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Interesting Discussion. What is Squadron Green or P.P.G. Spot or Glazing Putty?

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  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Interesting Discussion. What is Squadron Green or P.P.G. Spot or Glazing Putty?
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 7:16 AM

Hi Ya'll;

       Here's one that begs to be brought forward once again, From a former Car Body and Auto restoration Shop. First and Foremost. Years ago when I had the place it was NOT called a " Body Shop" it was called a "Body Restoration Facility" I thought it was a neater name being as that's how it started.

        I began the business because I liked seeing how well I could restore both Wrecks and old Cars in General. There was a product available even then called Glazing Putty. It was manufactured by the various Paint Companies under their Label. The most well known were P.P.G.Red Glazing Putty. and the other, who's name escapes me was also offered in Green as and still is, as Whoever it is, still making some Squadron Products(Squadron Green Putty).

        It was primarily used on the paint where chips and small dents couldn't be removed, or Flat spots were in the paint. You feathered the area then applied the "Glazing Compound, or Putty and when set-up you wet sanded it and blended it into the existing paint then re primed the area and finished out the job.

         It was NOT a filler like Bondo! It actually a thicker type of Primer. This could fill spots thinner than a business card and thus be used on top of and under Primer as well as the regular paint! This is what we use as a filler in models sometimes. It's NOT for deep holes, but a Primer-Filler like Mr. Hobby or others. Now what have many modelers discovered about it?

      It can be applied numerous times in a thin layer around Wing roots, Armor edges and in Model cars when working multiple parts together that aren't supposed to have seams between them. But here's the give-away that it's NOT actually Putty. It can be thinned with straight Lacquer Thinner-Never Nail Polish remover! Not Acrylic Retarders or Thinner even if they say Lacquer based. It's a different type of lacquer.

       Now that said, have fun with it and remember, it can be smoothed on the final coats with a wet Finger. Make sure the joint or spot you used it on is not under a lot of stress from weight. It has no tensile strength and will just crack!The shear strength of the stuff is Zero. Regular Hobby Putty is like Bondo, and that's for the most part fairly stable is most cases.    Bye!

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 8:32 AM

Why use putty when medium-viscosity CA and Apoxie Clay work so much better?  Don't have to worry about either one of those things cracking.  Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 11:25 AM

A long time ago (20+ years) I was talking to Chuck Hranski the VP of Squadron in the Jerry Campbell/Squadron 1.0 timeframe.   I asked him about the Squadron putties.  He said that the Green stuff was an automotive solvent-based body filler, repackaged to Squadron's specs.  Wild custom auto modelers were using the real auto stuff and Squadron saw a market opening.   Hey, there is a model hobby's logo on it, it must be better.  The other modeling putties at the time were a cellulose based product and were very coarse and difficult to feather.   Super glues had not reached the hobby yet, nor had epoxies 

When asked about Squadron White, he said it was Green without the dye.  One of the knocks on Squadron Green was the color difference between the putty and the plastic.  An extra coat or two of primer was needed to even the colors before painting could begin.  White mitigated the difference.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 12:04 PM

There is a Bondo labeled Glazing compound thats easy to find, costs a reasonable amount for a lot of it, and is easy to work with.

I don't have any luck with CA, just me. It's either too hard or too soft when I work with is. And it can't be used during assemby if clear parts are already installed near by.

I also have good results filling gaps with sprue goo.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 12:38 PM

Hi " G " :

        I too am using it more, with fantastic results. I have two bottles I will call "Dove Grey". These I remake as needed. I have the formula written on one of the Bottles with a prescription type label that I clear coated so it wouldn't fade. Then I have one in Maroon, One in White and one in Black. The " Dove Grey" is for general Purpose.The Maroon is for the three Cadillac kits ( Revell) Re-pops in that color. White for AMT-MPC-Atlantis-Re-Pops, Black fro RailRoad Stiff(Most of the base plastic on these seems to be Black!

        I even did some in Clear. Wrote about it some time back Made a mold of Clay and held together by LEGOS. Fact is I bled carefully the Clear into the mold and rotated it slowly till it started to harden. Wound up with "Gasp!" an optically Clear dupe of the original. Second try not so well. But It can be done. I have made Auto cycle type fenders this way.I like the possibilities different Sprue Gloo gives. Can't do that with regular fillers. Have even rebuilt some damaged panel edges and windshield trim on Glue Bombs I rebuilt. You can't do that with Glazing Putties of any kind or the Regular fillers.

       All have their place really. All these years I remember what Squadron White reminds me of. Tamiya Filler that's available today, Same consistancy too!

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 2:58 PM

GMorrison
I don't have any luck with CA, just me. It's either too hard or too soft when I work with is. And it can't be used during assemby if clear parts are already installed near by.

I just use the Gorilla CA with the light blue cap and let it cure a few hours on its own before sanding it.  I'm able to wet sand it smooth with 1500 and 1800 micromesh sticks.  I hear ya though, lots of other CAs out there, and the results are all over the place.  I've seen so many people fill it with things like baking soda and never had much luck doing that myself.  It always ended up a rock-hard, jagged mess that would shred your sand paper.  Give Apoxie Clay a try some time with the more delicate jobs near clear parts.  You can shape and smooth that with a damp q-tip before it cures.  No sanding required, and it has the strength of epoxy...also no solvents to damage polycarbonate.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    January 2020
Posted by Space Ranger on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 4:58 PM

EdGrune

A long time ago (20+ years) I was talking to Chuck Hranski the VP of Squadron in the Jerry Campbell/Squadron 1.0 timeframe.   I asked him about the Squadron putties.  He said that the Green stuff was an automotive solvent-based body filler, repackaged to Squadron's specs.  Wild custom auto modelers were using the real auto stuff and Squadron saw a market opening.   Hey, there is a model hobby's logo on it, it must be better.  The other modeling putties at the time were a cellulose based product and were very coarse and difficult to feather.   Super glues had not reached the hobby yet, nor had epoxies 

When asked about Squadron White, he said it was Green without the dye.  One of the knocks on Squadron Green was the color difference between the putty and the plastic.  An extra coat or two of primer was needed to even the colors before painting could begin.  White mitigated the difference. 

I think Squadron's putties were repackaged 3M putties. I had a 1-lb tube of 3M's Acryl Green Glazing Putty, and it was identical in every way to Squadron's. 3M's putties were also available in red, white, and blue; the green, red, and white varieties are still available.

https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/p/d/b40067518/

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Tuesday, May 24, 2022 9:07 AM

Eaglecash867

Why use putty when medium-viscosity CA and Apoxie Clay work so much better?  Don't have to worry about either one of those things cracking.  Cool

 

I'm with TB on  this one.  Yes, auto body fillers are just extra thick primers, but I have tried many other fillers and still stay with glazing putty.  I like the consistancy and set up time better than anything else.  I can control the consistancy with drops of lacquer thinner while working it

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Tuesday, May 24, 2022 10:38 AM

missileman2000
I'm with TB on  this one.  Yes, auto body fillers are just extra thick primers, but I have tried many other fillers and still stay with glazing putty.  I like the consistancy and set up time better than anything else.  I can control the consistancy with drops of lacquer thinner while working it

Not much that has to be controlled or messed with consistency-wise with my methods.  The CA can be applied right over the top of primer if you discover you missed a tiny gap...doesn't turn into a gooey mess like it would with anything with lacquer thinner in it...it mixes with the primer and cures to grey CA that easily sands smooth just like the plastic around it.  Also doesn't absorb primer and paint after its cured.  Great for erasing re-scribing slip ups too without damaging the surrounding details.  Working with Apoxie Clay is as simple as using water to shape and smooth it.  You don't have to even come back and sand it afterward and it won't crack when subjected to flexing or impact.  I also prefer to stay away from chemical compounds that can damage the plastic, and never was a fan of the whole putty, sand, repeat debacle that leaves dust and residue all over everything.  No reason for me to go backward when there are better materials available.  To each his own.  2 cents

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, May 25, 2022 12:54 PM

Hi.

      Just have to note here. You can use a dampemed finger to smooth Glazing Putty out in fillets and stuff like that. You cannot do that safely with C.A.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, May 25, 2022 1:16 PM

Tanker-Builder

Hi.

      Just have to note here. You can use a dampemed finger to smooth Glazing Putty out in fillets and stuff like that. You cannot do that safely with C.A.

 

True, but that's what the Apoxie Clay is for.  Wink  Its pretty much like Milliput, but its much easier to work with.  No solvents, no dust, no cracking.  The CA is for filling spots in seams that didn't quite weld correctly with the Tamiya Extra Thin Cement.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

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