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Whatcha think? (Pounce Wheel)

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  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Savannah, GA USA
Whatcha think? (Pounce Wheel)
Posted by Bones-coa on Tuesday, October 5, 2004 7:47 PM
Don't know if anyone has seen this, but I thought I'd post it here anyway and see what everyone thought

http://www.largescaleplanes.com/reviews/NonKit/DOUSEK/riveter/riveter.htm

Anyone had a chance yet to try one? What's it going for in the US?

Thanks.
Dana F On the bench: Tamiya DO335B-2 with LOTS of Aires stuff (On Hold) Trumpeter A-10 with LOTS and LOTS of aftermarket goodies! (On Hold) Tamiya 240ZG (In work)
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: USA
Posted by MusicCity on Tuesday, October 5, 2004 8:58 PM
I haven't tried one, but I've seen something awful similar to that in places like Hobby Lobby. It's used for something in sewing (I have no idea what though), and I bet it's cheaper that way :)
Scott Craig -- Nashville, TN -- My Website -- My Models Page
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, October 5, 2004 10:02 PM
Hmmmmmm looks kind of like a pastry cutter wheel...for cutting dough when making pastry shells with different edges.

I wonder? Hmmmm don't know that I would have a use for it any time soon, I suppose if the need ever arises I'll give my pastry tool a try first.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 6, 2004 12:47 AM
you are thinking of fabric pattern engraver, not pastry wheel. my mom sews alot, and i learn a bit, and the wheel resembles a carbon paper wheel. if you dont want to spring for this product, a wheel from the tailor might be a good substitute.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 6, 2004 1:06 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by reggiethedorf

you are thinking of fabric pattern engraver, not pastry wheel. my mom sews alot, and i learn a bit, and the wheel resembles a carbon paper wheel. if you dont want to spring for this product, a wheel from the tailor might be a good substitute.


No I'm actually refering to a pastry tool that looks identical to that except it has a plastic handle put out by the pampered chef company...I have one sitting in my kitchen "junk" drawer.

But it really doesn't matter does it....someone is selling that for models. You can get something similair from Joanns Fabrics, and you can get something similair from Pampered Chef for cutting filo dough and pastry shells/dough...
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 6, 2004 1:23 AM
Sounds to me like another one of those "new" tools for the specialist modeler that is in actuality taken from another hobby/industry repackaged and the price jacked up to make it seem more worthwhile.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 6, 2004 6:43 AM
model museum : maybe, maybe not. it soudns like petr has actually taken the idea, but its custom manufactured. as for the price, i have to agree that its a little high, but things are worth it as long as you are willign to pay for it.

chris: what is the pastry tool used for ? i know cooking utensils fairly well, ive never seen something like that. is it for perforating filo pastry? ive never seen something like this in singapore
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 6, 2004 7:16 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by reggiethedorf

model museum : maybe, maybe not. it soudns like petr has actually taken the idea, but its custom manufactured. as for the price, i have to agree that its a little high, but things are worth it as long as you are willign to pay for it.


Actually not really my Wife is into quilting and is using the very same tools, same features are advertised for her stuff.
Example:
Tried holding a plastic ruler against airplane body and run the wheel along it without moving the ruler??
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 6, 2004 10:26 AM
You know Reggie, to be honest I've never used it...it was one of those "courtesy" gifts that a host/hostess gets for holding parties like Pampered Chef and Tupperware...

My wife had a party a while back and the sales rep gave it to her and told her it was a "pastry tool". I know don't think they sell them through pampered chef anymore as I looked on thier site not even 10 minutes ago to find a picture and they didn't have it listed. I would believe that it could be used for perforating Filo dough, or something else. To be honest with ya, I never saw one until she got this one....I've seen the sewing tool, not sure what thats used for either. To be honest....the pastry tool seems kinda useless to me especially not knowing really what its for....and the fact that I don't make pastries. LOL And if I want to do something with Filo dough....well the only thing I would want to do with that is make Baklava, and I'd rather buy it from the local Greek rest than make it....so you got me...I know I cant throw it away, though! Orders from the boss....

I know thier pizza stone is great along with some other products....but I have yet to find a modeling related use for them. HEHE Wink [;)]
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 6, 2004 5:40 PM
well then stick to the *burp* non modelling application !
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: South Carolina
Posted by jlwilliams on Wednesday, October 6, 2004 6:12 PM
Pounce wheels are used to perforate paper patterns then dust with contrasting powders that go through the paper onto the fabric. Fresco painters used the same techniques to get there drawings onto the plaster. Pastry and pizza doughs need to be perforated to prevent air pockets from getting too large.

Boy do I ever read too much to know such trivia!!Propeller [8-]
J. Lee Williams 2007 New Year's Resolution: Complete a group build 2008 New Year's Resolution: Complete a group build on time You load 16 tons and what do you get? Another day older and deeper in debt! In my stash gallery: http://pics.jamesjweg.com/gallery/3989211
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, October 6, 2004 8:19 PM
i live and learn
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, October 7, 2004 1:03 AM
Our local tailor uses the same device and he calls it a tracing wheel. I've seen him replicate designs or artwork from paper patterns onto cloth with it. Not sure though if it comes in different teeth spacings which we modelers can use for various scales. If not then it seems Dousek's tools may be the only way to go for riveting.

Cheers,
onyan
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Central USA
Posted by qmiester on Thursday, October 7, 2004 5:55 AM
I've never used one on plastic models but many years ago when a lot of the flying model mags would give you full size plans for a model, I would use one of my grandmothers pounce wheels to transfer the lines on the plans to the balsa wood. They do come in various sizes. MicroMark carried a set of three or four of different sizes for several years in their catalog. Don't know if they still carry it though. As far as holding a ruler and using the wheel, what's the difference between that and using a scriber?
Quincy
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, October 7, 2004 7:03 AM
less slippage and more control id guess. think of it this way : which is easier to steer, ice skates or a car with snow tires
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, October 8, 2004 12:42 PM
QUOTE: Tried holding a plastic ruler against airplane body and run the wheel along it without moving the ruler??
Masking tape is your friend. Use something thin and flexible for your straightedge (styrene or thin metal), tape it down at one end so it doesn't skate around too much, then verify the correct position and tape it down good. Works like a champ.
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