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What type of paint brush do you recommend?

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  • Member since
    March 2004
  • From: Placerville, CA USA
What type of paint brush do you recommend?
Posted by Mark Joyce on Saturday, April 3, 2004 9:09 AM
Hi everyone,

This is my first post on Finescale Modeler, though I've been checking it out for awhile. Lots of great information!

Anyway, I'm in the process of replacing several of my older brushes. What type of brush do you recommend? I'm talking the type of bristle, not so much the size (although recommendations on that too would help!). I've tried searching the forum to see if this question has been asked before, but couldn't find any answers (probably more due to a lack of search ability on my part).

By the way, I use enamels, usually Model Master (mainly due to availability), in case that makes a difference in the type of brush.

Thanks in advance for the help!Smile [:)]

Mark
Ignorance is bliss
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: A Spartan in the Wolverine State
Posted by rjkplasticmod on Saturday, April 3, 2004 9:40 AM
Welcome to the Forum Mark. You'll get better answers if you get a bit more specific with questions. What are you going to use the brushes for? Assuming you want to paint figures, the Winsor & Newton red sable rounds are the best in my opinion, but a little expensive. For general modeling use such as adding washes, dry brushing, painting small details on AC or Armor, you can get by with less expensive brushes. Floquil makes a nice line of moderate priced brushes. Size of brush really depends on the task, but a range of 00 to #3 covers most applications.
RICK At My Age, I've Seen It All, Done It All, But I Don't Remember It All...
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Central USA
Posted by qmiester on Saturday, April 3, 2004 10:18 AM
Welcome to the forum

Rick's right. You'll find that some good quality paint brushes will make a big difference. And you need to take care of them (You aren't going to be spending 2.98 for a 1/2 dozen of them). When you finish painting, you need to not only to wash them out with thinner, but to wash them with soap and warm water and suspend or stand them to dry. If you have access to an artist's supply store (or a Hobby Lobby), you should be able to get brush soap. (I use Grumbacher' Brush Soap). One jar will last years and extend the life of your brushes correspondingly.

BTW - If you can't find Windsor & Newtons, Grumbacher brushes are almost as good.
Quincy
  • Member since
    March 2004
  • From: Placerville, CA USA
Posted by Mark Joyce on Saturday, April 3, 2004 10:28 AM
Sorry about not being specific enough.Sign - Oops [#oops]

The brushes will be for general painting of aircraft, mainly WWII era. I already have an airbrush for overall finishing (although I may replace that too, but that's for later!). The brushes will be mainly for detail work, along with drybrushing and washes.

I've been pretty good at taking care of the ones I have, but time has taken it's toll on some. I've heard arguments of natural filament vs. synthetic, etc., so want to make sure I get good brushes for work. Brand names, like you've given me, are especially helpful.

Thanks again for all the replies!Smile [:)]

Mark
Ignorance is bliss
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, April 3, 2004 10:37 PM
Might i suggest Tamiya brand. I have used one for more than a year, painting everything from cockpits to final drybrushing, and its almost as good as new. Favorite brush. will never get rid of it. also, its easy to clean, and the bristles dont fall out (testors im looking in your direction) but i only use acryl's so that might be part of it
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Tuesday, April 13, 2004 11:48 PM
I'm a fan of synthetic brushes. (I probably should add that my principal interest is ship models, and that I use acrylic paint - Polyscale and Testor's - almost exclusively.) The Testor's brushes are good, but you can find a huge, reasonably-priced assortment at an art supply or arts and crafts store. Firms like Grumbacher make synthetic brushes (I like both the white and gold kinds) in a wide variety of shapes and sizes.

For really fine detail there's no substitute for the feel and texture of a high-quality red sable. But for everything else, I'm converted to the cause of synthetics.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    March 2004
  • From: Placerville, CA USA
Posted by Mark Joyce on Wednesday, April 14, 2004 12:05 AM
Thanks for the recommendations. All the information is very useful in my decision-making!

Mark
Ignorance is bliss
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posted by zokissima on Wednesday, April 14, 2004 9:19 AM
For acrylics, I actually use Warhammer brushes. I started with warhammer a while ago, and their brushes are great. Top quality sable, very thin all the way to very thick. Clean easily, bristles have never fallen out, and I find them absolutely perfect.
For all my enamel work, I use grumbacher brushes.
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