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Would you build Revell's 1/96th Cutty Sark if you had it?

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  • Member since
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  • From: Ohio
Would you build Revell's 1/96th Cutty Sark if you had it?
Posted by mikepowers on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 7:05 AM

That is the question.

I picked it up on Ebay for a really good price ($35.00, sweet).

It is a 1965 issue and is in very good condition and I'm not so sure I should start cutting it up.

What do you think?

Thanks guys

Mike

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 7:23 AM
 mikepowers wrote:

That is the question.

I picked it up on Ebay for a really good price ($35.00, sweet).

It is a 1965 issue and is in very good condition and I'm not so sure I should start cutting it up.

What do you think?

 


Hello: Prof. jtilley will comment on it probably. However, what I have red thus fur on this list is the fact that the Cutty Sark from Revell 1:96 is not bad and one of the better kits if I remember correctly.

<>Btw: It is also often said that older kits have got the far better parts because there is not so much flesh around parts as opposed to newer kit releases of the same ship and from the same company. Moldings go worse when time and years tick by.

If you like the ship why not start building it? What is your experience until now? Have you ever built a plastic sailing ship? I have seen images of plastic sailing ships which have been build by newcommers with awesome results. However, it could be also a good idea if you start out with a simpler sailing ship kit and postpone the large and time consuming Cutty Sark 1:96 until to your second project to come.

Regards,
Kater Felix


  • Member since
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  • From: New York City
Posted by Goshawk on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 7:29 AM

Why not? I certainly would.

I guess you have to ask yourself the question: "Am I a builder or a collector?"

I am a builder. I have a collection of unbuilt kits due to the fact that I find things I want to build faster than I can actually build them. I have NEVER purchased a kit based on the premise that it will appreciate in value. NEVER! If I purchased something years ago that is presently worth more than I paid for it, it is by pure luck, nothing more. And I have NO reservations about cracking the cellophane and cutting parts from the runners, assembling and painting a rare "collectors" kit.

From my perspective, all models were produced to be assembled and are worth nothing until that work is performed.

I say build it, enjoy it and share it with others that would enjoy it as well!

Tory

 

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Ohio
Posted by mikepowers on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 7:40 AM

I would agree with both of you. I just needed some positive feedback.

I am a builder also but sometimes (like now) I run acrosss a great kit that might or should be set aside because I'm not that experienced in ship models and I want to do it justice not chop it up and ruin it.

But, I think I'll wait until I have some more experience with sailing ships of this size.

(Watch it be rereleased and all this waiting will be for nothing) :)

 

Thanks

Mike

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: arizona
Posted by cthulhu77 on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 7:48 AM
You bet !  It is one of the nicest builds out there, and most impressive when completed. Save the box, if you'd like to, but by all means build the kit.
http://www.ewaldbros.com
  • Member since
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  • From: Ohio
Posted by mikepowers on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 8:40 AM

Cool.

I was at "oldmodelkits.com" and they have an original from 1960 for about $175.00.

Mine is 1965. I'm gonna have to find a newer one.

I just don't feel right building something so old.

Great, now I'm a collector too.

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 8:56 AM

I'm glad to have the chance to comment on this one.  I fear my comments on the old Heller Soleil Royal in another thread may have given the impression that I'm just a senile curmudgeon (true) who just doesn't like any plastic sailing ship kits (untrue).

The Revell Cutty Sark is a classic - one of the nicer sailing ship kits ever.  In terms of historical accuracy it certainly beats any of the wood versions of the ship on the market.  That it isn't in the current range of either U.S. Revell/Monogram or Revell Germany is really sad; it's the sort of kit that always ought to be available.  If you've got one from 1965, you're probably lucky.  There are nasty stories about warped parts and lots of flash on newer moldings.  (On the other hand, take a careful look at the decal sheet.  If it's yellowed, or looks like it's about to fall apart, you may have a problem.)

The kit dates from 1959, and in many ways it shows it.  On the other hand, some of its features have never been surpassed.  (Those crew figures are exquisite, and the figurehead, in my humble opinion, is a better-looking specimen of feminine anatomy than the one on the real ship.)  If I were building it I'd certainly make some changes.  I just can't live with those plastic "deadeye-and-lanyard" assemblies, the plastic-coated "shrouds and ratlines" are hopeless, and the plastic belaying pins would have to go.  Maybe the biggest problem is the pair of thwartships joints between the deck components.  Years ago I made quite a bit of progress on a modified version of the kit with a layer of basswood planks laid on top of the plastic deck.  That worked quite well (though the model got set aside in favor of other projects; I don't know what happened to it after I moved out of the family house).  Some of the fittings show their age; the cargo winches in front of the fore and mainmasts, for instance, are pretty blobby, and the paneling on the sides of the deckhouses could be better.  But the basic shapes are right, and the kit certainly has the potential to be the basis for a superb scale model.

If I actually were in the market for a Cutty Sark kit, I'd have a hard time choosing between the old Revell 1/96 one and the 1/125 one from Imai.  (Imai is out of business, but the kit recently got reissued under the Aoshima label.)  In many ways the Imai/Aoshima one is more accurate.  The deck fittings are better detailed - and the maindeck is in one piece, eliminating the joint problem.  On the other hand, the Revell one is basically sound and quite a bit bigger.  The latter point may be a plus or a minus, depending on the modeler's living space (and the attitude of his/her Significant Other).  A point I would think about if I were doing it, though, is that quite a bit of the Cutty Sark's rigging is made of chain.  There's a limit to how small chain can be made; the smallest I've found is about 42 links to the inch.  That's too big for much of the chain rigging on 1/125 scale - and marginal for some of it on 1/96.  I'd be concerned that I'd have to give up on using chain for such things as the topsail sheets and halyards on the smaller kit.

In every discussion of the Cutty Sark in this Forum I recommend one additional acquisition:  the set of plans by George M. Campbell.  He was the naval architect in charge of the ship's restoration, back in the 1950s, and the plans are some of the best I've ever seen.  Those three sheets of paper contain just about every piece of information a modeler could want - from a complete sail and rigging plan to the pattern of the linoleum on the deck of the galley.  They're available for about $15.00 through the ship's website:   http://www.cuttysark.org.uk/index.cfm?fa=contentShop.productDetails&productId=40&startrow=1&directoryId=6

One of the biggest bargains available to the model builder today.

The bottom line:  the Revell kit is a nice one, and has the potential to be turned into a spectacular model. 

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 8:58 AM
 mikepowers wrote:

Cool.

I was at "oldmodelkits.com" and they have an original from 1960 for about $175.00.

Mine is 1965. I'm gonna have to find a newer one.

I just don't feel right building something so old.

Great, now I'm a collector too.



Hello: This is a very interesting site. Thanks for posting it. I had never thought that older kits exist outside of ebay.

However, some kits are listed outrageously high. In your particular case I do not understand why you do not want to build it. If you build a very old kit of a particlar ship of the same manufacturer she will look like if you had build that ship based on a newer released kit of that manufacturer. The outcome will be the same. The market is only virtual here (I mean what is the deal with a probably different kit box of two release dates?).

Regards,
Kater Felix

  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Ohio
Posted by mikepowers on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 9:13 AM

Thanks Jtill.

That is great info.I will make sure to check out those plans and remember this thread when I go to build it.

Kater, I see your point. It's just that, this box and everything in it has been together for over 40 years.

In car talk, thats an antique. :)

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 28, 2006 7:01 AM
 mikepowers wrote:

Thanks Jtill.

That is great info.I will make sure to check out those plans and remember this thread when I go to build it.

Kater, I see your point. It's just that, this box and everything in it has been together for over 40 years.

In car talk, thats an antique. :)


Hello: Thanks again for posting the link. I hadn't thought that there exists a market for such kind of things.

I am not objecting the prices as such (hey I spend more than $100,- every month for cigars) but one should be aware that newer kit boxes include often the same sprues.

A local hobby dealer told me he has a customer who bought from him around 1000 kits over the last few couple of years.

Last year it happend that I won an auction on ebay of the "Persian Gulf Trader" from Lindberg. I got it for $10,-. However, I have been told collectors will likely pay $40,- for the kit.

Regards,
Kater Felix

  • Member since
    February 2006
Posted by Grymm on Thursday, September 28, 2006 9:35 AM

Wow!  I'd kill to get a 60's version of the kit.  The molds are real crisp with very little flash.  That was an awesome deal you got.  But don't just save it....BUILD IT!  A model begs to be built.  It is an impressive kit.  I built a 79 version for my boy Jacob.  He loves it and it is just beautiful.

I intend to build another one full sail for our bonus room.  I'll have to start keeping an eye on Ebay again.

Grymm

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: Stockton,Ca
Posted by Hippy-Ed on Thursday, September 28, 2006 9:59 AM
 jtilley wrote:

In every discussion of the Cutty Sark in this Forum I recommend one additional acquisition:  the set of plans by George M. Campbell.  He was the naval architect in charge of the ship's restoration, back in the 1950s, and the plans are some of the best I've ever seen.  Those three sheets of paper contain just about every piece of information a modeler could want - from a complete sail and rigging plan to the pattern of the linoleum on the deck of the galley.  They're available for about $15.00 through the ship's website:   http://www.cuttysark.org.uk/index.cfm?fa=contentShop.productDetails&productId=40&startrow=1&directoryId=6

One of the biggest bargains available to the model builder today.

The bottom line:  the Revell kit is a nice one, and has the potential to be turned into a spectacular model. 



I did this kit when I was 11 yrs. old & those plans definately would've come in handy!! I didn't have the instructions to the kit so, I found as many books with pics that I could findTongue [:P] It builds up nicely & I may try it again one day. That was a model I was proud ofBig Smile [:D]
If you lose your sense of humor, you've lost everything
  • Member since
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  • From: Ohio
Posted by mikepowers on Thursday, September 28, 2006 12:55 PM

Yeah, everything looks pretty crisp.

Lucky to get it.

 

  • Member since
    February 2006
  • From: portland oregon area
Posted by starduster on Thursday, September 28, 2006 6:18 PM
   You bet, I'll build the cutty sark, I recently won the 1960  issue  on e bay for $32.00, it will sit in the line of other ships that are waiting, there's  a few more large 1/96 scale ships that I'd like to get as well, I plan on starting on a few Pyro ships to get used to the art of rigging in the smaller scale this way when I do tackle the big boys my fingers will allready be used to all the small knots that will come, I plan to order figures from Revell but can't HO figures be used as well from the railroad modeling section in the hobby shop ? section gangs and general workers most likely would fit in pretty well with the rest of the crew figures anyone try this yet ? Karl
photograph what intrests you today.....because tomorrow it may not exist.
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  • From: Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan
Posted by bilbirk on Thursday, September 28, 2006 6:35 PM
It was made to be built, So dive in and enjoy it
  • Member since
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  • From: Stockton,Ca
Posted by Hippy-Ed on Thursday, September 28, 2006 7:27 PM
 bilbirk wrote:
It was made to be built, So dive in and enjoy it


Sign - Ditto [#ditto]
If you lose your sense of humor, you've lost everything
MJH
  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Melbourne, Australia
Posted by MJH on Thursday, September 28, 2006 7:41 PM
jtilley's comments about the relative size of the kit as compared with it's Imai counterpart is the reason I haven't been interested in the Revell version of the Cutty Sark - too big.  The Imai is much more space-friendly for me.

My dilemma is similar to mikepowers however, I picked up a mint Imai kit last year with the full intention of building it (one day), but when it arrived I found it was so pristine in every respect it seemed a shame to do so.  If it was in a tatty box and parts were removed from the sprues I wouldn't hesitate so maybe I should look for another, or else buy the Aoshima.

Michael

!

  • Member since
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  • From: Greenville,Michigan
Posted by millard on Thursday, September 28, 2006 9:13 PM

Yes build it it will make agreat looking model.But like its been said change the deadeyes out not only are they ugly they are out of scale.Also you are going to have to do something with the deck.Revells three piece deck system is hard to hide the seams.Two ways either erace alot of detail sanding out the seams or lay in a wood deck.The belaying pins need to be changed to wood or metal.I would change the blocks to wood also.

Rod

  • Member since
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  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Friday, September 29, 2006 11:38 AM

Sounds like a good deal either way.

Built or kept--a good deal is a good deal.

Makes me wish I had not flogged the GooB bought cheap pair of  late-issue CS & Thermopolye that I had meant to 'correct' by kit-bashing a four-masted jackazz barque out of the two.  That project languished no small amount (taking a saw to the hulls still a big step even with only $15 in the two of them).  Abetting languishment was collecting the conversion "bits"--you get enough belaying pins, mast hoops, blocks, eyes, etc., and it's almost easier to build a hull from scratch as jsut use 7-8 parts out of the kits.  (was going to be cool, though, "bridges" & compass platforms were neatly going to "cure" those stinking deck seams <g> . . . )

  • Member since
    June 2006
Posted by Paul5910 on Friday, September 29, 2006 8:26 PM
Gentlemen,

About how long is the 1/96 Cutty Sark?  I keep seeing people saying it's a large model.

Paul
  • Member since
    January 2006
Posted by EPinniger on Saturday, September 30, 2006 8:29 AM
The 1/96 Cutty Sark is about 3 feet long, the hull (without bowsprit) is about 2 and a half feet long.

I've got the same "build or sell" problem myself, as I recently bought an old Aurora "Corsair" kit (US War of Independence privateer) at a collectors fair for a low price. It's definitely worth significantly more than I paid for it (both the box and the kit are in very good condition, and it's an original 1960s issue), on the other hand it's the only plastic kit of a ship like this, and has never been reissued.
If it were an Aurora Hartford, for example, or a Lindberg 1/125 minesweeper, I'd build it whatever it was worth, but as sailing ships are a "secondary" modelling interest of mine, I'm not sure. The kit isn't too bad in terms of detail/quality (a lot better than the Black Falcon or Viking ship, for example) and looks to be about 1/150 scale.
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  • From: On the way to AC+793888
Posted by lolok on Saturday, September 30, 2006 11:49 AM

Re.the Cutty Sark. Last week the trust was given a huge chunk of cash from the National lottery fund to do a complete and extensive refit.basically she will be raised in her dry dock to allow visitors access to her hull bottom and interior/exterior work will be done to bring it back to what she looked like when a working ship..She was in grave danger of falling apart in the dock but much shouting by concerned parties who include the Duke of Edinburgh and Prince Charles have woken the powers that be...The huge refit of Victory helped their cause as well.

 

Jim Ryan Ex-Pat Limey in warsaw.Poland. " MENE,MENE,TEKEL U PHARSIN"
  • Member since
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  • From: Lacombe, LA.
Posted by Big Jake on Sunday, October 1, 2006 9:39 AM

Mike,

One of the first questions that you need to ask yourself is "What period of her history will I model"? On my Cutty Sark I choose the early years (1869-1870), because the model as molded is very close to the original designers plans.

You could choose the latter years when she was sold the the portugese (sp) and was renamed the Ferrier.  You just need to modify the mizen mast into a different rig.

When she was the Cutty Sark she wore a nice little item at the top of her mainmast to set her apart from the rest of the crowd.  Don't forget to add a small Cutty Sark to the mainmast top.  I added one on my model and it gets a lot of questions.

If you are going the extra mile to model it will don't forget to add the jackstays and foot ropes.  They add greatly to the detail and are simply to add. If you care check out my pictures and don't forget to HAVE A BALL BUILDING THE MODEL, Remember it's not a chore, just a hobby past time.

http://community.webshots.com/user/jbgroby

Jake

 

 

  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Ohio
Posted by mikepowers on Sunday, October 1, 2006 9:48 PM

Thanks Jake and everyone.

Thanks to the information that I have recieved from you guys, I'm going build it.

What would I do without the Finescale forums?

Jake, I'm going to check out your pics and refer to it often, thanks again.

Mike

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Lacombe, LA.
Posted by Big Jake on Monday, October 2, 2006 7:02 AM

Mike,

Did you understand about adding the Cutty Sark to the top of the mainmast? If not drop me a line.

Jake

 

 

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: Stockton,Ca
Posted by Hippy-Ed on Tuesday, October 3, 2006 12:07 AM
Jake, thanks for the linkBig Smile [:D] That's a great ookin' model ya didApprove [^]
If you lose your sense of humor, you've lost everything
  • Member since
    June 2006
Posted by Paul5910 on Tuesday, October 3, 2006 12:22 AM
Jake,  I enjoyed seeing the pictures of your Sark build up as well.. Nice work!

Paul
  • Member since
    March 2004
  • From: Belgium
Posted by DanCooper on Tuesday, October 3, 2006 4:52 AM
There is no dilemma, kits are made for building, not to collect dust Smile [:)], if you feel bad about starting to buid it, I'de gladly give you my snail mail address Big Smile [:D]

On the bench : Revell's 1/125 RV Calypso

  • Member since
    January 2005
  • From: Ohio
Posted by mikepowers on Tuesday, October 3, 2006 11:11 AM

Yeah, I feel better about building it now.

It was the thought of not being able to do the kit justice considering I have never built a ship before and the age of the kit and all that.

Were good to go.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: New York City
Posted by Goshawk on Friday, October 6, 2006 10:23 AM
 jtilley wrote:

In every discussion of the Cutty Sark in this Forum I recommend one additional acquisition:  the set of plans by George M. Campbell.  He was the naval architect in charge of the ship's restoration, back in the 1950s, and the plans are some of the best I've ever seen.  Those three sheets of paper contain just about every piece of information a modeler could want - from a complete sail and rigging plan to the pattern of the linoleum on the deck of the galley.  They're available for about $15.00 through the ship's website:   http://www.cuttysark.org.uk/index.cfm?fa=contentShop.productDetails&productId=40&startrow=1&directoryId=6

One of the biggest bargains available to the model builder today.

John,

On your advice I ordered these plans which arrived yesterday.

Let me tell you, these are the nicest plans I have ever seen for any subject, ship, plane or whatever! And at $15.00 they are a steal! I look forward to the day I start my Revell Cutty Sark armed with this information.

Thanks for the tip!

Tory

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