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Millennials and Modeling

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  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Hatboro, PA
Posted by Justinryan215 on Thursday, February 07, 2019 8:32 PM

I was born in '78, and I love it!  I built aircraft in my younger years, got away from the hobby for a while, and when I came back the first time, I was into building cars (working in a bodyshop made painting the bodies easy, with access to industrial grade spray equipment....).  Then I got away from the hobby for a bit as I started a family.  

 

One day my little brother and I were reminiscing, and he told me how he used to love watching me building those planes, watching them come together....so I bought another airplane kit....and I've been back ever since.

 

I am working towards becoming assistant Scout Master in my kids' cub scout pack, and I hosted a model group build.  I (the pack, with money earned by selling popcorn) bought 25 snap tite A10 warthog models and 25 sprue nippers, and one Saturday afternoon, we met and built our kits together!  I've heard so much positive feedback, that I will be starting the Pack 17 model Club, where we will meet once a month to discuss our builds, show off what we have finished, and just chat about things.  I am even thinking we can show off our work at the monthly pack Meetings!

 

I am hopeful that I can introduce some new blood into the hobby through my scouts!

"...failure to do anything because someone else can do better makes us rather dull and lazy..."

Mortal as I am,I know that I am born for a day.  But when I follow at my pleasure the serried multitude of the stars in their circular course, my feet no longer touch the Earth...

 

  • Member since
    June, 2017
Posted by UnwaryPaladin on Wednesday, January 30, 2019 12:01 PM

German Armour
Hi, yes. In my area we have no hobby shops, except for one that is 3 1/2 hrs away. The price is a major factor in my purchase decisions. Dragon kits are too expensive and I am 18, so the older Tamiya shake & bake kits are my usual buys. Also at Regina in Saskatchewan where the hobby shop is located there are a Gundam club and a model club but too far for me to go for meetings. If model companies where to create reasonable kits under $40 like older tamiya then there would maybe be more interest. Bandai must be really smart to do what there doing. :)
 

 

Check out DragonUSA.com, they usually have some pretty good sales, sometimes 60% off. I picked up the 1/72 Hellcat and Sea Venom kits, didn't pay over $15 for either with their Black Friday Sale. 

  • Member since
    September, 2018
Posted by Overcast451 on Thursday, January 24, 2019 6:06 PM

Indeed, yesterday I was looking over some various YouTube videos on painting, etc - and found some from this young guy. 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8k6eLGwL0j-W9pK65QlXCg/videos

Kinda made me smile and think of our discussion here. Good to know it's still an interest. 

  • Member since
    December, 2018
Posted by Ted4321 on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 5:54 PM

Subscribe to the "latest acquisitions" thread.  You'll see this hobby ain't dyin'.

 

T e d

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: NYC, USA
Posted by waikong on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 4:33 PM
I have 2 kids in their 20's. One of them build Gundam and paints miniatures, so people are still interested. And yeah, they are into computers and video games also. But I don't see how that translates into 'lazy' or no patience. I happen to be in software development for the past 32+ years, and let me tell you that building a website, or coding, or digital photo manipulation, or video game level building - all of those takes skills and patience. A lot of patience.
  • Member since
    September, 2018
Posted by Overcast451 on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 10:23 AM

redraider56

 

 
GreySnake
 
I think another problem is there are just so many different things competing for everyone’s attention right now. Between video games, streaming services, social media, work and family it seems life is more chaotic then even twenty years ago.
  

 

 

 

My thoughts in a nutshell.  Looking at all the technological advances in the last 30 years in terms of computers, video games, smart phones, etc, I think unless you had friends or parents or something that were modeling, your probably weren't exposed much to it.  At least not as much as someone say 30-40 years ago was. 

 

For me, if it weren't for a Christmas gift from my uncle one years (1/48 Revell Memphis Belle) O'm not sure Iwould've gotten into this hobby.  But since building that with my Dad when I was 7 or 8, it sunk it's teeth into me.  I'm in the same boat as some other people.  I'm 28 and its been several years since I've done anything model related.  It's been almost 6 years since I graduated college and starting out life took priority but I feel like I've finally gotten the time to get back into it.  My thought is there's probably more people out there that put it on hold for awhile but just havn't gotten the opportunity to start it up again.

 

 

Yep, that's probably right. I'm just about to turn 47 - and I've just gotten back into it. Heck, I wasn't even aware that 'IPMS' existed. Yesterday I looked into it shortly but wasn't sure I wanted to pay a membership fee. Although from what I'm reading - it sounds like it might be worth looking into. 

But over the weekend both of my 'millenial' kids stopped to see what I was doing and positively commented on it. 

When I went to a hobby store with a co-worker (Who's maybe GenY, I supppose) - there seemed like an age mix there. Most of the older guys were mulling around near me in the plastic ship/plane/car model areas, but man of the younger ones were over by the fantasy miniatures (what my co-worker does) and the RC area. A lot of RC stuff is similar in many ways to our hobby.

  • Member since
    April, 2010
  • From: Green Bay, WI
Posted by redraider56 on Wednesday, January 09, 2019 12:26 PM

GreySnake
 
I think another problem is there are just so many different things competing for everyone’s attention right now. Between video games, streaming services, social media, work and family it seems life is more chaotic then even twenty years ago.
  

 

My thoughts in a nutshell.  Looking at all the technological advances in the last 30 years in terms of computers, video games, smart phones, etc, I think unless you had friends or parents or something that were modeling, your probably weren't exposed much to it.  At least not as much as someone say 30-40 years ago was. 

 

For me, if it weren't for a Christmas gift from my uncle one years (1/48 Revell Memphis Belle) O'm not sure Iwould've gotten into this hobby.  But since building that with my Dad when I was 7 or 8, it sunk it's teeth into me.  I'm in the same boat as some other people.  I'm 28 and its been several years since I've done anything model related.  It's been almost 6 years since I graduated college and starting out life took priority but I feel like I've finally gotten the time to get back into it.  My thought is there's probably more people out there that put it on hold for awhile but just havn't gotten the opportunity to start it up again.

-Matt

On The Bench: 1/48 Monogram B-17G "Man-O-War II"

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2011
  • From: AZ,USA
Posted by GreySnake on Wednesday, January 09, 2019 11:38 AM
Just my two cents
I was born in 1988 so that makes me a millennial. I got into the hobby thanks to my father and it’s been my preferred hobby mostly since I was nine years old. Gundam kits seem to be pretty popular with my generation since a lot of us grew up watching the show in the mid 90’s. My girlfriend is big into building the models and they are really popular with the 23 to 30 crowd it seems right now. My nearest LHS has a hard time keeping the models in stock and it’s the main seller.
 
I think another problem is there are just so many different things competing for everyone’s attention right now. Between video games, streaming services, social media, work and family it seems life is more chaotic then even twenty years ago.
 
As for me I’m trying to get back into the hobby after being out of it for four years due to personal stuff. It’s nice to actually sit down to something else other then look at a screen. I’m not worried about the hobby dying it’s going to survive.
  • Member since
    September, 2018
Posted by Darkhorse on Sunday, December 02, 2018 11:47 AM

I’m in the coin collecting industry, and the hobby has had similar concerns about getting younger people participating. I think coin collecting has some greater challenges due to the fact that the business tends to revolve around the highest value rarities. It’s definitely a hobby dominated by, let’s face it, the older white male of means. A millennial is going to have a tough time justifying the cost of a nice rare coin worth a couple of thousand dollars, let alone a more higher end rarity worth tens of thousands of dollars... and just forget about the ultra rarities worth millions.

 More attention needs to be paid to the low end of the hobby if it is to grow, and I see that low end millennial collector is very active on social media, particularly Instagram. I’ve urged my bosses to capitalize on it.

 I’ve seen similar social media activity, if not more active activity, when it comes to modeling. There’s lots of popular modeling accounts on Instagram, and some great YouTube channels by younger people giving tutorials, and I think that’s great. I’m not sure what the best approach is to grow the hobby from this “seed” but there’s definitely something enthusiastic there.

There’s also modeling and coin forums on Reddit that are very active, but that place scares me and I avoid it.

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, November 29, 2018 6:36 AM

TankerEasy

 

 
Bish

 

 
Wilbur Wright

As far as age demographics I believe the hobby is much healthier in Europe and Japan. This is how MIG, AK,  Takom, Meng can make their margins.

I'm 58, and I don't know a single millenial that models outside of the occasional kid that goes to MIT.

You have 3 years olds that have iPads, that have to make a "date" to play.  It's a differnet world.

You want to talk about a hobby in trouble, try stamp collecting.  I'm considered one of the babies at 58.  No one is coming to replenish when the old guard die off.  Most of my friends in that hobby are well into their 80's, if not 90's.

 

 

 

It does seem very healthy over here judging by the numbers who attend the shows. And from what i have seen, the ages range from 20's all the way up. Even in the model club i belong to where we get between 10 and 20 attending each meeting, there are a couple of guys in their early 30's. I think the hobby is safe for a few years to come, my copncern would be in 20 to 30 years, will there be enough people still doing it to make it viable.

 

 

 

 

It does appear the in the UK and Europe theres alot more people still enjoying the hobby.  Its certainly died way down in the U.S., BUT i do feel its coming back around and more people are getting back into it.  My step is almost 5, and he seems really inetrested in what im doing when im at the bench, so hopefully when he gets a bit older i can get him into building with me, but who knows.....Huh?

 

I only joined a club and started going to shows in 2014, so i can't really say if the hobby slowed down over here. I am not one of those who built in my teens then stopped for 20 or 30 years, i have been modelling almost none stop since i was 9. I notice a lot of new members here are coming back into it after a long break, but i have not noticed that so much in the UK. A lot of the people i know seem to be similar to me. So that may well explain the growth of it in the US. But lets home we can bring more youngsters into it.

'I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so'

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/72nd Ju 188A

                      Fine Molds 1/72nd Me 410

  • Member since
    June, 2018
Posted by TankerEasy on Thursday, November 29, 2018 6:27 AM

Bish

 

 
Wilbur Wright

As far as age demographics I believe the hobby is much healthier in Europe and Japan. This is how MIG, AK,  Takom, Meng can make their margins.

I'm 58, and I don't know a single millenial that models outside of the occasional kid that goes to MIT.

You have 3 years olds that have iPads, that have to make a "date" to play.  It's a differnet world.

You want to talk about a hobby in trouble, try stamp collecting.  I'm considered one of the babies at 58.  No one is coming to replenish when the old guard die off.  Most of my friends in that hobby are well into their 80's, if not 90's.

 

 

 

It does seem very healthy over here judging by the numbers who attend the shows. And from what i have seen, the ages range from 20's all the way up. Even in the model club i belong to where we get between 10 and 20 attending each meeting, there are a couple of guys in their early 30's. I think the hobby is safe for a few years to come, my copncern would be in 20 to 30 years, will there be enough people still doing it to make it viable.

 

 

It does appear the in the UK and Europe theres alot more people still enjoying the hobby.  Its certainly died way down in the U.S., BUT i do feel its coming back around and more people are getting back into it.  My step is almost 5, and he seems really inetrested in what im doing when im at the bench, so hopefully when he gets a bit older i can get him into building with me, but who knows.....Huh?

Air Force vet (2006-2012)

PC gamer, rig specs: i7-7700K (overclocked), MSI GTX 1080 gpu, 16 gigs G.skill Trident Z ram, Phanteks case with purdy lights CoolCool

Recently completed: 1:16 Dragon figure (for now)

On the bench: 1:48 Academy F-4C Phantom II "Scat 27, Robin Olds' aircraft"

 

 

 

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by PFJN on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 1:38 PM

Hi,

This thread has gotten me thinking.  I seem to recal that when I was in high school (or there abouts (1977-1981) I think I could buy a 1/48 scale Revell or Monogram plane for about $5.25 at my local hobby store.  The only reason that I recall that was that I used to categorize models as whether they were $3-3.50 models or whether they were the $5.25 ones.

Anyway, if I did the math right, $5.25 inflated to today's money assuming about 3.5% increase per year would equal about $ 18.75 to 21.50 or so.

Looking at eBay I see several 1/48 scale Revell SBD Dauntless modles going for about $18.90 to about $22.00, so that seems not unreasonable to me Smile.

PF

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Currently in the Dallas area
Posted by modelcrazy on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 11:04 AM

I hear all the time how high prices are today compared years ago. How gas, homes, cars were so much less etc. I was only making $3 an hour in the late 70's so it's all realitive.

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/72 Revell Eurofighter Typhoon Twin Seater
1/72 Airfix BV-141
1/48 Tamiya Mk.1 Swordfish
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales

In Que

1/72 Airfix Dakota Mk. IV

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 10:51 AM

German Armour
Hi, yes. In my area we have no hobby shops, except for one that is 3 1/2 hrs away. The price is a major factor in my purchase decisions. Dragon kits are too expensive and I am 18, so the older Tamiya shake & bake kits are my usual buys. Also at Regina in Saskatchewan where the hobby shop is located there are a Gundam club and a model club but too far for me to go for meetings. If model companies where to create reasonable kits under $40 like older tamiya then there would maybe be more interest. Bandai must be really smart to do what there doing. :)
 

Well, back in the late '80s - early '90s when I was in high school and college and working a series of krappy jobs I had to scrimp and save to pick up Tamiya and Dragon kits too. It hasn't changed all that much. Wink

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    October, 2018
Posted by Codeman on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 10:50 AM

laskdjn

I was born in 1982.  That puts me at about either the trail end of Gen X or the beginning edge of Millenials, depending on how you look at it.  I really don't consider myself a Millenial, though, because I actually don't mind hard work, and can deal without immediate gratification... 

However, unlike Clemens, one of my co-workers also builds, though.  But him and I are the only ones I know.

 

 

Same here. I was born in ’83. I get upset when people try to pool me in with the millennials. I love hard work, but my job is really stressful. I grew up modeling and got out of it in my late teens only to return now for the relaxaction that it brings. I love focusing on the small details and taking my time to make something awesome out of a Bunch of plastic pieces. Here in Portland we have a few LHSs but they are expensive. If the younger people dont understand the importance of shopping small and local then it will only be reserved for the online world

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 10:41 AM

Wilbur Wright

As far as age demographics I believe the hobby is much healthier in Europe and Japan. This is how MIG, AK,  Takom, Meng can make their margins.

I'm 58, and I don't know a single millenial that models outside of the occasional kid that goes to MIT.

You have 3 years olds that have iPads, that have to make a "date" to play.  It's a differnet world.

You want to talk about a hobby in trouble, try stamp collecting.  I'm considered one of the babies at 58.  No one is coming to replenish when the old guard die off.  Most of my friends in that hobby are well into their 80's, if not 90's.

 

It does seem very healthy over here judging by the numbers who attend the shows. And from what i have seen, the ages range from 20's all the way up. Even in the model club i belong to where we get between 10 and 20 attending each meeting, there are a couple of guys in their early 30's. I think the hobby is safe for a few years to come, my copncern would be in 20 to 30 years, will there be enough people still doing it to make it viable.

'I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so'

On the bench: Hasegawa 1/72nd Ju 188A

                      Fine Molds 1/72nd Me 410

  • Member since
    February, 2016
  • From: Ice coated north 40 saskatchewan
Posted by German Armour on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 10:20 AM
Hi, yes. In my area we have no hobby shops, except for one that is 3 1/2 hrs away. The price is a major factor in my purchase decisions. Dragon kits are too expensive and I am 18, so the older Tamiya shake & bake kits are my usual buys. Also at Regina in Saskatchewan where the hobby shop is located there are a Gundam club and a model club but too far for me to go for meetings. If model companies where to create reasonable kits under $40 like older tamiya then there would maybe be more interest. Bandai must be really smart to do what there doing. :)

 Never give up, never quit, never stop modelling.Idea

 

  • Member since
    June, 2018
Posted by TankerEasy on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 8:11 AM

A buddy of mine one day saw me browsing a hobby site, without skipping a beat he says "plastic models are still a thing?".. He quite literally thought they just stopped making them years ago and that’s why he hadn’t seen any in a long time. It doesn’t help my area has zero LHS and were left with Hobby Lobby's crap selection

Air Force vet (2006-2012)

PC gamer, rig specs: i7-7700K (overclocked), MSI GTX 1080 gpu, 16 gigs G.skill Trident Z ram, Phanteks case with purdy lights CoolCool

Recently completed: 1:16 Dragon figure (for now)

On the bench: 1:48 Academy F-4C Phantom II "Scat 27, Robin Olds' aircraft"

 

 

 

  • Member since
    October, 2018
Posted by PGBolt on Monday, November 26, 2018 2:15 PM

bluenote

I agree with you regarding the many different entertainment options available to millennials, but I don't believe that price is part of the problem.  I'm 43, and I remember the average AMT/Ertl/MPC car kit as being around $10 in the mid-late eighties.  With inflation, a car kit costing around $30 seems about right.  Paint is about $4.  

Yeah, maybe I'm off about the price thing. Still, there are a lot of other things, presumably mor trendy, competing for their trust fund money.
 
 
bluenote
I really think if models were more readily available then they may be more popular with younger people.  
Demand drives supply, generally speaking.
 
I do remember in my yout', that all kinds of stores had hobby sections, including JCPenney, Monkey Ward, TG&Y, Western Auto, even some pharmacies.
  • Member since
    June, 2014
Posted by bluenote on Monday, November 26, 2018 2:02 PM

PGBolt

As some other respondents have commented, I believe that the current cost of plastic modeling keeps away millenials, among others. In the case of millenials, there is heavy competition for their bucks: E-Cigs, live shows, IoT, latest iPhone, "vintage" clothing that was made last week in China, bad tattoos, pricey everything-free food, etc. I think the closest thing to modeling that attracts millenials on a wide scale is drones, which used to be called RC helicopters. Wink

At 53, I find myself gagging on the price of new kits. A run-of-the-mill AMT 1/25 car kit typically retails for $30 at the carft store usual suspects. At the risk of going all Abe Simpson, modeling was much more accessible (cost-wise) "back in my day".

The availability and convenience of online shopping has certainly cut into the LHS population. In my area (RDU) there are a few really good independent LHSs, but even those are generally focused on RC and/or gaming. I suspect that the margins on those are higher than plastic kits. The LHS issue is a whole other issue for discussion.

 

 
I agree with you regarding the many different entertainment options available to millennials, but I don't believe that price is part of the problem.  I'm 43, and I remember the average AMT/Ertl/MPC car kit as being around $10 in the mid-late eighties.  With inflation, a car kit costing around $30 seems about right.  Paint is about $4.  
 
If you consider that the average new video game is about $60-$70, then a $30 car kit doesn't seem to be unreasonable, considering the hours it would take to build a car kit.
 
I really think the main problem is that kits are simply nowhere to be found.  They are not in most major toy stores.  They are not in the local convenience store (when I was a kid most of my local convenience stores had a modest selection of kits with the basic testor's paint display).  The major department stores (Walmart, Target, etc) do not carry them.  Local hobby shops are few and far between.  My local mall used to have a "Hobby Hut" and us kids were in there all the time.  I suppose in the US there is Hobby Lobby though.
 
I really think if models were more readily available then they may be more popular with younger people.  
 
 
  • Member since
    October, 2018
Posted by PGBolt on Monday, November 26, 2018 12:37 PM

As some other respondents have commented, I believe that the current cost of plastic modeling keeps away millenials, among others. In the case of millenials, there is heavy competition for their bucks: E-Cigs, live shows, IoT, latest iPhone, "vintage" clothing that was made last week in China, bad tattoos, pricey everything-free food, etc. I think the closest thing to modeling that attracts millenials on a wide scale is drones, which used to be called RC helicopters. Wink

At 53, I find myself gagging on the price of new kits. A run-of-the-mill AMT 1/25 car kit typically retails for $30 at the carft store usual suspects. At the risk of going all Abe Simpson, modeling was much more accessible (cost-wise) "back in my day".

The availability and convenience of online shopping has certainly cut into the LHS population. In my area (RDU) there are a few really good independent LHSs, but even those are generally focused on RC and/or gaming. I suspect that the margins on those are higher than plastic kits. The LHS issue is a whole other issue for discussion.

  • Member since
    June, 2018
Posted by TankerEasy on Monday, November 26, 2018 12:20 PM

From what I see, and this is from bumming around some of the groups on Facebook, it appears that the hobby is making a comeback in the United States.  I'm seeing more and more individuals in their early to mid 30's getting back into it.  Don’t lose faith!  us youngens appreciate the patience required to get through some of these kits Cool

Air Force vet (2006-2012)

PC gamer, rig specs: i7-7700K (overclocked), MSI GTX 1080 gpu, 16 gigs G.skill Trident Z ram, Phanteks case with purdy lights CoolCool

Recently completed: 1:16 Dragon figure (for now)

On the bench: 1:48 Academy F-4C Phantom II "Scat 27, Robin Olds' aircraft"

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2006
  • From: Boston
Posted by Wilbur Wright on Wednesday, November 21, 2018 2:20 PM

As far as age demographics I believe the hobby is much healthier in Europe and Japan. This is how MIG, AK,  Takom, Meng can make their margins.

I'm 58, and I don't know a single millenial that models outside of the occasional kid that goes to MIT.

You have 3 years olds that have iPads, that have to make a "date" to play.  It's a differnet world.

You want to talk about a hobby in trouble, try stamp collecting.  I'm considered one of the babies at 58.  No one is coming to replenish when the old guard die off.  Most of my friends in that hobby are well into their 80's, if not 90's.

  • Member since
    May, 2016
Posted by B-36Andy on Tuesday, November 20, 2018 7:12 PM

I think I lean toward the Noahs ark generation. My dad was a 30s flyer and WWII dive bomber pilot. I grew up at Carswell AFB and Dallas NAS.

My little grand daughter was born in 2014 and I have no idea what her gerneration is called. This kid loves airplanes and is building little wooden children's kits with me. She has pobably 50 metal planes of various sizes and each is special. Her favorite is a beat up old Lindberg Cutlass that she takes to be every night.

I think she will be a model builder!

  • Member since
    October, 2018
Posted by Jimd0586 on Wednesday, November 14, 2018 2:10 PM

This is a good question. I was born in 1986, so technically I am a millennial... I think Hmm

 

For me, modelling started because of my fascination with military history. I am a gung-ho american patriot at heart, though I kick myself for never taking the leap and going through OCS and serving after college. That aside, it's my interest in flying and WWII history that got me into it.

With so many distractions between TV, video games, and social media, it will be a hard sell. I think kits like the P-51D snap kit would help, make the building process as easy as possible (no glue, etc). That's step one. Step two is somehow make it cool... package it. Maybe pair a new video game with a model, have some kind of competition to get those kids playing video games to pair it with a built model somehow... I don't know, make it a tool in the game or have a contest for best built models get money off in game purchases... no clue.

Ultimately, my generation likes instant gratification. Even our movies are all action and no story anymore. I don't think we are a dumb or boring generation, just the product of continual marketing that has cut to the chase more and more over the years to the point that we now all expect immediate results/gratification/etc/

 

- Jim

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, October 26, 2018 1:43 PM

falconmod

Yes it's kinda humbling when we become our parents isn't it!

 

Wink

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September, 2011
  • From: Milaca, Minnesota
Posted by falconmod on Friday, October 26, 2018 12:08 PM

Yes it's kinda humbling when we become our parents isn't it!

On the Bench: 1/72 Ki-67, 1/48 Airfix P-51D

1/72 LS Dinah III, 1/72 Hasegawa T-33A

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, October 26, 2018 11:48 AM

Well as some people have pointed out above growing up a Gen-Xer the Boomers kept calling us lazy, shiftless, cynical, and more interested in playing video games than getting ahead. The same thing older people keep throwing at the Millenials... 

I think every generation makes the same accusations at the young guys and gals. 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    September, 2011
  • From: Milaca, Minnesota
Posted by falconmod on Friday, October 26, 2018 11:25 AM

TankerEasy

 

Per the internets, millennials start in 1984, making me part of that group (born in 88').  I was modeling as a kid because my dad did, and in turn i got into it.  I will admit I just got back into it earlier this year, but none the less I love it.  I can see reading through some of the replies that there’s a big misconception of those of us classified as "millennials"..  Keep in mind folks, its baby boomers and gen x'ers that created millennials due to poor parenting... so some of you might wanna take a long hard look at your own generation for the crap shoot we’ve ended up with, and remember were not all bad Whistling WinkCool

 

*not trying to offend anyone, but when my age group gets targeted like it does on the regular, i feel it’s necessary to defend it, the generations created this monster lol**

Valid statement and Yes I think we BB  are guilty as charged!

 

On the Bench: 1/72 Ki-67, 1/48 Airfix P-51D

1/72 LS Dinah III, 1/72 Hasegawa T-33A

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