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Staying focused

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  • Member since
    October, 2003
  • From: Crest Hill, Il. U.S.A.
Staying focused
Posted by masonme2 on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 1:54 PM

I'm wondering how many others have the same problem as I do? It seems like I buy a new kit and eagerly look foreward to getting started on it and then the first serious snag I run into I set it aside. It might sit for a day or two and sometimes longer and then I spot another kit that catches my eye and the cycle starts again! Am I the only one who suffers from this or is it more widespread than I thought? It can be anything from a bad first paint job to parts needing filling/sanding or any of a thousand things that happen when one builds models.

"Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock"   Will Rogers

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by Keyda81 on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 2:07 PM

I have almost the same issue, but instead of starting another kit the current build just sits there collecting dust.  It usually happens when I get the point of filling and sanding seams.  I dread that part.  So when I get to it, I just don't want to do it, and I set the model down.  Then eventually I'm bored enough to go and work on it cause I have nothing else to do at the time, lol. 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 2:16 PM

Keyda81
I have almost the same issue, but instead of starting another kit the current build just sits there collecting dust

Me too.

In my case, I think it goes to my perfectionism. An innocent-sounding yet debilitating thing. Often afraid to move forward because I'm afraid I will mess something up. Bang Head

-Greg

  • Member since
    October, 2016
  • From: Somewhere in Ohio...
Posted by DasBeav on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 2:24 PM

Masking "Glass"...Instant Procrastination. Please don't mention buying masks, I am frugal.

 Sooner Born...Buckeye Bred.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 2:53 PM
I'm more obsessive,I will try to hard to battle thru,even if I'm not quite enjoying it.After getting thru some non fulfilling parts,it usually comes together and becomes more satisfying.Sometimes however it gets worse and then it is put aside for the future or worse case trashed.But I usually am determined to persevere and finish.

  • Member since
    October, 2003
  • From: Crest Hill, Il. U.S.A.
Posted by masonme2 on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 3:04 PM
I haven't been able to trash a kit yet even though I know it may be beyond saving!

"Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock"   Will Rogers

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by Keyda81 on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 3:50 PM

Greg

 

 
Keyda81
I have almost the same issue, but instead of starting another kit the current build just sits there collecting dust

 

Me too.

In my case, I think it goes to my perfectionism. An innocent-sounding yet debilitating thing. Often afraid to move forward because I'm afraid I will mess something up. Bang Head

 

That's how I am about starting a kit that I know is going to be a bit of a challenge, like replicating W7, lol.  I will start that this winter though, just one to get one more aftermarket bit for it.  I have a P-61 just sitting there in the box, I've heard of the issues, and I'm a bit worried I don't have the skills to handle it!

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 4:12 PM

Couple glasses of liquid courage has led to many successful experiments and a few failures.  ;)

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 4:22 PM

Most of the time I work on several kits  rotating as I  go along. Doesn’t give you time to loose interest .

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    July, 2008
  • From: Vancouver, the "wet coast"
Posted by castelnuovo on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 4:47 PM

Simmilar to Keyda. I don't start another kit, just do something else, read or play simple video games online. At some piont on I'll just get back to it and continue building. No rush.

fox
  • Member since
    January, 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 5:01 PM

I do what PJ does. I work on 4 or 5 kits at the same time. To let the glue dry, work on another one. To let the paint dry, work on another. It's worked for me for years.

Jim  Captain

 Main WIP: 

   On the Bench:  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 70% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 5:11 PM

Keyda81
That's how I am about starting a kit that I know is going to be a bit of a challenge, like replicating W7, lol. I will start that this winter though, just one to get one more aftermarket bit for it. I have a P-61 just sitting there in the box, I've heard of the issues, and I'm a bit worried I don't have the skills to handle it! Add

I've watched lots of your projects, and haven't seen one get the better of you yet.

You'll do great!

-Greg

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 5:25 PM

castelnuovo

At some piont on I'll just get back to it and continue building. No rush.

 

LOL I used to say the same thing as a younger guy but as the years close in I need to bring down the stash count. Tongue Tied 

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Currently in the Dallas area
Posted by modelcrazy on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 5:29 PM

DasBeav

Masking "Glass"...Instant Procrastination. Please don't mention buying masks, I am frugal.

 

Ditto

And I like Japanese AC the most. Their canopies are a nightmare for me.
Beav, have you tried "liquid mask". Not perfect but it helps, particularly on 1/72 and smaller.

The other issue for me is PE, especially on ships. I can just take so much of the same thing before I have to put it aside for a little while (in one case, over 1 1/2 years). I do work on more than one kit at a time but over three and I can't stay focused.

Keyda, you're more than ready the the P-61.

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/48 Tamiya Mk.1 Swordfish
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales
1/200 AMT Saturn V

In Que

Secret Santa gifts will move to the top after Christmas.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 6:28 PM

Greg
 Often afraid to move forward because I'm afraid I will mess something up. Bang Head
 

Laughing. this is my greatest enemy.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 6:30 PM

fox

I do what PJ does. I work on 4 or 5 kits at the same time. To let the glue dry, work on another one. To let the paint dry, work on another. It's worked for me for years.

Jim  Captain

 

Smiling. Maybe someday I will get there.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Wednesday, October 03, 2018 10:13 PM

Ya know, I used to dread getting into a build with some intricate features and enhanced details. Some of the issues might be parts with fit problems, like steps between surfaces, or major components like wing to fuselage fit. I was disappointed with results of filing, sanding and excessive fillers needed.

One bug a boo was when the fuselage seams had warps and didn't line up well. Then I learned about the different methods of correcting that by using plastic tabs, glued under the higher side seam and protruding about 1/8 to 1/4 inch. Let the glue dry over night to ensure strength, then prod the lower seam over the tab on the opposite side. It works wonders for not having to grind, file and fill.

I'm also able to use plastic stock, like strips or streched sprue, in place of fillers by glueing it in place and when dried it's easily sanded smooth. It also makes for a much stronger joint than a filler could.

All of this I learned from other modelers, here on the Forums. Much of whatever advancements I've made in my building, I owe to the other members sharing their knowledge here at FSM. Thanks all, I enjoy the hobby all the more now.

Patrick 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, October 04, 2018 8:36 AM

People around here refer to the Shelf of Doom, the place where you put those unfinished kits while you work on something else.  In addition to the reasons for doing that folks have already mentioned, the clubs in my area often have little challenge contests, for building models with some common factor.  I often set aside my current project to work on something for the challenge contest.

My shelves of doom are full now.  They consist of three six foot long shelves.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2016
Posted by Keyda81 on Friday, October 05, 2018 8:42 AM

Don Stauffer

People around here refer to the Shelf of Doom, the place where you put those unfinished kits while you work on something else.  In addition to the reasons for doing that folks have already mentioned, the clubs in my area often have little challenge contests, for building models with some common factor.  I often set aside my current project to work on something for the challenge contest.

My shelves of doom are full now.  They consist of three six foot long shelves.

 

 

That would drive me absolutely nuts, lol.  I can't stand unfinished projects.  Once I start something I have to keep at it until I finish it.  Hubby is the opposite.  He starts all kinds of projects, and then they sit there unfinished for years.  Drives me insane, cause he's got stuff sitting around taking up precious space in the garage/shed that he will not touch for a LONG time.  I'm talking years.  My current build may sit for a little while, but at most a month or two, then I'll get back to it.  It happens more in the summer time when it's nice out and there are things to do outside. 

  • Member since
    December, 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Friday, October 05, 2018 9:19 AM

I am the same as Tojo, when i hit a snag i push on through. Depending on the subject and how much interest i have in it will determine how much effort i put in to get it right. I have never trashed a kit yet, though i came close with a MiG a few months back. And the only kits on my shelf of doom had been finished but just awating a diorama, but i have that down to one.

Most of the time i do one kit at a time. But as i build mainly diorama's, that means there are a lot of different elements which keeps the build interesting and also give me somthing else to work on when i need to set the kit ashide to dry.

'I am a Norfolk man, and i glory in being so'

  • Member since
    December, 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Friday, October 05, 2018 10:31 AM

 I started the habit of building multiple builds at one time.  Its fine until I hit the same snag on all the builds at the same time.  Then its off to build an RC airplane or take up another hobby for a while.  

Another problem is not keeping notes on where I leave off on one build compared to another and keeping parts organized. I now have an american aircraft carrier finished with German handrails and a German cruiser with US 3 bar handrails.  

But its only a hobby, nothing to get worried over.  

  • Member since
    July, 2016
  • From: Malvern, PA
Posted by WillysMB on Friday, October 05, 2018 12:01 PM

On both models and the cars I restore, when I run into a snag I find myself backing away and then spending some time thinking about what to do to handle the snag. Sometimes that involves posting on a forum for additional thoughts. Over time I've actually come to really enjoy the thinking and visualizing time. I've never stopped something completely and started something else, which I think came from my dad's admonitions as a boy.

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, October 05, 2018 12:19 PM

A great advantage to juggling multiple projects at once---besides keeping interest up. By working on 'small bits' of projects at a time, you still have the satisfaction of getting work done, and continually making progress.

Plus, by focusing on the 'small picture' instead of the 'big' one, you're not put off by the whole weight or complexity of a project---and thoughts of all you'll have to slog through to reach the finish. Before you know it you're 3/4 of the way to the finish, and natural momentum kicks in.

Works nearly every time.

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."

 

"

  • Member since
    November, 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Friday, October 05, 2018 12:23 PM

Scott

look at my ESCI BMW R75 WIP. I use small Gerber plastic containers to store parts. I do the same thing when working on multiple kits to keep parts in check.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

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