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model train to working train

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  • Member since
    November, 2015
model train to working train
Posted by modelbuilder81 on Monday, November 09, 2015 2:36 PM

Hello,

Im Joe and I'm a newbie to the forum scene and been a fan of FSM for a few years. I was hoping if anyone can tell me how to make a 1:87 scale BR 41 german locomotive into a electric locomotive that runs on track. I hope that came out right. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.Cool

  • Member since
    August, 2007
  • From: back country of SO-CAL, at the birth place of Naval Aviation
Posted by DUSTER on Tuesday, November 10, 2015 7:00 PM

First Welcome to the forum

About you conversion idea I cant help but I'm sure there are others here, that can give you some ideas. 

Steve

Building the perfect model---just not quite yet  Confused

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 3:56 AM

Hello!

I guess the easiest way (still not very easy!) would be to find a running engine in that scale, so that the axles and such match, and then just transplant the top on it. Sometimes in models like that the actual motor is hidden in the tender of the engine, and the model of the engine is just rolling - that allows for better looks of the engine, as it has to be "see through" - there's a space between the frame and the boiler through which you should be able to see from one side to the other. Hope it helps, good luck with your project and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    November, 2015
Posted by modelbuilder81 on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 7:03 AM
I guess the only thing I'm really concerned about are the connecting rod and arms that make the wheels turn. The parts that come with the kit are always too thick to operate. In my opinion it would be cheaper than buying the track ready kit. They are so expensive. Thanks to everyone for the advice.
  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 2:13 PM

Hello!

In that case you have at least two options - thin the kit parts down, or make them new, like you could design your own custom photo-etch parts - that might be worth a try. Once again - good luck with your project and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 2:22 PM

Hi Joe, welcome to the forum.

I don't think there's any possibility of this working. Getting the connecting rods and valve gear to function, bearings etc. would be the same as starting from scratch. And without a working suspension it would not go around corners. Because you are dealing with a very complicated modern locomotive, the pinnacle of the technology.

Now, doesn't Marklin make, or made one?

Joe just a tip. This particular forum "Suggestions and feedback" is intended as a suggestion box to FSM for comments about the website. Try your question in "General Modeling Discussion", or perhaps "Dioramas".

 

  • Member since
    May, 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Thursday, November 19, 2015 8:58 AM

Welcome to the Forum!

I'll offer another suggestion. Post your question in the Forum operated by Finescale Modeler's sister publication, Model Railroader. All sorts of motors, scratchbuilding parts, and electric gadgets are available from the model railroading specialty companies, and I'm sure lots of folks on the MR forum would know what you need and where to get it.

In the mean time, here's a suggestion from a ship modeler who used to work in a hobby shop. Think about putting the motor in the tender, and using its wheels to pickup the current and push the locomotive. Might be a lot easier - and you wouldn't have to worry about the pistons, drive rods, etc.

Good luck.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    August, 2015
  • From: Northeast Florida
Posted by Arved on Thursday, November 19, 2015 9:53 AM

GMorrison
Now, doesn't Marklin make, or made one?

Yes, Marklin makes one, but Marklin uses an odd AC system with contacts between the rails for the current path. Very non-standard.

You can see there are many models of the BR 41 available here:

http://www.modellbau-wiki.de/wiki/BR_41

Of the manufacturers listed, I think Roco has the best reputation for good running and good detailed models.

Converting a static model would mean putting the running gear from a BR 41 under your model. I would only consider this option if you could find a damaged BR41 model that still ran, and just swap the boiler and cab (with all details). I also presume you'd need to do the same with the tender if that was damaged - most steam locomotives rely on the tender to pick up at least some of the power from the rails.

I hope this helps,

- Arved

e-mail | Blog

"Simplicate and Add Lightness" — design philosophy of Ed Heinemann, Douglas Aircraft

  • Member since
    August, 2015
  • From: Northeast Florida
Posted by Arved on Thursday, November 19, 2015 10:06 AM

jtilley
In the mean time, here's a suggestion from a ship modeler who used to work in a hobby shop. Think about putting the motor in the tender, and using its wheels to pickup the current and push the locomotive. Might be a lot easier - and you wouldn't have to worry about the pistons, drive rods, etc.

A good idea, but there are problems with the torque reaction of the motor that have to be overcome. It allows the locomotive to be filled with as much heavy metal, increasing tractive effort, but the torque problem must be overcome.

OTOH, the tender is nearly the perfect place for a sound decoder and speaker, although, technically, it would be better if the speaker was near the exhaust stack and cylinders - that's the loudest part of a real locomotive, and some people are put off by the sound eminating from the wrong end of the locomotive.

Another resource to consider is the Locomotive Repower group on Yahoo. Pay particular attention to the postings by Ken Clark, and if you converse with him, tell him I sent you and told you to say hi for me.

- Arved

e-mail | Blog

"Simplicate and Add Lightness" — design philosophy of Ed Heinemann, Douglas Aircraft

  • Member since
    November, 2015
Posted by modelbuilder81 on Thursday, November 19, 2015 10:31 AM

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Thank you everyone for the advice and tips and I'll keep chugging along to make this little progress a sucess..Thanks again. Hope you all have a blessed day!

 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by jibber on Thursday, November 19, 2015 6:59 PM

What if you just cut off the German locomotive body and place it on another frame and motor. 

Terry

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