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Post shading with Pencils and Pastels

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  • Member since
    December 2017
Post shading with Pencils and Pastels
Posted by drumsfield on Monday, February 26, 2018 1:23 PM

Any good articles on this subject? I find that I'm a little too clumsy with the airbrush to do any fine detail work aside from base coating and laying down the primary colors. I recently started to use a 4B .5 mechanical pencil to do some post paint panel lines and shading and I'm liking the results so far. I'd like to learn more on the techniques others use. 

  • Member since
    June 2017
Posted by UnwaryPaladin on Monday, February 26, 2018 1:35 PM

The pastel chalks (NOT oil pastels) are great for adding subtle color. The work best on a matte finish, they should be the last step in your finish work. Top coating will change their color, so don't top coat them. They are surprisingly durable, the pigment works it's way down into the matte finish and will not smudge when the model is handled. 

They work great for exhaust, fading panels, etc. I scrape some pigment from the stick with a razor onto a pallete. You can mix the colors to get the shade you want. Apply them with a brush or Qtip, then blend with a paper blending stick or a small piece of toilet paper. 

  • Member since
    December 2013
  • From: Orlando Florida
Posted by route62 on Monday, February 26, 2018 1:37 PM

You may find oil paints to be a better option.  Here is a great video on it.  I have done this technique on several builds with great results:

  • Member since
    December 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Monday, February 26, 2018 2:02 PM

UnwaryPaladin

The pastel chalks (NOT oil pastels) are great for adding subtle color. The work best on a matte finish, they should be the last step in your finish work. Top coating will change their color, so don't top coat them. They are surprisingly durable, the pigment works it's way down into the matte finish and will not smudge when the model is handled. 

They work great for exhaust, fading panels, etc. I scrape some pigment from the stick with a razor onto a pallete. You can mix the colors to get the shade you want. Apply them with a brush or Qtip, then blend with a paper blending stick or a small piece of toilet paper. 

 

Thanks for the tips. I did notice better results with matte finish on my last project. My plan was to do exactly what you stated above. This confirms my thoughts.

  • Member since
    December 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Monday, February 26, 2018 2:03 PM

route62

You may find oil paints to be a better option.  Here is a great video on it.  I have done this technique on several builds with great results:

 

I have a few oils as well. My plan was to use both techniques situationally. As for post shading I haven't seen anything using oils. 

 

Edit: the video is great. I'll have to study the techique more and try it out.

  • Member since
    January 2014
Posted by Silver on Monday, February 26, 2018 2:49 PM

Pastels are the best.post shade is third Place.

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