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Pastel Chalk TEchnique..

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Pastel Chalk TEchnique..
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 9, 2003 2:15 AM
Hi..i need some help on pastel chalk weathering technique.

I saw somewhere on the web -- after the chalk is grinded down; i need to mix it with a bit of water and diswashing soap, then apply it on the model.

On the other hand, some websites preferred using the grinded-chalk straight onto the model by using an old brush. I tried this method, but after the finechalk was applied, i blew air onto the model, and all the chalk particles are gone !!

Which methods should i use ?
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: United Kingdom / Belgium
Posted by djmodels1999 on Sunday, February 9, 2003 9:29 AM
The dry method works fine for me. Sure enough, blowing on the model after application results in a big cloud of dust flying away from the model, but there's always enough left in the recesses the to give the effect I want. In fact, I would think it is a good idea to blow away the excess powder..? Never seen anthing about the wet method..?!
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 9, 2003 1:58 PM
I've heard about making a 'wash' with pastel powders, but have never done it. I think that is what you are refering to.

I use the 'dry' method. Normally here's a few things I've found:
- the paint usually has to be 'flat'. The powder won't stick very well to gloss or a gloss clear-coat.
- I've had trouble getting the powder to 'stick' as much as I wanted and found that sometimes you have to rub it in a bit with your finger.
-you'll always have extra to 'blow' away, but that's the idea. Assess what it looks like after the loose stuff is gone, and then reapply until il looks like you want.
- A clear coat will diminish the effect of the pastels a bit.

M.
  • Member since
    January 2003
Posted by shermanfreak on Sunday, February 9, 2003 1:58 PM
I agree with DJ....apply it dry and scrub it into every nook and cranny you want. Then blow away any excess powder.

H.M. & G.B.
Shermanfreak
Happy Modelling and God Bless Robert
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by jcarlberg on Sunday, February 9, 2003 4:43 PM
THere is an article in FSM in which the author uses a wash of water and white chalk powder to make a worn whitewash camouflage effect, and it looks good.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by weebles on Sunday, February 9, 2003 4:52 PM
The only thing I'll add is that this should be the last thing you do and after you have applied your finish clear coat. I don't think covering the chalk with clear coat looks as good.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 9, 2003 7:20 PM
oh also, if i am to use the "dry method"; what kind of brush should i use ?

I used a "stiff hair" brush and the result was quite funny. The whole model was like being "coloured" by the chalk powder (sorry i dont know how to put this into words). Should i opt of softer brush instead ?
I know my question may sound a little silly; but ive never done this before. Sadly, none of my friends is into this hobby :(

Your help is greatly appreciated.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by weebles on Sunday, February 9, 2003 9:17 PM
I use a very stiff brush myself. You need something that lets you work the chalk into the finish. I also make use of cotton balls. After I apply the chalk I buff it down with the cotton.
Dave
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: United Kingdom / Belgium
Posted by djmodels1999 on Monday, February 10, 2003 1:49 AM
I instead use wery soft wide brushes, those with the 'fan' shaped brush. They take a lot of powder and their long bristles and softness allows for a decent amount of 'drybrushing' and shoving, even on the most fragile details.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, February 10, 2003 5:37 AM
rightt......thank you !!
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Steinwedel, Lower Saxony,Germany
Posted by tango35 on Saturday, February 15, 2003 3:18 PM
I prefer the wet variant in pllying the pastel chalks with a broad brush - like used by kids, so i can reach every edge and the access can be removed very easily.
but like always 100 waays to Rome. So, Seagull try and test and in the end you will find your personal way, ok.
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by James Mark on Sunday, February 16, 2003 12:36 AM
I mix ground pastel chalk with windex and use it as a wash....works great to grime up engines (trains, planes and automobiles) Careful with windex though because it can damage your paint. (It eats future) I usually only do it on engines. I give a quick grimy wash and don't mess around to much or the underlying paint comes apart. If you lay a quick wash down and leave it, it looks great and doesn't blow off!

James
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, February 17, 2003 4:06 PM
For applications, try the soft eye shadow brushes the ladies used to put on eye make up. Use them to rub the pastel chalk into the paint (flat finish). It goes kind of slow, but that's what you want to achieve the desired results.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, March 2, 2003 1:36 PM
I only use the wet method (slightly damp brush in water into the ground up powder) when I'm trying to simulate rust or grease streaks.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada
Posted by tknight on Friday, March 7, 2003 9:35 AM
The method I have used along with brushes is an artist's blending stump. It is like a blunt pencil, but is made of tightly wrapped paper. It can be sharpened to a relative point in a pencil sharpener. This action also cleans it. You have a lot of control when applying chalk in areas such as exhaust stains on 1/72 aircraft. The material is firm, but soft enough that it does not marr the paint. As stated earlier, flat finishes are best to apply chalk on.
Wink [;)]
Regards, Tim
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