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Shep Paine Passed - What does it mean ?

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  • Member since
    August, 2008
Shep Paine Passed - What does it mean ?
Posted by tankerbuilder on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 8:32 AM

Alas ;

      I do write this with a heavy heart .The one man in the modeling world I looked up to , that was younger than I . What does this mean to us modelers ? If you pay attention to the world around you , you'll see it isn't a young one for a lot of us .

    The next question is this . How many Shep Paines have we met ? How many younger folks see us as their Shep Paines ? Scary thought isn't it ? Shep taught many of us to bend , stretch and completely throw that barrier to our skills away .

       Now this is a fact . How many awards do you have , because you went beyond even yourself , because of a Shep inspired moment ? One , Two , More ? Look at each model and see if you can discover a little of your Shep inspired moment in the build . He gave all of us so much .

            When I started MINSHIPCO , I was scared and apprehensive .When years later I am still cruising along creating , I think back to my one meeting with Shep . I had done my first Figure Model .( I only do these for me .To sharpen shading and toning skills . ) He looked at it and calmly said , " this is your first "? I replied in the positive , and he said " Well Done "

      I didn't win anything , But having met Him and talked to him and having him compliment me was like a "  Best of Show " to me . Shep will surely be missed .Those are Very large shoes to fill  .Is anyone out there up to it ? If you can do it like he did , that will be the greatest testimony to the effect he had on all of us . To Teach , To Build and enjoy the ART of modeling .That's definitely what Shep left with me .

         Shep , Check us out  from time to time and let your messenger angel light the spark anew . We'll miss you .    Tanker - Builder

  • Member since
    January, 2014
  • From: Nampa, Idaho
Posted by jelliott523 on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 8:49 AM

Excellent words TB, I agree that most of us have those one or two individuals, who have taken the time to compliment us on our work or give us tips and advice to try something new.  I know I do.  To those who have helped and encouraged me, THANK YOU!!!

On the Bench:  Lots of unfinished projects!  Smile

  • Member since
    July, 2015
Posted by CheesyMeatBurrito on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 9:47 AM

I guess I'm just too young. I know of him, and have seen his work and old books from his "heyday" if you will. I was never particularly inspired by it. And I can't recall ever hearing much about him for years until the stroke and ultimate death. I can understand that older folks are disheartened about his loss. I suspect some of the stuff that actually has inspired me came from people who were inspired by him in their youths. Frankly, I don't think his stuff holds up very well to modern work.

  • Member since
    May, 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 11:13 AM

Normally I'm leery of name-dropping in model building. I don't like phrases like, "if you're really into airplane models you're undoubtedly familiar with the work of...," or "those who know the ship model world know the work of...." Frequently I've never heard of the people in question - and in any case, there's enough of the "cult of the individual" in the rest of the world without extending it into the realm of hobbies.

But there are exceptions. In ship modeling (my personal favorite), a few people, like E. Armitage McCann, August Crabtree, Charles Davis, Norman Ough, and Donald McNarry have not only built outstanding models but exerted a long-term influence on modeling, and provided an inspiration that has endured for decades.

Mr. Paine, in my opinion, belongs in that category. I'm no expert on military miniatures, or any of the other genres in which he specialized. But I know enough about him to know he was a giant in the field - a driving force that drove modelers and manufacturers alike to make scale modeling a genuine form of art. He will indeed be missed.

On the other hand, we're lucky in the legacy he left behind. His models, his articles, and his books will continue to inspire additional generations.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 11:43 AM

As a modeler, he had many peers. People like Verlinden come to mind.

His contribution was, through Monogram, making the average modeler like the rest of us realize that with a little time, patience and care we could take a $ 3.00 model and make it something to be proud of.

It's just lost now. How many threads start up here with "first time modeler, bought the photo etch, the resin cockpit, the custom decals, etc." and off they go.

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 11:54 AM

Yeah "G"

    I wonder sometimes how they would do with what we had . I built a Stug 3 From Monogram , years ago .My first German Armor model . Did the weathering and all .You know what ? There wasn't any after - Market stuff then . It was dirty , nasty and mean looking . Just because I tried to make an O.O.B model that way . How ? By looking at the Box Cover and what I had in my junk drawer .

     I still build my planes that way . I think it's more enjoyable as it shapes up just the way I want it . If it isn't up to contest standards who cares ? It's mine .     T.B.

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 11:56 AM

Proff ;

    I know precisely what you mean  .I would go to Museums wherever and the ships on display were my inspiration .I still don't know who built some .But I really don't care .They , whoever they were , inspired me to lift my skills up a notch or two .    T.B.

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 11:57 AM

OH :

  By the way , I like your tag-line !

  • Member since
    January, 2007
  • From: Charlotte, North Carolina
Posted by the doog on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 1:40 PM

In one of Shep's "modeling bibles", he wrote something like "...modeling a burnt-out tank is the Holy Grail of modeling and one of the most difficult projects you can attempt.",.

Those words inspired me to do my very popular and extremely successful "SPOOKED!" diorama which was my first story in FSM.

My FOTKI model gallery with most of my best models can be found HERE

My real name is "Karl" Smile

  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Bucks county, PA
Posted by Bucksco on Tuesday, August 04, 2015 2:06 PM

If you cannot appreciate his work or feel that it does not hold up to modern standards it is most likely because you have never seen it firsthand. His box dioramas were a wonder to behold-not just because of what was in them but because they always told a great story. It's one thing to be able to build a nice tank, airplane or figure but it is quite another to use them to tell a narrative. I firmly believe that nobody has ever been able to top him in regard to his diorama work and story telling ability. Those of us who were around when he came on the scene understand what a huge influence he was on the hobby.

  • Member since
    June, 2013
Posted by CharleyGnarlyP290 on Friday, August 07, 2015 8:44 PM

Bingo, Bucksco.

I, like many of my age, grew up with Monogram models and the diorama tips that Shep did for them. After checking those out and reading a few of his books, I realized that where he excelled, in addition to have great modeling abilities, was his knack for dioramas that told a story. They weren't just scenes, or platforms to display his models and/or figures, but stories told in three dimensions. Some of the little things he did were clever and sometimes humorous. Example: yellow snow by the tree in the Monogram Screamin' Mimi diorama.

One of my favorites was the anti-aircraft US halftrack he did for Monogram. There was no doubt about what was going on in the scene. The crew and troops were obviously taking on an enemy plane, even though an aircraft wasn't a visible part of the scene. A rifleman is aiming at the "aircraft" while the twin .50 mount in the back of the halftrack is aiming in the same direction as the rifleman. And the pose of the figures as well as a wounded man proped up against the side of the vehicle receiving first aid, adds to the drama.

I have said it elsewhere, but he is one person I would have liked to have met in person.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Friday, August 07, 2015 11:24 PM

CheesyMeatBurrito -

Pfffftttt.... typical of kids like you. His stuff doesn't hold up to modern work?? How so? Please elaborate. Shep Paine's work are awesome no matter what generation he did them.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, August 07, 2015 11:36 PM

Indeed...

I challenge any of the current gurus to do this with what he had on hand... under the same time constraints...

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Saturday, August 08, 2015 8:12 AM

Holy crap stik! I never saw that one before!

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Saturday, August 08, 2015 9:09 AM

I suppose I'm just gilding the lilly, but Shep did some amazing work.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, August 08, 2015 11:37 AM

stikpusher

Indeed...

I challenge any of the current gurus to do this with what he had on hand... under the same time constraints...

 

And that's $ 2.99 worth of plastic....

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Saturday, August 08, 2015 3:04 PM

Well, the younger moders see pre/post shading, filtering, color modulation, hair spray method, etc as SOP, but I think they don't quite understand that wash/dry brush was the norm back in the day. There was a dearth of aftermarket too.  Offhand I only recall Model Technologies belt buckles and placards, Microscale decals, Waldron punches, and the railroad section of the hobby shops.  Oh, and the coveted McDonalds coffee lids for 0.010 styrene and lead foil off wine bottles.

If one were to look over one of Shep's dioramas and tried to recreate it today, how much reliance on aftermarket would one use?  And the references available today in print and on line is overwhelming compared to the few Profile and Squadron books available in the 1970s.  Shep really knew how to improvise to build those fantastic dioramas.

I think his inspiration to modelers was his greatest gift, and that will stand the test of time. Rest in peace Shep, and thanks for all those great models!

  • Member since
    July, 2015
Posted by CheesyMeatBurrito on Sunday, August 09, 2015 1:17 AM

I bet rivet counters would pick his stuff apart if not for the fondness of his work from their childhood.

Oh yeah lets pile on the folks using aftermarket too. Why not. They couldn't possibly be real modelers. And of course no one could do work as good or better these days. Not like its all over the internet or nothin'.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Sunday, August 09, 2015 9:08 AM

CheesyMeatBurrito

I bet rivet counters would pick his stuff apart if not for the fondness of his work from their childhood.

Oh yeah lets pile on the folks using aftermarket too. Why not. They couldn't possibly be real modelers. And of course no one could do work as good or better these days. Not like its all over the internet or nothin'.

 

 

Wow.... I'm gonna bite my tongue but your comment is borderline arrogant.

  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Cameron, Texas
Posted by Texgunner on Sunday, August 09, 2015 9:13 AM

CheesyMeatBurrito

I bet rivet counters would pick his stuff apart if not for the fondness of his work from their childhood.

Oh yeah lets pile on the folks using aftermarket too. Why not. They couldn't possibly be real modelers. And of course no one could do work as good or better these days. Not like its all over the internet or nothin'.

 

Where is Hans when ya need him?!?!Wink


"All you mugs need to get busy building, and post pics!"

  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Bucks county, PA
Posted by Bucksco on Sunday, August 09, 2015 9:42 AM

Well CheesyMeatBurrito you have accomplished your goal of ruffling feathers. Those of us who understand what an important role Shep Paine played in advancing our hobby toward what it is today will continue to hold him in a special place in our memories no matter how desperately you disparage him. With all the advances that have been made in kit molding technology , aftermarket parts, weathering techniques, etc... there are still very few people out there who can rival his originality and creativity in regard to telling stories with miniatures. His box dioramas were totally original pieces (or should I say pieces of art) that relied on his skills as a sculptor, machinist, woodwoorker, painter and many other skills. How many of us can take an idea and create a diorama from scratch without using any kits? I dare say not many. Having seen all of his dioramas first hand I can unequivocally state that I have never seen anyone come even close to his level. So say what you will but those of us who understand how important his contributions were and how top notch his work was will always hold him in high esteem!

 

From the Finescale Modeler Facebook page:

Sad news: RIP Sheperd Paine, a legend in the world of miniatures. The success of his diorama book led to to a Kalmbach Publishing start-up in 1982 called FineScale Modeler.

  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Scarecrow Joe on Sunday, August 09, 2015 9:48 AM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

 

 

 
CheesyMeatBurrito

I bet rivet counters would pick his stuff apart if not for the fondness of his work from their childhood.

Oh yeah lets pile on the folks using aftermarket too. Why not. They couldn't possibly be real modelers. And of course no one could do work as good or better these days. Not like its all over the internet or nothin'.

 

 

 

 

Wow.... I'm gonna bite my tongue but your comment is borderline arrogant.

 

 

Not only that but extremely ignorant.  Shep was one of a kind, like Jordan to basketball, Bruce Lee to martial arts cinema etc, a true pure talent.  Also he had a most important trait....humility and humbleness, lacking badly, as seen here. Enough said.

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Sunday, August 09, 2015 9:52 AM

I am going to forgive you ;

    What ? Yes you are showing an arrogant disdain for one of the main reasons many got into this hobby . Folks like Shep Paine . Learn to verbally respect where you are ( FSM's Forums ) and where , how and whom you are speaking of .  T.B.

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Sunday, August 09, 2015 9:54 AM

Stik :

 Where did you find this one . My goodness , It's like being a fly on a wave !  T.B.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, August 09, 2015 10:28 AM

Tanker, I had to do quite a bit of image searching to locate a few similar images of the downed TBD diorama. I built most every piece of armor and aircraft that Monogram put out in that era, and that dio flyer in that kit really stuck with me. Why? I can't say for sure, but at the same time I recall an Aero publishers book on the TBD carried at the closest LHS with a James Dietz painting of the TBDs at Midway. And I was also doing a lot of reading on that battle myself. Add in the movie "Midway" coming out a year or so later and lets just say that my young impressionable mind was filled with a certain degree of awe and respect for the courage of those TBD crews at Midway that has stayed with me to this day. The TBD Midway and C-47 D-Day dioramas are probably my two favorites of the aircraft flyers that came with the kits. I still have a couple of the original  Paine flyers from those kits in my collection of stuff, but unfortunately the TBD flyer is not one of them.

Cheesy, I really suggest that you learn about the man's work in this hobby before you dismiss that work. I suspect that Shep could be called one of the original "river counters" as he was constantly accurizing and improving his kit subjects, even on those time constrained Monogram dioramas. But he was not the obnoxious SOB who would pronounce a kit unbuildable because there was details off or a bad fit somewhere like many on the internet today who have their own lordly websites. I bet he would fix it if it mattered to him and drive on. Those kits were not built OOB, but were modified and accurized usiing what limited refernce materials were onhand. As far as Aftermarket goes, lets just say that his stuff helped create the reasons such things exist today. Modelers wanted their builds to go to the next level and created cotttage industries to provided the parts to do so. Today's feast of AM had to start somewhere.

As a side note, at yesterday's AMPS meeting for the local chapter here, I was going thru an issue of one of the latest modeling magazines that showcased some of the latest "schools" of building and finishing with another member, who is far more talented than I. We  both commented on the level of artistry on the kits in the magazine was impressive to look at, at the same time there was a bit of overreach in that direction to achieve that result, that you don't see in Mr Paine's work.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, August 09, 2015 10:32 AM

Off catching bail skippers.

  • Member since
    December, 2004
  • From: Houston, Texas
Posted by panzerpilot on Sunday, August 09, 2015 10:42 AM

I recently ordered his book "how to photograph scale models". I was sorry to hear of his passing, as he was quite an influence to much of our hobby. Incidentally, was he the one who did that famous B-17 diorama in the mid-1970's? The one that was crash landed?

-Tom

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, August 09, 2015 10:46 AM

panzerpilot

I recently ordered his book "how to photograph scale models". I was sorry to hear of his passing, as he was quite an influence to much of our hobby. Incidentally, was he the one who did that famous B-17 diorama in the mid-1970's? The one that was crash landed?

 

Yes, the crash landed B-17 dio was his.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, August 09, 2015 11:12 AM

And "Lady Be Good". That one really resonated with me.

How to make peeling rubber, how to replicate fabric control surfaces. It also "wrote the book" on thinning plastic with a motor tool, something that's now in the basic skill set of most of us.

Anyone remember the old TV movie "Sole Survivor?".

 

  • Member since
    July, 2015
Posted by CheesyMeatBurrito on Sunday, August 09, 2015 11:21 AM

I didn't disparage anyone or dismiss their work. But whatever. At least now I know celebrity worship extends to the modeling community.

I didn't say his work wasn't great, original, masterful, or anything of the sort. I do think it's laughable to suggest there is no equally impressive work in the hobby today. That's just absolutely ridiculous. I know it may be hard to believe if this forum is the only place you see modeling. But come on there is all kind of great stuff out there.

And the passive agressive remarks about people who don't scratchbuild and use aftermarket are insulting. Perhaps people find enjoyment in other areas of the hobby. Maybe I want more detail but dont like cutting and stretching srpue and cutting up coke cans and unspooling speaker wire. Does that make those who do better or more legitimate? Heck no.

 

So what if I use aftermarket? It isn't about the materials used. It's about the finished product and if you're scratchbuilding entire sections of a subject but your paint is uneven and chunky, or you have seam lines unfilled then it's not automatically "better" because you didn't buy your detail.

If you don't like aftermarket don't buy it. I imagine if there had been the expansive presence of aftermarket in his day he would have used some. Clearly if he's been working today with better models, better tools and supplies and better access to aftermarket materials his work would be even better. Because he did have great artistic vision and skill but like it or not was limited by what he had. Thinking that he would have avoided aftermarket is naive. I really think he would have taken every opprotunity to improve his vision even more.

His great works are 30 plus years old. They are still great too. But there is equally great and yes even better stuff out there. I know that may be difficult to understand when you've built a cult of the individual shrine around someone though.

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