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Sanding block

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  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Sanding block
Posted by missileman2000 on Wednesday, March 2, 2022 2:08 PM

Got tired of wrapping a piece of sandpaper around a small scrap of wood, and decided I need a real sanding block.  I googled sanding blocks and found nothing small enough.  Decided to make my own.  Used a scrap of 1 x 2 pine.  Simple cut with my scroll saw.  The result is about 2 inches long by 3/4 wide (width of 1 x 2).  Made the notches a little too small so I could fine-tune with a circular needle file.  Took fifteen minutes not including drying time for wood stain.  Works great.

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Wednesday, March 2, 2022 4:15 PM

Lookin' really noble!

Years ago I've bought a block of cork that is rather big, but fits my hand nicely - it's about 2''x3''x4'' with five flat sides and one of the large faces has it's edges cut at an angle. I wrap it in sanding paper and fasten it to the block with two flat thumbtacks. Works for me.

And when I started using a sanding block about 25 years ago it was a big advancement in my modelling technology - with it I was able to get nice flat surfaces - like when mating two halves of a hull or something like that.

Thanks for sharing and thanks for reading, too!

Have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, March 3, 2022 3:21 PM

missileman2000

Got tired of wrapping a piece of sandpaper around a small scrap of wood, and decided I need a real sanding block.  I googled sanding blocks and found nothing small enough.  Decided to make my own.  Used a scrap of 1 x 2 pine.  Simple cut with my scroll saw.  The result is about 2 inches long by 3/4 wide (width of 1 x 2).  Made the notches a little too small so I could fine-tune with a circular needle file.  Took fifteen minutes not including drying time for wood stain.  Works great.

What did you use to make the retaining bars that hold the paper in place, Don?

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Thursday, March 3, 2022 7:29 PM

the Baron

 

 
missileman2000

Got tired of wrapping a piece of sandpaper around a small scrap of wood, and decided I need a real sanding block.  I googled sanding blocks and found nothing small enough.  Decided to make my own.  Used a scrap of 1 x 2 pine.  Simple cut with my scroll saw.  The result is about 2 inches long by 3/4 wide (width of 1 x 2).  Made the notches a little too small so I could fine-tune with a circular needle file.  Took fifteen minutes not including drying time for wood stain.  Works great.

 

What did you use to make the retaining bars that hold the paper in place, Don?

 

Those are 1/8" aluminum tubing, a bit softer than brass, so they could deform a bit as I press them into place.

 

  • Member since
    August 2021
Posted by lurch on Thursday, March 3, 2022 8:47 PM

Thats a great idea Don. Thank you for sharing the info.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Friday, March 4, 2022 1:03 PM

Thanks, Don!  Sorry for another followup, but how are they attached to the block?

I'm curious because I've made larger blocks, for woodworking.  I took two scraps of 2x4, drilled a hole through the center of face, and use a bolt and wing nut to close it.  I counter-sank the hole on the sanding face, to accommodate the head of the bolt.  I like your design, but I can't see how the retaining bars are held in place.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Saturday, March 5, 2022 8:46 AM

the Baron

Thanks, Don!  Sorry for another followup, but how are they attached to the block?

I'm curious because I've made larger blocks, for woodworking.  I took two scraps of 2x4, drilled a hole through the center of face, and use a bolt and wing nut to close it.  I counter-sank the hole on the sanding face, to accommodate the head of the bolt.  I like your design, but I can't see how the retaining bars are held in place.

 

Quick answer is friction.  By using the needle file to slowly make the hole (or semi-hole) larger, I stopped when the paper and tube just fit into the notch.  At that point friction holds everything in place.  You have to go slowly with the enlargement and trial fitting but it only took me about two minutes.

 

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Monday, March 7, 2022 9:10 AM

Ah! I think I see-the paper fits into the groove, and then you pop the aluminum tube into the groove.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Tuesday, March 8, 2022 8:15 AM

Yep.

 

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