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Millennials and Modeling

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  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, October 26, 2018 1:43 PM

falconmod

Yes it's kinda humbling when we become our parents isn't it!

 

Wink

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September, 2011
  • From: Milaca, Minnesota
Posted by falconmod on Friday, October 26, 2018 12:08 PM

Yes it's kinda humbling when we become our parents isn't it!

On the Bench: 1/72 Ki-67, 1/48 Airfix P-51D

1/72 LS Dinah III, 1/72 Hasegawa T-33A

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, October 26, 2018 11:48 AM

Well as some people have pointed out above growing up a Gen-Xer the Boomers kept calling us lazy, shiftless, cynical, and more interested in playing video games than getting ahead. The same thing older people keep throwing at the Millenials... 

I think every generation makes the same accusations at the young guys and gals. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September, 2011
  • From: Milaca, Minnesota
Posted by falconmod on Friday, October 26, 2018 11:25 AM

TankerEasy

 

Per the internets, millennials start in 1984, making me part of that group (born in 88').  I was modeling as a kid because my dad did, and in turn i got into it.  I will admit I just got back into it earlier this year, but none the less I love it.  I can see reading through some of the replies that there’s a big misconception of those of us classified as "millennials"..  Keep in mind folks, its baby boomers and gen x'ers that created millennials due to poor parenting... so some of you might wanna take a long hard look at your own generation for the crap shoot we’ve ended up with, and remember were not all bad Whistling WinkCool

 

*not trying to offend anyone, but when my age group gets targeted like it does on the regular, i feel it’s necessary to defend it, the generations created this monster lol**

Valid statement and Yes I think we BB  are guilty as charged!

 

On the Bench: 1/72 Ki-67, 1/48 Airfix P-51D

1/72 LS Dinah III, 1/72 Hasegawa T-33A

  • Member since
    June, 2018
Posted by TankerEasy on Friday, October 26, 2018 11:19 AM

 

Per the internets, millennials start in 1984, making me part of that group (born in 88').  I was modeling as a kid because my dad did, and in turn i got into it.  I will admit I just got back into it earlier this year, but none the less I love it.  I can see reading through some of the replies that there’s a big misconception of those of us classified as "millennials"..  Keep in mind folks, its baby boomers and gen x'ers that created millennials due to poor parenting... so some of you might wanna take a long hard look at your own generation for the crap shoot we’ve ended up with, and remember were not all bad Whistling WinkCool

 

*not trying to offend anyone, but when my age group gets targeted like it does on the regular, i feel it’s necessary to defend it, the generations created this monster lol**

 

Air Force vet (2006-2012)

PC gamer, rig specs: i7-7700K (overclocked), MSI GTX 1080 gpu, 16 gigs G.skill Trident Z ram, Phanteks case with purdy lights CoolCool

Recently completed: 1/35 Tamiya PBR "PIBBER"

On the bench: 1/24 Revell Mustang Super Stallion

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Friday, October 26, 2018 2:08 AM

I’m a Gen-Xer through and through, and my interest in modeling came from my dad.  Even though he didn’t build models, he pasted them together when I was too small to do it myself.  He lived through WW II, but couldn’t serve due to a high school football injury.  Maybe that’s why he was so interested in studying it so much.  My two uncles did serve as infantry in Italy, but they never wanted to be reminded of the experience, much less tell stories about it.

So as it was my dad shared his interest in stuff like WW II naval warfare and ship design.  He always took the time to explain stuff, like the hows and whys.  I gravitated to airplanes because they zoomed around in the air and had dogfights.  I grew up during Vietnam, and night after night watched helos and jets blasting stuff on TV.  Bombs were mostly dumb back then, so planes had the “Christmas tree” look, slinging dozens of Mk-82s and such.  So that’s why I was an airplane guy.

But the Millennials have different experiences.  Their parents might have served in the various gulf wars, so their interest most likely leans to the modern stuff.  And yeah there are video games, the Internet, and hipster joints all vying for their interest.

And then there is the 18.5 meter tall mobile suit standing in the room.

I was an early fan of Gundam, buying my first such kit in 1983.  I had no idea who or what Gundam was, but the bad guys looked so cool!  And then the anime boom hit the US and I gleefully rode the wave of merchandise coming from Japan.

By the time the TV shows aired on cable here, I was already a serious fan.  But I think most people got their first look at Gundam on Cartoon Network, so naturally they liked the stuff from those shows.  I must admit I was surprised that Gundam took off in popularity in the US because the franchise had a somewhat rocky start.  Nevertheless, it seems to have gotten its second wind, and like it or not, it’s here to stay.

But not all hope is lost.  I have a good friend that is a millennial, and while he started out as a Gundam fan, he is now getting into WW II planes and armor because he knows little about them and finds them interesting(!).

The cadre of old modeler farts I hang out with encourage him, tell him interesting factoids about what he is building, help him with information regarding details and paint schemes, and of course shower him with appropriate kits from multiple stashes.  AND we don’t ride him about accuracy.  We tell him it’s his model and his decision on how to go about finishing it.  But he tries his best to get it right and enjoys doing so.

So super long story short, I think it is up to the older generations to introduce the youngsters to save the hobby.  This has always been the case.  I noticed a lot of my peers are not really into doing that.  They are too occupied counting rivets on their own projects. Maybe it is WE who are different, not the young ‘uns?  “To understand the problem, look not at the dying trees in the forest, but rather the soil and water which nutures them.”

And now must I my Yoda hat remove, and to your regularly scheduled program return you.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by seastallion53 on Friday, October 26, 2018 12:23 AM

Where i live in norcal,any hobby shop has been taken over by the rc hobby industry.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, October 25, 2018 9:37 PM

My son has gotten into Gundams and other anime based models. Ill bet there are forums out there for that genre that are populated by their builders/fans. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December, 2013
Posted by chango on Thursday, October 25, 2018 4:27 PM

I was a bit shocked when I visited my LHS the other day and found at least 1/2 of the kit section had been taken over by Gundam/anime stuff. The guy at the store told me he sells more of 'em than every other kit genre combined by a wide margain... come to find out that stuff was basically keeping his business alive.

 

I know it's not a bunch of grey-hairs buying that stuff, so yeah, millenials build models. They just don't seem to frequent forums. 

  • Member since
    June, 2018
Posted by E Baker on Thursday, October 25, 2018 11:13 AM

I am one of the few "youngins" to actually get into modeling, and enjoy it. I started when I was 15, and have been working at it for 2 years now(I am 17, for those of you who cannot do math). I am kind of the "outlier", in that instead of someone introducing me to modeling, I brought myself in, and have built roughly 35-40 aircraft (including the B-36 that is my profile pic). In response to the bit on bringing in more people to the modeling community, I have helped one of my freinds built a Tamiya 1/35 walker bulldog kit.

  • Member since
    October, 2018
Posted by mwhit28 on Tuesday, October 23, 2018 3:08 PM

Just like everything else in life.  Being a veteran and part of the VFW I hear that all the time, how do we get younger members?  And the sad truth is your not going to right now.  I'm 37, born in 1980 and depending on who you talk to I am either at the tail end of the Gen Xers or the beginning of the Millennials.  Of course most of us born between 78-84 kinda tend to think of ourselves as neither because while we have characteristics of both, we don't quite fit the mold completely.  

  But anyway, the fact is most of your Millennials are just really starting to settle down in life.  And unlike the generations before, the Millennials seem to be waiting later to have kids.  So where before people would be 40 and their kids would be about out the door, now your seeing alot of people waiting until their mid to late 30s to have kids.  

  For me, I am just now getting back into this hobby (and realizing I have a long way to go to be even remotely decent at it) after taking a nearly 20 year break from it.  But that is because life has gotten in the way.  But I will say that after sitting on a computer at work all day, and after the kids have gone to bed, it is really relaxing to just sit down in my chair, pull my little hobby table over, have a cup of coffee and start working on a model.  And while my work is still subpar to just about anyone, I am learning new things and getting better at it.  So it works for me.  

  And I think as the millennials start getting up there in age, there will be some who will start to realize that the technology is nice but is too demanding of our time and will want a break from it and will have the time and space to take it back up.

  I just joined a local IPMS club here and while I have only been to one meeting so far (was their annual auction too which was nice) the people I have met so far are pretty nice and seem to range from mid 20s on up.  

 

  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by Reasoned on Monday, May 21, 2018 7:31 PM
Three words, Fortnite, Fortnite and the next Fortnite.

Science is the pursiut of knowledge, faith is the pursuit of wisdom.  Peace be with you.

On the Tarmac: 1/48 Revell P-38

In the Hanger: A bunch of kits

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Monday, May 21, 2018 1:34 AM

I hire a lot of these kids ( and my own fit the cohort).  I find them to run the gamut of kids I hired 15 years ago.  Most are extremely good problem solvers, which video games actually develop.  And there are a couple of social network addicts which I have to call out. 

As a software engineering manager, a lot of these kids are home run hitters.  

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    September, 2015
  • From: The Redwood Empire
Posted by Aaronw on Monday, May 21, 2018 1:24 AM

Someone is buying all the Gundam and StarWars kits, I doubt it is the senior citizens that dominate modeling forums. One of the model sites I frequent did a poll recently and 75%+ of the respondents were over 50. 

 

I think there is more than just age involved. My dad has built models my whole life, he got me started young and we continue to inspire each other with new (or old) techniques.

My brother never showed any interest in models, and neither did my Uncle (my dad's brother).

My best friend from elementary school built models and still does. His brother and sister never have, and I don't think his dad did either.

My oldest has shown very limited interest, but my younger son seems quite enthralled in watching me at work (he is 4), I think I've got a modeler in training there.

 

ItWasForetold

My girlfriend supports it, because she knows I’m just sitting in the garage and not out at the bar.

I honestly think the larger reason why it's dying off... it's not cool... plain and simple. Everyone I know already KNOWS that I'm a nerd, so it's not that big of a deal to me. But when I run across someone knew, or have a party and people see a model they always go "ohhh, that's so cute, you're like a real nerd".

 

I had a young guy on my crew a few years back. He was 19 or 20, had the nerve to be born the year I started in fire... darn whippersnapers making us "experienced" guys feel old.

Anyway I was talking with him one day and mentioned something about a model I was working on, and he got excited, started talking about the models he used to build, how much he enjoyed it. I don't remember exactly how he said it but it was clear that he didn't stop because he didn't like it anymore, but because people told him it was time to grow up and put away the toys.

Maybe like many of us who stopped for a period of time when he is in his 30s and more confident in his "adultness" he will pick it up again.

 

For what it is worth, I'm early Gen X and the older generations said we were lazy, self centered and worthless too. Smile In fact most of what you said about yourself would apply to me and my friends when we were in our late 20s.

 

ygmodeler4

This thread has come around multiple times over the years. The majority of comments in this thread and the past are the reasons I only go to the local model meetings every once in awhile. Online is different because you can't see a person and put an age to that person. That's why I've stuck around on the forums since I joined when I was 15 years old, these forums are generally friendly. But this is the honest truth, modelers are *in my experience* one of the least friendliest group of hobbyists out there. They're great at welcoming the younger age group, i.e. 13 and below, which is great! But howabout the college/recently graduated crowd? 

You wonder why an age group doesn't enjoy your hobby and in the same post disparage and insult them in the same post. All the other hobbies I've had experience with do not act that way. Hunters (another group that is worried about passing on their hobby/sport) are some of the nicest and welcoming folks regardless of age group that I've ever met, even the rough around the edges folks. When a millenial actually chooses to venture to the great outdoors, instead of bashing their age group they welcome them in and show why it's they love doing it and it's a great hobby. Maybe you should do the same. As for me, I'll still go to the meetings once in awhile. I build for my own reasons, probably the same reasons as the majority of you on here. It's certainly not because of the welcoming crowd at the model meetings/LHS/contests though.

 

I've seen this all too many times. Constant bashing of todays youth, and then when some young modelers do have an interest, the subjects they are interested are the "wrong" things and get little attention, or worse negative attention. What positive attention they get is often sideways complements "that looks pretty good for a whatever it is, now the '57 Chevy, that was a real car".

My oldest was born in 2000 so falls into the very tail end of millenials. As a result the comments made about the younger generation hits me as well.

Yes, he fits a lot of the stereotypes, he is into computers, he wants to do things his way, he wants to know why, he likes his phone.

He will also work hard if he can do it his way and he knows why he is doing it. He just wants to know there is a good reason for the effort.

   

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Naples, FL
Posted by tempestjohnny on Sunday, May 20, 2018 7:08 AM

keavdog

I think we are in one of the greatest car eras.  700+ hp, track ready cars from dodge, Ford and Chevrolet,  gtr, new Corvette, Tesla, cool little cars like the Subaru wrx and brz, scion frs, toyota 86, ford focus rs. 

Lots of subject matter and pleanty of young folks moding and tuning.

 

Got a ride in my friends Hellcat a couple of weeks ago. What a car.  Un-freaking-believable

 

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by Sketchy on Sunday, May 20, 2018 6:48 AM

Given how few young people are building models, it’s ironic that the people I’ve learned the most from i.e. YouTube modelers, are mostly young. 

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Saturday, May 19, 2018 6:11 PM

J.J.

 Hi; you are right about this But .I have to add .I belong to a Model Rail Club/Museum .It can get demanding sometimes . I have had thoughts of backing off because of the time commitments !. Probably won't though .

 

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by TheWaggishAmerican on Saturday, May 19, 2018 3:14 PM

This is completely unrelated to modelling, but I so badly want the developers to release an English version of Kantai Collection (Kancolle). It's a japanese exclusive right now- the only way for the very large collection of interested english speakers to play the game involves the use of VPN's, and scouring wikis as you try to simply memorize what buttons do what. Also, if the Fleet Girls concept interests anyone, there is an anime based on the game- 12 episodes and a movie long. 

youtube.com/c/thewaggishamerican

On the Bench- Academy 1/72 OV-10, 1/32 Fiesler Storch, 1/200 Mercury, Gemini, Atlas, Saturn 1b, Saturn V, Monogram 1/72 'Nam- Tour of Duty' F-4J, Tamiya 1/48 Ki-84

 

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  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, May 19, 2018 3:12 PM

I think we are in one of the greatest car eras.  700+ hp, track ready cars from dodge, Ford and Chevrolet,  gtr, new Corvette, Tesla, cool little cars like the Subaru wrx and brz, scion frs, toyota 86, ford focus rs. 

Lots of subject matter and pleanty of young folks moding and tuning.

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Philadelphia Pa
Posted by Nino on Saturday, May 19, 2018 11:45 AM

Waggish American, 
 
     You have brought up terrific points and great observations.  To expound on that as regards the Japanese market you briefly mentioned, I would call attention again to Games.
 
    Games have been mentioned a few times as probable sources of interest for newer generations of modelers. The Game influenced model kits many Warship modelers have seen for sale but may not be fully aware of is KanColle. The boxes depict Japanese "Fleet Girls".
 
 
"KanColle was started in 2013 and rapidly became enormously popular, with over 3 million registered players and growing... Popularity has spun off Manga comic books, light novels, video games, tabletop RPG, audio soundtracks, television anime series and movies. Now one can collect ship models depicting Kanmusus that include full color images of the Kanmusus to place around your model."
 
KanColle & Kanmusu
"Kanmusu means "Ship Girl" and KanColle is the abbreviation for Combined Fleet Girls Collection. Uniquely Japanese, KanColle is a free-to-play web browser game developed by DMM.com with Kadokawa Games. Real historical ships from the WW2 Japanese fleet are personified as girls, given voices, personalities and appearances befitting their ship type."
 
Another Aoshima kit:
( Note: This image for a food replenishment vessel highlights certain attributes of the Kanmusu.)
 
 
 
The Kits in these boxes are the same Sprues as in the normal kit box. Additional game-related items are included however.

  Nino

  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by TheWaggishAmerican on Friday, May 18, 2018 1:11 PM

Also, I was reading through some of the other posts, and I wanted to talk about clubs really quickly. I have been in a modelling club since I was eight or nine years old. I brough in my first model, and kept going back every month that I could for almost a decade. They were alway's nothing but encouraging, giving me tips, teaching me things, etc. No matter how terrible my elementary school models were, they always said that it looked good and then gave me a tip on how to make the next one better. Now that I'm at least competant, and my work has started to come to par with some of the other members, I'm now engaged with questions about MY techniques. 

Beyond being my only serious real-world social "thing", the club involvment helped keep me in the hobby and continue to get better. It is sad that so many others had such negative experience. I suppose that you can't control the people involved, and in the end, the members set the mood. I understand that some might not want younger people around, but I think that the club can be a very positive experience. 

I've also heard a lot of the 'club complaints' say that the club in question was an IPMS chapter. This club isn't- it is just a group of guys who got the LHS owner to agree to let them meet in his back room twice a month to show our models and to chat. Again, I don't know where I was going with that, but I wanted to share my experience with clubs as one of the youngest club-involved people that I know. 

-TheWaggishAmerican

youtube.com/c/thewaggishamerican

On the Bench- Academy 1/72 OV-10, 1/32 Fiesler Storch, 1/200 Mercury, Gemini, Atlas, Saturn 1b, Saturn V, Monogram 1/72 'Nam- Tour of Duty' F-4J, Tamiya 1/48 Ki-84

 

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  • Member since
    September, 2016
Posted by TheWaggishAmerican on Friday, May 18, 2018 1:03 PM

Yo! I'm what's considered a 'late-stage' millenial. When people think of millenials, they think of those kids just gettting through-or already having left- university. Anyway, I am among the youngest possible millenials- the cutoff is usually late 2001, and I was born early 2001. Anyhow, I build models, paint figures (kinda), and work with and design RC airplanes. The hobby is certainly weak with people in my age group- However, I think it's actually growing. Many younger modellers you won't see at the LHS- instead, they buy online. They learn from things like Youtube, and socialize there as well. I don't know that you need the support of millenials- whatever generation comes after that, those are the people who are getting hooked. Just look at the comment sections of large Youtuber's such as QuickKits- they are LOADED with 10+ year olds who have been captured by the hobby, and quickly grow with the help of forums and the ease of the interconnected world. 

Anyway, I've no idea where I was going with that, or if that answered the 'prompt'. I'm technically a millenial, I know a couple others who are, and I've gotten one or two interested- a good way, I've found, is to start with something like Bandai's Gundam stuff! Things that build well, look impressive, and don't require advanced tools or experience to look 'cool'. From there, the rest of the hobby trickles in as they shop around and some other kind of kit catches their eye. 

What I think is in trouble are car models. Millenials are less interested in cars than just about any other generation since cars hit the market. I think this is shown in the remarkably low number's with driver's liscenses, along with the "plateau" in the car industry- car's are basically the same, with only the slightest cosmetic differences. It's not like the vehicle heyday in the 80's and 90's, with a new, badass looking car coming out seemingly every week. 

Plus, you've got to take into account the difference in location. In the US, younger modelers are definentely in the minority. However, look to places like Europe, where many of the manufacturers are. The model market is much better there. Or especially Japan, where the hobby has been on an incline pretty much since the late 70's. 

I don't think that the hobby will be lost by any means. 

One final thing, I think that as millenials age, they might pick it up. How many of you left the hobby around high school or college, only to get back into it 10 or 20 years later?

youtube.com/c/thewaggishamerican

On the Bench- Academy 1/72 OV-10, 1/32 Fiesler Storch, 1/200 Mercury, Gemini, Atlas, Saturn 1b, Saturn V, Monogram 1/72 'Nam- Tour of Duty' F-4J, Tamiya 1/48 Ki-84

 

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  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, May 18, 2018 9:04 AM

On reflection, its not really surpriseing that we don't see many millennials in the hobby. They are now in that age bracket that i am sure many here went through where model building had been put ashide for family, work and all the other things that come in your 20's and 30's. I think its fair to say that most members here went through that as well and came back into the hobby in their 40's. Of course there are always those who don't take that break, we have a couple of here now modelling in their 20's and i was in the same position in that i never really stopped.

So if any of the millenials did build models when they were younger, they are the ones we can hope will come back into the hobby over the next 10 to 20 years. As far as the hobby goes, the real concern would be the lack of those who came after the millennials. Our model club has no junior members and at shows you see very few children coming along.

  • Member since
    May, 2018
  • From: Commonwealth of Virginia
Posted by VA Spartan on Friday, May 18, 2018 7:44 AM

I agree with Sketchy on his characterization of the millennials at the bottom of the post.  Most of the one I know are very impressive!

On the workbench: 1/35 Takom T-54B; 1/35 Tamiya Char B1bis w/French Infantry; 1/48 Tamiya Fairey Swordfish Mk. 1

  • Member since
    April, 2018
Posted by Sketchy on Friday, May 18, 2018 5:43 AM

I haven’t seen many young people at the hobby shops I frequent, or the couple of shows I’ve been to, but all my millennial friends at work are always interested in what I’m building and want to see photos of everything.  But for younger people, the spare time needed must be an issue. I work in the bike industry and we all ride and race our bikes a lot, which leaves very little time for other hobbies.  Not to mention these kids have a very active social life! I’m 57 and don’t ride as much as my friends, and my girlfriend and I are semi antisocial, which gives me ample time to indulge.  

I never would have had time when I was younger, or the space, or the disposable income. Housing is incredibly expensive where I live. Actually everything is expensive. But now that I’m older I have a little more time and money.

As a side note, and I know this is merely anecdotal, but all the millennials I work with are smart, diligent, and conscientious. Okay maybe not all but most.  

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, May 17, 2018 2:16 PM

JJFlyer
 
ygmodeler4

 I build for my own reasons, probably the same reasons as the majority of you on here. It's certainly not because of the welcoming crowd at the model meetings/LHS/contests though.

 

 

 

 

This is a bit off topic, but all I've seen are negatives about the clubs. are there any notable positives?

Thanks,

JJFlyer

 

Along with being a member of this forum, joining a club was the best move i have made in this hobby. While its nice to talk to people here, as we all know its a solitary hobby. Its nice to be able to actually meet other model builders in the flesh, see their work, here about new products and pick up ideas.

Of course, as with any group of people, it is made up of people of different sorts. Somtimes you get on with them, sometimes you don't. Thats life. I don't think model builders are any different to any other group of people.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, May 17, 2018 10:39 AM

JJFlyer

 

 
ygmodeler4

 I build for my own reasons, probably the same reasons as the majority of you on here. It's certainly not because of the welcoming crowd at the model meetings/LHS/contests though.

 

 

 

 

This is a bit off topic, but all I've seen are negatives about the clubs. are there any notable positives?

Thanks,

JJFlyer

 

Yes. I belong to the local IPMS & AMPS chapters in this area. The talent and skills of these guys is tremendous. And the vast majority of them are great guys who are more than happy to share their knowledge and techniques to help anybody and everybody to improve. Much better to see and ask these guys in person than to watch a video or the back and forth of these boards. Yes there are the grumpy old guys and cliques out there, but thankfully that has not been my experience.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    September, 2016
  • From: Albany, New York
Posted by ManCityFan on Thursday, May 17, 2018 10:21 AM

JJFlyer
 
ygmodeler4

 I build for my own reasons, probably the same reasons as the majority of you on here. It's certainly not because of the welcoming crowd at the model meetings/LHS/contests though.

 

 

 

 

This is a bit off topic, but all I've seen are negatives about the clubs. are there any notable positives?

Thanks,

JJFlyer

 

Clubs will be as good as their members, so some will be great, and others not so much.  I joined the local IPMS chapter in my area about six months ago, and although I am one of the youngest members (at age 54), they have been very welcoming.  The meetings are pretty loose agenda wise, and the talent/experience level is pretty high.  They have been very encouraging, and are more than happy to answer any questions I have.  I have a meeting tonight, and I am very much looking forward to it.

 

Dwayne or Dman or just D.  All comments are welcome on my builds. 

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Naples, FL
Posted by tempestjohnny on Thursday, May 17, 2018 9:17 AM

ygmodeler4

 

 
JJFlyer

 

 
ygmodeler4

 I build for my own reasons, probably the same reasons as the majority of you on here. It's certainly not because of the welcoming crowd at the model meetings/LHS/contests though.

 

 

 

 

This is a bit off topic, but all I've seen are negatives about the clubs. are there any notable positives?

Thanks,

JJFlyer

 

 

 

Sure there are plenty of positives: Seeing other models in person is a big one. The programs are good sometimes. Good deals can be had as well.

 

Every hobby or club or sport is going to have the jerks that can take the fun out of it. But the majority are good guys or girls. I've been here on this forum for almost 15 years. There have been some problems. But every "family" has spats now and then. I feel I have made real friends here. And I've only met one person in person.

John

 

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