SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Priming a model . .how many coats?

5056 views
13 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April 2023
Priming a model . .how many coats?
Posted by KeithRob on Sunday, November 26, 2023 6:00 PM

I am priming a 1/48 tank today and added a layer of Vaelljo gray primer.  So far only one coat. . . do I need additional coats or will one suffice?    thanks

"Charlie don't surf!"

Lieutenant Colonel William "Bill" Kilgore

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Sunday, November 26, 2023 6:24 PM

You just need enough primer to get complete coverage.  You don't want to go beyond that because you start building too thick a coating and you'll start to soften and lose some of the fine detail on your tank.  Hope that Vallejo primer works out OK for you.  I haven't heard very positive things about it.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    April 2023
Posted by KeithRob on Sunday, November 26, 2023 10:46 PM

thanks . . .it seemed to go on very well. . nice and smooth.  

"Charlie don't surf!"

Lieutenant Colonel William "Bill" Kilgore

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, November 27, 2023 6:06 AM

I have heard that it has problems with adhesion, so just be sure to do a tape test on it before you start painting to make sure its not going to peel away.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, November 27, 2023 7:05 AM

Well sometimes when you prime you see the seams and rough spots that need work,so you sand,putty,polish and repair and then prime again,still looks rough,a little more sanding here and there.

So the answer to your question is as many times as it takes.

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Monday, November 27, 2023 8:51 AM

Tojo72

Well sometimes when you prime you see the seams and rough spots that need work,so you sand,putty,polish and repair and then prime again,still looks rough,a little more sanding here and there.

So the answer to your question is as many times as it takes.

 

 

Another reason I love lacquer.  I can prime over a filled seam to check it or go back and sand/blend without any built up edges.  Spot priming with acrylic generally looks like a scab.  

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, November 27, 2023 8:56 AM

MJY65

 

 
Tojo72

Well sometimes when you prime you see the seams and rough spots that need work,so you sand,putty,polish and repair and then prime again,still looks rough,a little more sanding here and there.

So the answer to your question is as many times as it takes.

 

 

 

 

Another reason I love lacquer.  I can prime over a filled seam to check it or go back and sand/blend without any built up edges.  Spot priming with acrylic generally looks like a scab.  

 

Yes,I use either Tamiya or Mr Surfacer 1200

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Monday, November 27, 2023 9:45 AM

I do like Stynylrez ( poly acrylic) in terms of coverage and adhesion. It sticks as well, IMO and as my own test bear witness to, as Mr Surfacer. That said, I have lately been using more Mr Surfacer or Mr Primer Surfacer, guess I'm just comfortable with that old lacquer experience.That and the fact that my colors lately have been done with Tamiya LP lacquers.

As far as the Vallejo primer goes I stay away for the reasons mentioned, I just don't need to wade into something that may not work well. But I want to add that often times in reviews I've seen that they run their tests far too soon. Vallejo states that their primer is a 24 hour drying product. Now see that's one place where Stynylrez and Mr Surfacer both shine, either is ready to work with within minutes to a couple of hours. But also, Vallejo adhesion and dry times can be improved with heat setting.

How many coats ? Often for me it's just one. If there was repair work or other finishing of the plastic, sand scratches show up or whatever, then who knows how many. As mention, however many are needed. Start at one and see what you get. To me the less the better though. And if your color coat is flat then it's not as important as with high gloss. Again, IMO.

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, November 27, 2023 2:18 PM

MJY65
Another reason I love lacquer.  I can prime over a filled seam to check it or go back and sand/blend without any built up edges.  Spot priming with acrylic generally looks like a scab.  

Yup.  Same reason I like Tamiya's Surface Primer and other lacquer primers...they go on nice and thin and easily blend with the surrounding area.  That's the reason I like to decant my Tamiya Surface Primer rattle cans.  I can easily fix accidental scratches and chips in a finished paintjob just by feathering out the damage, feathering in a little primer, followed by an airbrushed touchup of the paint.  Don't even have to mask anything usually.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    April 2023
Posted by KeithRob on Monday, November 27, 2023 3:31 PM

MANY thanks for all the information. . . Next time I will go wiith Stynylrez .

"Charlie don't surf!"

Lieutenant Colonel William "Bill" Kilgore

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, November 27, 2023 5:06 PM

KeithRob

MANY thanks for all the information. . . Next time I will go wiith Stynylrez .

 

Make sure that you clean that stuff out of your airbrush right away,that stuff can be brutal inside if it drys a little.

  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by MJY65 on Monday, November 27, 2023 6:06 PM

KeithRob

MANY thanks for all the information. . . Next time I will go wiith Stynylrez .

 

 

Yikes! Just make sure it is delivered when the outdoor temperature is between 65 and 72 degrees, mix it 12 times, say the secret incantation, spray it from an airbrush hand made by Tibetan monks and clean it with a mixture of 12 parts water, 1 part IPA, 3.5 parts Windex and one drop of unicorn tears.

OK, maybe a BIT of hyperbole there, but the stuff is not exactly user friendly.

  • Member since
    November 2023
Posted by FalconFan24 on Friday, December 8, 2023 2:32 PM

Kieth,

General rule with how many primer coats....you want enough coats to cover the model and not let the plastic underneath show through. That might be one coat or three.

I also notice people are recommending Badger Primer. I love Badger primer and it is my go to. However, money isn't just laying around these days. So before you buy another item, recommend you check out the following video. It will help you get the best results out of Vallejo primer. The formula within will help you airbrush Vallejo primer better with significantly less tip drying, lays down smooth, and is sand-able after 40 mins instead of waiting 24 hours.

 

https://youtu.be/UdlrnivXAI4?si=zlC_sHREdOBeTfmw

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Monday, December 11, 2023 3:32 PM

Depends on why you are priming.  If for better adhesion, one coat is usually enough.  If it is to fill gaps, scratches and such, then use as many as necessary.  For deep scratches, I kie to use auto body primer, which has a lot of solids in it, and will fill deeper scratches.  If two or three primer coats is not enough, you need to use putty.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.