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Do I really need a panel scibing tool?

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  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Everywhere
Do I really need a panel scibing tool?
Posted by stinger on Monday, December 29, 2003 2:13 PM
Hey Gang - I need to reproduce the raised panel lines on an aircraft. I know that if I'm careful, I can use a #11 exacto blade that creates a tiny "valley", and also gives the raised look. too, but I usually drift away from my straightedge and end up filling the mistake.

Would it be better to use a scibing tool?

Would it look weird to combine recessed lines with the molded-in raised lines? I know that a lot of you pros sand away the raised lines and rescribe them, but I don't have that kind of patience. I just want a reasonable looking model.

Also, for some reason I thought scibers came in different sizes, but I only see one size at MicroMark and Squadron. Would that one size be appropriate for 1/72 scale?

Thanks for any advice.

stinger

May an Angel be your wingman, and the Sun be always at your six

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 29, 2003 4:08 PM
I've little experience using scribing tools but these are more adequate for curved lines, in the other hand, the straight raised lines are easy to make with the x-acto and looks ok, if you are not patient you can combine raised and recessed panel lines.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Monday, December 29, 2003 5:07 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by stinger


Would it be better to use a scibing tool?


I don't think so because a scribing tool removes the plastic and leaves a small channel cut with no raised edge.

QUOTE:
Also, for some reason I thought scibers came in different sizes, but I only see one size at MicroMark and Squadron. Would that one size be appropriate for 1/72 scale?


They don't have different sizes. What you do is just run the scriber lightly down the line you want with one or two passes for 1/72 scale and with 1/48 scale you scribe a little more to get the scale effect you want.
I am by no means an expert on this subject so I will let the veterans of scribing answer you more thoroughly. Wink [;)]

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 29, 2003 5:46 PM
I would say it depends on you and how good you are with your tools.

Each tool needs to be mastered for each technique you want.
Too many people fall into the trap of buying a tool because it is recommendet or supposed to be better than another tool.

Remember the tool is only as good as the person wielding it, no guarantees that any tool will produce better results.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 29, 2003 6:51 PM
I bought the one from Micromark and, although it works great, The ones my dentist gave me work just as nice. Ask your dentist for a few old ones. Free is the magic word. Or is it please?Smile [:)]
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 6:39 AM
Yes actually you do...lol
It can help you recreate missing panels and enhance fade ones.
If you worked on limited run models you will know what I mean.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Tochigi, Japan
Posted by J-Hulk on Tuesday, December 30, 2003 9:05 AM
I don't know if I'd recommend trying to recreate raised panel lines by scribing in any case...you might get a raised edge, but you're gonna get a cut, too. I've never tried that technique, nor have I ever seen it done, but I don't have a lot of faith in it.

If you want raised lines, how about using stretched sprue? Stretch out a bit to the thickness you need, and glue it where you need it. This is a technique that I have used, and it's great for filling in short distances of raised lines that may have been destroyed by filling and sanding seams.

As far as scribing "engraved" panel lines goes, you can get just as good a result from a sewing needle in a pin vise as you can with an expensive scribing tool.
~Brian
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Central USA
Posted by qmiester on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 7:17 PM
I agree with J-Hulk, you can do a very good job with a large kneedle in a pin vise. Especially on 1/72 scale models. But the big secret (?) is to practice a while before you do it for real.
Quincy
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