when I built previous kits...such is life, you can't have experience until you gain it!

This was my 5th ship kit....My first was a Revell Bonhomme Richard, which was a sloppy build (I didn't join the forum here until I was pretty much done with it), then I built the Revell Vasa...and followed it with the Black Swan (which I consider a great experience, I learned much, and the kit is very high-quality, in terms of manufacture)...then I did the Imai Santa Maria, and finally the Imai Pirate/Galleon Ship.

I agree that Imai makes beautiful parts, and fortunately for me, a lot of what they produced are in the style that I like....I have a number of Imai kits in the stash, and I'm looking forward to building each one!

Dave

        _~
     _~ )_)_~
     )_))_))_)
     _!__!__!_         
     (_D_P_K_)
   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ~~~~~~~~~~~

Current Project:  Imai/ERTL Spanish Galleon #2

Recently Finished: Revell 1/96 Cutty Sark

Next Up:  ???

 

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Marysville, WA
Posted by David_K on Sunday, June 23, 2013 6:58 PM

Arnie, the paint job is a combination of acrylic basecoats, followed with a weathering *blend* using artist oil paints....a big part of the effect is due to the texture and wood grain molding of the plastic.

        _~
     _~ )_)_~
     )_))_))_)
     _!__!__!_         
     (_D_P_K_)
   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ~~~~~~~~~~~

Current Project:  Imai/ERTL Spanish Galleon #2

Recently Finished: Revell 1/96 Cutty Sark

Next Up:  ???

 

  • Member since
    December 2012
Posted by rwiederrich on Sunday, June 23, 2013 11:14 PM

Remember bro,,the alcohol evaporates fast...leaving a nice stain....easily corrected for lighter or darker.

Rob

  • Member since
    June 2012
Posted by arnie60 on Monday, June 24, 2013 12:37 AM

I am only a lowly initiate in this type of magic ( learning to master washes at this point) , but would you be willing to share your recipe with me. I would be most grateful.

  • Member since
    March 2006
Posted by TD4438 on Monday, June 24, 2013 12:38 AM

That is awesome! All the detail just pops.I had this kit as a kid but never finished it.This was an absolute pleasure to view.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, June 24, 2013 9:02 AM

Looks great! Very nice job.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Monday, June 24, 2013 2:37 PM

Did you use orange pekoe or earl grey ?

  He.HE.HE .Neat ! I guess you ran into the same problem I did .It seems that the line in question was NOT true cotton ,but one of the cotton like synthetics .I ran across that on another of IMAII'S model ship kits . The thing is ,you still did a bang up job . So keep on keeping on .      Model On   Tanker-builder

  • Member since
    August 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Monday, June 24, 2013 2:48 PM

Hey :

  Proffessor , I was trying my best to use that tea in the cup that had gone cold He.He.He.  Now , you've solved a mystery for me . I may have had a good education , but chemistry wasn't my strong suit when it came to fabrics . I too , had to restore a ship about twenty-five years ago and the sails just literally crumbled in my hands .When I asked the owner of the model he said his dad had the model restored in 1959 and  I wouldn't be doing it except the trip it took mast first to the floor from twelve feet up on a wall . I at least now know why the fabric crumbled .And it was a reddish color !

  I always appreciate your input on things .Thank You !     Model On - - - - Tanker-Builder.

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, June 24, 2013 3:05 PM

Excellent craftmanship. Very fun to look it (and admire).

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Marysville, WA
Posted by David_K on Monday, June 24, 2013 6:06 PM

Thanks everyone for the nice words!

Tanker, it was Gingerbread Tea...so now my ship smells like Christmas!  lol

Arnie, I consider myself an initiate, as well...only been building ship models for about 1 1/2 years....I get the feeling some of these guys have been doing it for tens of years, and they are the ones with all the real good advice!

There's no real secret recipe, but I can offer you the same advice someone gave me:

Get yourself a *guinea pig* (an unfinished kit you don't care about) and go to the art store and pick up some artist oil paint in the tubes. pick a couple of colors that look like you would want your ship to look like...I like Burnt Umber and other woody colors...also get a stiff oil paint brush and some odorless mineral spirits...

Paint a base coat on your plastic guinea pig hull, deck, etc. (use acrylic paints, because I'm pretty sure the oil paint later will mess up enamels)...once your basecoat is dry...start with the experimentation!  Slap on some oil paint!!  Smear it around!  Blend it in!  See where it takes you!  That's what I did, and though I haven't mastered the technique, I've learned a bit about how to get the effect I like...

I know it seems like some arcane witchcraft, but I promise if you dive into it, you'll begin to see how it works...

        _~
     _~ )_)_~
     )_))_))_)
     _!__!__!_         
     (_D_P_K_)
   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ~~~~~~~~~~~

Current Project:  Imai/ERTL Spanish Galleon #2

Recently Finished: Revell 1/96 Cutty Sark

Next Up:  ???

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, June 24, 2013 10:51 PM

David that is the best yet. I won't patronize you either but I wish you were my son. Very well done, indeed.

My one comment is that those preformed deadeyes are always a challenge. Why?

Simply because the kit manufacturer doesn't provide channels that are broad enough to set up the one thing that really matters. And that would be that the deadeyes, their lanyards and the stays they tension all have to line up. In tension as loose items.

Your ratline skills are great.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    March 2009
  • From: brisbane australia
Posted by surfsup on Tuesday, June 25, 2013 4:25 AM

Really like what you have done with her. Very very nice indeed.....Cheers mark

If i was your wife, i'd poison your tea! If Iwas your husband, I would drink it! WINSTON CHURCHILL

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Marysville, WA
Posted by David_K on Tuesday, June 25, 2013 5:40 PM

GMorrison...Your son?!?   haha I don't know how old you are, but I'm 38...I guess you could adopt me!

I know what you mean about deadeyes...it feels like a shortcut to just cut the shrouds/ratlines off and use the molded deadeyes...that's one of the next big steps for me, but I'm getting there!  If you saw my Santa Maria build, it actually came with some pseudo-deadeye hearts, and I tied the lanyards up on that one..came out pretty good!

        _~
     _~ )_)_~
     )_))_))_)
     _!__!__!_         
     (_D_P_K_)
   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ~~~~~~~~~~~

Current Project:  Imai/ERTL Spanish Galleon #2

Recently Finished: Revell 1/96 Cutty Sark

Next Up:  ???

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, June 25, 2013 6:26 PM

Old enough to be your father.

Your painting skills amaze.

You should take a look at Kidwell and Skinners WW1 GB.

There are some awesome wood effects that bugs in teeth crowd do. You would fit right in.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    August 2014
Posted by Mike1215 on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 7:09 PM

I have the same model (older version) but the quality of your work is far superior.  What colors did you use for the shading and highlights?

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Marysville, WA
Posted by David_K on Wednesday, August 20, 2014 5:16 PM

Thanks, Mike1215!

for the shading/depth/weathering, I used a combination of thin black oil paint wash, and also some straight oil paints...Burnt Umber, Burnt Sienna, and some Raw Umber.

        _~
     _~ )_)_~
     )_))_))_)
     _!__!__!_         
     (_D_P_K_)
   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    ~~~~~~~~~~~

Current Project:  Imai/ERTL Spanish Galleon #2

Recently Finished: Revell 1/96 Cutty Sark

Next Up:  ???

 

  • Member since
    February 2014
Posted by Mr2bill4 on Thursday, August 21, 2014 10:43 AM
Dave, you do such wonderful work! That is one awesome ship. Even at my age, I hope to have just half your skill. I believe I'm going to have that ship. Looks beautiful without sails, the way I like to do them.

Bill
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