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Newbie Questions: Xuron shears and Glue

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Newbie Questions: Xuron shears and Glue
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 6, 2005 7:17 PM
Hello all

I've been lurking around this forum for about a week now, its time to start posting.

First a little history.. I haven't touched a model in 20 years. This Christmas my wife got me the NX-01 kit from Polar Lights. I think she meant it as a gag, but now she has stirred up a whole world of trouble! Big Smile [:D]

I started looking around and learned that a lot has changed in 20 years. I remeber Tube Glue and Enamel paints form Testors, and that was about it. I tried a liquid cement on some of my later models, but was discuraged when it frosted my canopies. Now I have played with Tamiya Acrylics and LOVE them. I am thinking it is time to try some more new stuff. I have a lot more money and patience then I did when I was 16 and am really looking forward to this.

So my questions..

1 Many in the tools forum swear by their Xuron cutters... but just which cutter is everyone talking about? The Ultraflush Cutting Shear? The High Precision Shear? The High Precision Scissor? The Modeller's Scissor? or All of the Above??

2a Glues.. I love my Tamiya Paints, I would think their glues would work well too. Unfortunately, my LHS is 90 mi away so I am mostly shopping online. I have yet to find a source which has it is stock. If I do find it should I get the Thin or the Regular? or Both??

2b In the likely event that I can't fing Tamiya glue.. I can get Ambroid. When everyone is spekaing of Ambroid liquid glue; do you mean "Pro Weld" or something else?

2c Is a 'Touch -n- Flow' necessary for liquid glue? Is it just very helpful? or Is it just a fun tool / toy? (any of those reasons will be good enough to get one).

Thank you all for your time

I am enjoying relearning what a great hobby this is.

Yolev
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: USA
Posted by MusicCity on Sunday, February 6, 2005 9:39 PM
Welcome back. I'm sure you'll have a great time here and playing with all the new modeling materials. Many of us here have done basically the same thing. I built my first model about 40+ years ago, quit a while, build a while, quit a while, build a while. You are right in that things have changed over the past 20 years, and in most cases the changes were for the better.

QUOTE:
1 Many in the tools forum swear by their Xuron cutters... but just which cutter is everyone talking about? The Ultraflush Cutting Shear? The High Precision Shear? The High Precision Scissor? The Modeller's Scissor? or All of the Above??

Mine look more like the "410A Ultraflush Cutting Shear" but they aren't Xuron. I got them at Michaels in the section pertaining to beading (bead necklaces, etc.) They cost about half what the Xuron shears do, and appear to be virtually identical. Look in your newspaper if there is a Michaels near you since they frequently have 40% off coupons in the paper.

Michaels, Hobby Lobby, and other stores that pertain to hobbies like beading, sewing, art work, etc. are great places to find tools. They also have sets of very small files that are invaluable in modeling.

QUOTE:
2a Glues.. I love my Tamiya Paints, I would think their glues would work well too. Unfortunately, my LHS is 90 mi away so I am mostly shopping online. I have yet to find a source which has it is stock. If I do find it should I get the Thin or the Regular? or Both??

2b In the likely event that I can't fing Tamiya glue.. I can get Ambroid. When everyone is spekaing of Ambroid liquid glue; do you mean "Pro Weld" or something else?

I haven't used Tamiya glue but I hear very good things about it. I usually use either Tenax 7R or Ambroid Pro Weld. Both work very well.

QUOTE:
2c Is a 'Touch -n- Flow' necessary for liquid glue? Is it just very helpful? or Is it just a fun tool / toy? (any of those reasons will be good enough to get one).

It's more than a toy and less than a necessity. You can use a small brush for applying the thin glues, but an applicator works very well. I don't have a Touch 'n Flow because I keep forgetting to order one, but I made something similar out of a hypodermic needle that works great.

Scott Craig -- Nashville, TN -- My Website -- My Models Page
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, February 7, 2005 11:38 AM
Thank you for the quick response.... off shoping now

Yolev
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: NYC, USA
Posted by waikong on Monday, February 7, 2005 11:51 AM
I use the Xuron ultraflush for cutting pieces off the sprue, helps minimize filling later on. I haven't used their scissors, but have similair ones for cutting decals - they are great fot getting into ting corners.

I use both Testors liqudi glue, Tamiya thn & regular. Both types have brushes in the bottle so the touch n'flow is not a nesscity. I've used Tenex before and foudn that it evaporated very quickely, so you have to combine the pieces first and there's where the touch n' flow comes in handy. The Tamiya thin doesn't evaporate as quickly so the brush works okay. The regular is very similar to Testors liquid, both give you a much longer working time - the Tamiya is seems to melt the plastic more though and the odor is much stronger.

Welcome to the forum and back to the hobby.

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posted by zokissima on Tuesday, February 8, 2005 6:41 AM
Hi. Welcome back to the hobby.

I have not used the Xuron, as they appear to be way overpriced. However, like MM, I saw some really nice tools in Michael's the other day, and am waiting my next payday to go out and get them.

I bought a bottle of Tamiya regular cement about two years ago, and since then have used it exclusively. I love it. Easy to apply, and it works like a charm. Many say that the extra thin is better for whatever reason. It dries quicker, but I find that the regular gets tacky and holds in a few seconds, so try it out. I'm sure that if anything, you won't dislike it, and if you find it's not up to par, try the extra thin.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, February 11, 2005 4:16 AM
I'd like to add my "welcome back" as well. I actually got back into the hobby in early 1987 and have built (on and off, time permiting) every since then--always acquiring unbuilt kits--one of the by-products of this hobby is a largish kit collection. (I must have several hundred still unbuilt.) Like you, I've only started posting to the Forum--but I've actually lurked around here for some time.

When it comes to sprue cutters, I use several. I'm always happy with the "house brand" cutters I've purchased from Squadron Mail Order. They look identical to the ones mentioned (above) as being available at Michaels and Hobby Lobby. They make a clean, flush cut on normal styrene sprues. On the thick sprues seen on most limited run plastic and resin models, I use a fine-tooth razor saw, finishing them up with several files. For photo-etched detail parts, I use a Xuron Micro Sheer--it does a fabulous job on the thin metal of photo-etched frets.. I recommend these to you.

For glue recomendations, I use Tenex 7R liquid cement (general construction), superglue (various vescosities, as the job requires) and either Elmer's or a watch crystal cement for clear parts--both clean up easily with rubbing alchohol and of course won't craze the plastic. For resin parts I use either a two-part epoxie or superglue. I also use various types of glue applicators, depending on the job: from tooth picks to specialized metal applicators. I've ordered many of my (replacement) tools from the Micro-Mark catalog or their website when they have sales.

Hope these recomdendations are of some help.

--Ken

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