SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

brush painting

1001 views
6 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April 2023
  • From: New mexico
brush painting
Posted by John3M on Monday, October 30, 2023 11:57 AM

I've been reading the posts regarding brush painting, but I also wanted to ask specifically about this. When painting parts with great detail but too small for the airbrush, what technique do you use and tell me about thinning the paint. How many coats of paint, assuming it was thinned, do you typically apply? Since I am returning and finding so many great models with super detail, I am trying to learn what others do. Also, In some cases the part seems to small to mask with tappe then I assume you use a liquid mask? can the liquid mask be thinned, it seems clumpy sometimes and too thin in other applications.

Thanks much

Cheers John

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, October 30, 2023 12:30 PM

About the only brush painting I do anymore is small details that are molded into larger parts that I have airbrushed with lacquer paint.  When brush painting, I have been using the old fashioned Testors square bottles, because they brush and cover really well.  The other advantage to using those for brush painting details on a larger part that has been painted with lacquer is that the solvent in the Testors paint is pretty much completey harmless to the lacquer.  So, it doesn't cause the lacquer underneath to start lifting.  Also, any mistakes you make can be removed with a Q-tip dampened with paint thinner, without damaging the lacquer underneath it.  Just one coat of Testors usually does the trick.

Liquid maskers I have found to not be good for much other than filling in areas between where you have applied paper masks to something like an aircraft canopy.  You just can't get a sharp, clean edge using a liquid masker.  I don't like using tape of any kind for masking either, because it is often too thick to lay down properly, and also quite often damages the paint underneath by leaving a residue or slightly altering its sheen.  Any masking I do now is done with Tamiya masking sticker sheets.  They're nice and thin, so they lay down really well, and they don't do any damage to the paint they're applied to.  The other advantage is that the adhesive that's on them is just the right amount of aggressiveness and it stays that way, so they're infinitely repositionable...letting you get your mask in exactly the right spot.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    April 2023
  • From: New mexico
Posted by John3M on Monday, October 30, 2023 12:40 PM

when you use the Tamiya sheets around curved surfaces how do you manage to get the curve correctly masked?

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, October 30, 2023 12:44 PM

I hand brush paint all of my tools and extra fittings on armor and vechicles,I usually slide a post-it note under it or right up against it as a mask.If it's a small piece I never see the need to thin it,just straight from the bottle.

Same thing with molded on deck details on ships.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, October 30, 2023 12:53 PM

John3M

when you use the Tamiya sheets around curved surfaces how do you manage to get the curve correctly masked?

 

Assuming you're talking about keeping a straight line around a curved surface, I use the sheets that are printed with a 1mm grid on them, so to go around a curved surface while still keeping a straight line, I usually just cut a 2mm strip which gives enough flexibility for it to follow the contour of the color separation I want.  Then I use bigger strips to cover enough of the rest of the area I want masked just to make sure overspray doesn't get on it.  Usually doesn't take much.  I have used my Paasche H airbrush for so long, I'm pretty precise with it and don't get much overspray.

For curved patterns, of course, I just cut the masking sheet to the shape I want.  Did the scalloping between the white and grey on this F-4B that way, and the masking around the bare metal areas on the tail were done with several smaller strips as well.

 

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Tuesday, October 31, 2023 9:43 AM

Eaglecash867

About the only brush painting I do anymore is small details that are molded into larger parts that I have airbrushed with lacquer paint.  When brush painting, I have been using the old fashioned Testors square bottles, because they brush and cover really well.  The other advantage to using those for brush painting details on a larger part that has been painted with lacquer is that the solvent in the Testors paint is pretty much completey harmless to the lacquer.  So, it doesn't cause the lacquer underneath to start lifting.  Also, any mistakes you make can be removed with a Q-tip dampened with paint thinner, without damaging the lacquer underneath it.  Just one coat of Testors usually does the trick.

Liquid maskers I have found to not be good for much other than filling in areas between where you have applied paper masks to something like an aircraft canopy.  You just can't get a sharp, clean edge using a liquid masker.  I don't like using tape of any kind for masking either, because it is often too thick to lay down properly, and also quite often damages the paint underneath by leaving a residue or slightly altering its sheen.  Any masking I do now is done with Tamiya masking sticker sheets.  They're nice and thin, so they lay down really well, and they don't do any damage to the paint they're applied to.  The other advantage is that the adhesive that's on them is just the right amount of aggressiveness and it stays that way, so they're infinitely repositionable...letting you get your mask in exactly the right spot.

 

Eaglecash867

About the only brush painting I do anymore is small details that are molded into larger parts that I have airbrushed with lacquer paint.  When brush painting, I have been using the old fashioned Testors square bottles, because they brush and cover really well.  The other advantage to using those for brush painting details on a larger part that has been painted with lacquer is that the solvent in the Testors paint is pretty much completey harmless to the lacquer.  So, it doesn't cause the lacquer underneath to start lifting.  Also, any mistakes you make can be removed with a Q-tip dampened with paint thinner, without damaging the lacquer underneath it.  Just one coat of Testors usually does the trick.

Liquid maskers I have found to not be good for much other than filling in areas between where you have applied paper masks to something like an aircraft canopy.  You just can't get a sharp, clean edge using a liquid masker.  I don't like using tape of any kind for masking either, because it is often too thick to lay down properly, and also quite often damages the paint underneath by leaving a residue or slightly altering its sheen.  Any masking I do now is done with Tamiya masking sticker sheets.  They're nice and thin, so they lay down really well, and they don't do any damage to the paint they're applied to.  The other advantage is that the adhesive that's on them is just the right amount of aggressiveness and it stays that way, so they're infinitely repositionable...letting you get your mask in exactly the right spot.

 

I always use the Testors enamel, either over bare plastic or over lacquer or Krylon rimer.  Have also found liquid mask inadequate.  I mask with tamiya tape, cut with scalpel.

  • Member since
    April 2023
  • From: New mexico
Posted by John3M on Tuesday, October 31, 2023 9:59 AM

missileman2000

 

 
Eaglecash867

About the only brush painting I do anymore is small details that are molded into larger parts that I have airbrushed with lacquer paint.  When brush painting, I have been using the old fashioned Testors square bottles, because they brush and cover really well.  The other advantage to using those for brush painting details on a larger part that has been painted with lacquer is that the solvent in the Testors paint is pretty much completey harmless to the lacquer.  So, it doesn't cause the lacquer underneath to start lifting.  Also, any mistakes you make can be removed with a Q-tip dampened with paint thinner, without damaging the lacquer underneath it.  Just one coat of Testors usually does the trick.

Liquid maskers I have found to not be good for much other than filling in areas between where you have applied paper masks to something like an aircraft canopy.  You just can't get a sharp, clean edge using a liquid masker.  I don't like using tape of any kind for masking either, because it is often too thick to lay down properly, and also quite often damages the paint underneath by leaving a residue or slightly altering its sheen.  Any masking I do now is done with Tamiya masking sticker sheets.  They're nice and thin, so they lay down really well, and they don't do any damage to the paint they're applied to.  The other advantage is that the adhesive that's on them is just the right amount of aggressiveness and it stays that way, so they're infinitely repositionable...letting you get your mask in exactly the right spot.

 

 

 

 
Eaglecash867

About the only brush painting I do anymore is small details that are molded into larger parts that I have airbrushed with lacquer paint.  When brush painting, I have been using the old fashioned Testors square bottles, because they brush and cover really well.  The other advantage to using those for brush painting details on a larger part that has been painted with lacquer is that the solvent in the Testors paint is pretty much completey harmless to the lacquer.  So, it doesn't cause the lacquer underneath to start lifting.  Also, any mistakes you make can be removed with a Q-tip dampened with paint thinner, without damaging the lacquer underneath it.  Just one coat of Testors usually does the trick.

Liquid maskers I have found to not be good for much other than filling in areas between where you have applied paper masks to something like an aircraft canopy.  You just can't get a sharp, clean edge using a liquid masker.  I don't like using tape of any kind for masking either, because it is often too thick to lay down properly, and also quite often damages the paint underneath by leaving a residue or slightly altering its sheen.  Any masking I do now is done with Tamiya masking sticker sheets.  They're nice and thin, so they lay down really well, and they don't do any damage to the paint they're applied to.  The other advantage is that the adhesive that's on them is just the right amount of aggressiveness and it stays that way, so they're infinitely repositionable...letting you get your mask in exactly the right spot.

 

 

I always use the Testors enamel, either over bare plastic or over lacquer or Krylon rimer.  Have also found liquid mask inadequate.  I mask with tamiya tape, cut with scalpel.

 when painting a large area like a submarine I assume you would use an airbrush or rattle can of primer first?

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.