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Wouldn't it be cool to see what Tamiya could do with an American muscle car?

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  • Member since
    June 2008
Posted by lewbud on Thursday, January 30, 2020 3:53 AM

I saw this kit after a friend tagged me in a comment about it on Facebook.  I have to admit that this came from way out in left field, like the corner where the foul line, home run post, and fence meet on the ground. I would have thought that they would have done another GT3 car rather than a US spec GT4 racer (the Mustang isn't campained in Europe, whereas the Camaro is). Perhaps if sales are good enough, they'll do the Camaro as well(and hopefully the DTM Crossbow).

As to what UPSJuan was saying about being willing to pay a premium price for a new tool muscle car kit. You and others may be willing to drop 50-60+ bucks on a new muscle car, but the majority of car builders aren't for many reasons. Also the market wouldn't bear it. Lets say Tamiya came out with a 1970 Boss 429 Mustang, and like modern Tamiya stuff it would be beautiful. However, the price point is 55.00. Revell/Germany decides it's time to dust off it's still good but by modern standards, not great 1970 Boss 429. It's price point is 30.00. Which do you think people are going to buy. If you're thinking that can't happen, you're wrong. A number of years back, Trumpeter decided it was going to come out with a modern, recessed panel lines, new tool 1/48 C-47. Monogram decided to re-release it's ancient, but still good 1/48 C-47. The Trumpy kit retailed at 99.00, the Monogram 45.00. I saw one Trumpy C-47 in my LHS at the time, and have never seen one again.  Another problem with the car model market is that it can really only sustain one manufacturer making a certain model, the exception being the Corvette, but even that has been taken over by Revell/Monogram now (AMT and Revell/Monogram both make Vettes up to C6, but AMT did not make a C7).  AMT/MPC are great for nostalgia reasons, but their molds are old and tired for their more popular kits.  Right now the best muscle car molds are the Revell/Monogram and will be unless Moebius decides to go there.  Another problem is that there is no real entry level car kits for beginners that are priced as such. I build 1/72 aircraft and I would have no problem recommending Hobby Boss's easy build kits or Airfix's line of 1/72 WWII fighters. At 10-15 bucks, a parent can take a risk on a kid getting frustrated or bored and not finishing a kit. There is no low buck option in the car world. The snap togethers are just as expensive as the glue kits, and sometimes more frustrating. I was at my lhs years ago and Tamiya had just came out with their Ferrari 360.  I was watching as this 9-10 year old boy fell in love with the car (what kid wouldn't). I knew it would be a difficult kit for a first timer and I asked the mom if it was his first kit. She said it was. I explained to her that I would have some difficulty with that kit and I had been building cars for many years and it was probably best if he started with one of the Revellogram or AMT/MPC offerings. She thanked me as I showed her where they were and left them to it.  Tamiya's niche is that it is for the more experienced modeler, whereas Revell has to make a kit that is simple enough for a beginner to get through relatively unscathed and still hold the more advanced modeler's attention. Outside of it's C6, I don't think AMT/MPC has done a new tool car in at least a decade maybe longer. The good news is that you have a relatively cheap canvas to hone your skills on. Look at the engine that Mustang89 did. You can build the same skills over time. If you think detail is soft on the interior? Get your knives out and learn how to scribe. Buy aor make a set of punches for dials and window cranks.  You think that the detail is soft on the chassis? There are outfits that provide small enough nuts and bolts to add that detail. You don't like the springs or shocks? You can build your own. There is enough knowledge here and elswhere on the web to get you where you want to be as a builder, not just as an assembler.  This is just my opinion of where the car model hobby is at, your mileage may vary.

Buddy- Those who say there are no stupid questions have never worked in customer service.

  • Member since
    February 2016
  • From: Ice coated north 40 saskatchewan
Posted by German Armour on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 11:32 PM

Yes Nice!

 Never give up, never quit, never stop modelling.Idea

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 10:25 PM

I saw this too!  Very excited.  I will defintly buy this one - saw a price of $54 somewhere.  I need an extra set of wheels - those are the same wheels I have on my Boss 302 Laguna Seca.  The standard Boss 302 kit from revell has the correct wheels, but I want to do my car - the Laguna Seca edition.

Anyhow - everyone buy these up and maybe Mr Tamiya will build more American race cars.

 

Thanks,

John

Ain't no reason to hang my head, I could wake up in the mornin' dead 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Nashua, NH
Posted by Mr Mike on Wednesday, January 29, 2020 7:44 AM

I happen to see this on my Facebook page this morning.  Tamiya is releasing a Ford Mustang GT4 kit.

"That's Spenser with an "S", like the poet." Robert Urich Spenser For Hire 1985

Classic Plastic Model Club 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Lamarque,Texas
Posted by uspsjuan on Tuesday, January 28, 2020 7:36 AM
Getting back to the root discussion. The level of detail in Most of the muscle car kits is lacking. While the body is the correct shape and looks fine. The rest of the car is a complete let down. Engine bay detail is lacking at best. If the car had a full frame, then give me a full separate frame with a suspension that looks like a suspension. It doesn't have to be workable, just be acceptably accurate. On to the interior, Can we sharpen up the detail in there. If they can make an aircraft interior with accurate sharp detail then why not an auto? I would happily pay a premium price for a muscle car made with todays manufacturing standards.
  • Member since
    April 2016
Posted by GlennH on Saturday, January 25, 2020 3:18 PM
I see the detail on that and and just have to shake my head in disbelief again. Here I am paused in an APC build after launching two clear lenses off into earth orbit and wondering how I am going glue these and the blackout lights on without doing the same. Luckily on these two clear lenses they were supposed to be painted anyway so I can make do with something else.

A number Army Viet Nam scans from hundreds yet to be done:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/southwestdreams/albums/72157621855914355

Have had the great fortune to be on every side of the howitzers.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Thursday, December 19, 2019 12:22 PM
That all depends, most manufacturers work on a 5 year body style. Sometimes if it had lackluster sales, they will end the body style a little early, but if it was popular, they keep it in play for longer. For instance, I drive Subaru Outbacks. They changed the body style in like 2005 from the older version. It was not widely accepted and a totally redesigned body style was introduced in 2010. It's remained virtually unchanged since then. The previous body style was used for around 10 years as well. Shortly after the '05 body style was introduced, someone offered me some crazy money for my '03 in late 2009. I took it into the dealership for routine maintenance and to see what it was worth and they offered me more money than the crazy guy offered me. Then I got my 2010 and loved it even more.
  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Thursday, December 19, 2019 9:41 AM

Hi Rob;

       The real point I must make is that nowadays , you almost cannot tell one model year from another. So,why bother?

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Wednesday, December 18, 2019 1:00 PM

uspsjuan
That might have been before the bean counters found out they could make a few extra dollars from the model manufactures for using their cars. Honestly, how much could the auto makers be getting for those rights? Do they not realize that if they forgo that money, the cost of kits goes down and more kids might try building them and thusly brand loyalty is born. Next thing you know is that kid is buying a new car because that's what he built as a kid!
 

Back in the day, the model companies also provided those pre-built promo car models for dealerships and banks that provided car loans. They worked hand in hand with the car designers to get their new cars into the public view.

Promo models are a thing of the past and model makers no longer retool this model year to update it to next model year like in the past.

https://www.hemmings.com/blog/article/the-lost-art-of-the-dealer-promo-model/

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, December 18, 2019 8:54 AM

Hey Upsjuan:

     You know you could be on to something. Back in the day when they weren't fashionable I bought my first Rambler American after building a model of the 65 .Neat, Clean and of Course Underpowered .

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Lamarque,Texas
Posted by uspsjuan on Wednesday, December 18, 2019 7:36 AM
That might have been before the bean counters found out they could make a few extra dollars from the model manufactures for using their cars. Honestly, how much could the auto makers be getting for those rights? Do they not realize that if they forgo that money, the cost of kits goes down and more kids might try building them and thusly brand loyalty is born. Next thing you know is that kid is buying a new car because that's what he built as a kid!
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Sunday, December 15, 2019 12:05 PM

I think back in the day when Revell and Monogram, and to a lesser extent AMT and MPC mainly did car kits, they probably had some sort of deal going with the Big Three automakers regarding kits of new cars. Back in the day, there was almost a new car kit for every model year of some of the more popular cars.

Tamiya was likely left out during this time because they mainly did motorized kits and military.

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Thursday, December 12, 2019 12:54 PM

Hi,Upsjuan:

  Hey ! Building Cardstock models isn't that hard. all you need is lots of patience and a good glue like Aleen's Craft glue. It's more forgiving and doesn't leave the water-spots Elmer"s does. Remember in cardstock you have lots of Bends, Folds and Curling to do.

    Also a good pair of very pointy and sharp scissors and plenty of sharp X-Acto blades and a steel ruler, won't hurt!

 As far as P.E. I found that the Cardstock building, Helped me, learn how to do P.E. Better. Now after all that I can do heat shields on Model car engines with no problems.

 Then I took it to ships. The last time I ever used P.E. on a model car was on a 1/12 Model "T" I did the grill surround out of the brass left over from the brass trees from a Tank Model. Yes, I have used it, Love it, But have to watch my Budget.

 I have just been stubborn about spending a lot on Aftermarket in 1/25' I did Buy from the Company( Lindberg's Supplier) a full dozen sets of the Wire wheels from the 53 Ford kit. So see, I do it but rarely.

    What disapoints me most is that a lot of the Aftermarket( Both resin and P.E.) haven't made Generic ( For standard Autos) Wire Wheels. Have you ever seen a set? Except for Ferraris they are not common. I finally read an article in Scale Auto and had Gene help me, and Now using the plastic rims I create my own wires. More on that later. Happy Modeling.

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Lamarque,Texas
Posted by uspsjuan on Thursday, December 12, 2019 7:30 AM
Tank-builder , I commend you on your skills. To be able to change a kit to that extent is impressive , not to mention building a ship out of card stock . I tip my hat to you sir. Unfortunately my skills are nowhere near that., so I am left with paying the money for a quality kit and AM add ons. Although I am not one to buy the PE stuff as my skills bending and assembling it is getting better but not good enough to spend the big $ on it. As for the cost of the kit it self, well... I like to build big and I can afford it. LMAO Just my 2 Cents worth. Happy building!
  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Wednesday, December 11, 2019 2:40 PM

Hello;

    Now see! That is an engine that can displayed out of the car.  A better chance to see the work that way. Personally, what I meant in my comments is that I think there would be more if the Full engine /Opening Doors and Trunks issue wasn't so important. So you see it's not to me a neccesity. But m folks forget this extra stuff adds to the final price on the shelf

   After all, I have built long enough if I want it, I can do the openings myself. So ,for that reason if curbsides are there I could work from there. I had an M.P.C. car kit for years with opening hood. I didn't build it and still haven't. Why? Well, back then it had the wrong engine represented and Now that I have the right one, I put it in a Better vehicle.

      To those who say if you want it you will spend the bucks. Why? I build a lot of ship models and I have yet to spend that kind of money.$ 500.00 for the ship, plus $ 300.00 for aftermarket for an Iowa Class. No Way! 

     I would sooner build it at 1/200 scale out of Cardstock for $90.00 and add my own created details! This is one thing I have noticed in the hobby.Cost!

 

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Corpus Christi, Tx
Posted by mustang1989 on Monday, December 9, 2019 9:17 AM

uspsjuan
I for one would happily spend $50+ on a quality muscle car. Yes with a complete engine and drive train. I know you don't normally see these items, but I might choose to have the hood open or doors for that matter. If I can get a tank with full interior that has fantastic detail, why not a car? Most "gear heads" I know love to look at a nice engine. Kind of like showing an aircraft without the engine panels attached. Maybe if a manufacturer took a chance and gave us a high quality kit , John Q Public would snap it up even with an elevated price tag. Look at the cost of one of the latest 1/350 or 1/200 ships ! They are $150-400. And yes I have 2 of the 1/200 kits and waiting on the Titanic to be released. Happy building everyone!
 

The way it's set up now you CAN display a really nice engine/ engine bay right along with the interior. Most of Revell's and AMT's engines (notice I said most....some are down right horrible so yo u have to use some discretion) provide an excellent platform. The only things that need to be bought are stuff like a nice carburetor ( which is a failure item among ALL kit manufacturers), PE fans, PE throttle linkage, PE alternator and accessory drive brackets and spark plug wires to make a really nice looking engine. There's even aluminum pulleys along with rubber drive belts to dress them up even further.

This started life as a Revell Big Block and then I added the rocker covers from the AMT Baldwin Motion Camaro kit, a resin Holley 4 barrel from Fireball Resin and then all the PE stuff. Throttle return spring is from a 1:1 scale turn signal bulb filament.

                   

 

  • Member since
    August 2004
  • From: Lamarque,Texas
Posted by uspsjuan on Monday, December 9, 2019 7:42 AM
I for one would happily spend $50+ on a quality muscle car. Yes with a complete engine and drive train. I know you don't normally see these items, but I might choose to have the hood open or doors for that matter. If I can get a tank with full interior that has fantastic detail, why not a car? Most "gear heads" I know love to look at a nice engine. Kind of like showing an aircraft without the engine panels attached. Maybe if a manufacturer took a chance and gave us a high quality kit , John Q Public would snap it up even with an elevated price tag. Look at the cost of one of the latest 1/350 or 1/200 ships ! They are $150-400. And yes I have 2 of the 1/200 kits and waiting on the Titanic to be released. Happy building everyone!
  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Corpus Christi, Tx
Posted by mustang1989 on Sunday, December 8, 2019 8:52 PM

I've been thinking that we need a late model Cadillac CTS-V for a while now. It'd sure be nice if Tamiya were the one's that could produce it.

As far as cheap is concerned.....I see some of that but I also see alot of folks that are chunking out major bucks on resin kits and all the AM goodies that are now available in the automotive building world now. Cheap would not be a word I would assosiate with all of that stuff. I build aircraft AND autos and can tell you that I spend just as much, if not more, on automotive builds. I do understand that I am but one of the many auto modelers out there but can also say that anybody I've seen worth their salt as a builder is usually willing to spend a comparable amount of money to that of other genres. Just my observation.....

                   

 

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Sunday, December 8, 2019 11:35 AM

Lindberg's move into 1/20 scale was part of their downfall. Everyone was going to a constant scale, they jump ship into an offscale.

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Saturday, December 7, 2019 9:31 PM

cbaltrin

 

 
Rob Gronovius

 

 
Mr Mike

Tamiya did do the late '90s Ford Mustang GT Convertible many years ago.

 

 

 

They did a Jeep Grand Cherokee back in the 90s that was really nice. When they do a standard automobile model kit, they really put out a nice kit.

 

 

 

 

Wow, I wonder what the heck made them choose that subject...?

 

On the Grand Cherokee, that might have been driven by the Lindberg 1/20 offering and other SUV stuff of the era.

  • Member since
    May 2004
  • From: Land of Lakes
Posted by cbaltrin on Saturday, December 7, 2019 3:00 PM

Rob Gronovius

 

 
Mr Mike

Tamiya did do the late '90s Ford Mustang GT Convertible many years ago.

 

 

 

They did a Jeep Grand Cherokee back in the 90s that was really nice. When they do a standard automobile model kit, they really put out a nice kit.

 

 

Wow, I wonder what the heck made them choose that subject...?

On the Bench:

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  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Saturday, December 7, 2019 2:29 PM

Mr Mike

Tamiya did do the late '90s Ford Mustang GT Convertible many years ago.

 

They did a Jeep Grand Cherokee back in the 90s that was really nice. When they do a standard automobile model kit, they really put out a nice kit.

  • Member since
    January 2011
Posted by Bugatti Fan on Friday, December 6, 2019 11:58 AM

UK prices of kits are way above US  prices. The Tamiya Aston Martin retails here for between 45 and 50 pounds sterling, so you guys are quite lucky in the states.

Tamiya I doubt will ever go into American Muscle cars as they are looking at a world wide market. Unfortunately US muscle cars have less interest world wide than F1 cars and exotics. When will Tamiya bring out a Bugatti Veyron of Chiron is what I would like to see. I guess that the resurrected Revell US branch will still cater for the muscle car enthusiast. Also bear in mind that most US car subjects appear in 1/25 scale as opposed to the 1/24 scale favoured by European and Far East manufacturers.

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, December 6, 2019 11:47 AM

John;

    You know like many of us that there a lot of cars out there that deserve notice. The requirement of engines and opening doors isn't necessary,Really. Why, Well, It's nice to build a model car and not sweat stuff you don't normally see anyway. Curbsides are fine. Some of the better ones have been made as what I call Snappers.

     Great detail in the places that count.The body scripts and trim and dash details ,and it seems that Snappers seem to have better molded steering wheels and other stuff. 

 As to engine detail, well, the bottom plates will certainly make better detail painters of those who build them.

  • Member since
    December 2019
Posted by Munkyslut on Friday, December 6, 2019 5:19 AM
I hear you on the price thing, but for us Englanders cheap 20-25 dollar kits just don’t exist. The last nice Revell 1/25 I got my hands on was the 68 Charger R/T, that’s a good product but probably the only true US muscle we get. Choice & value are huge in the States compared to Europe, you are lucky!
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, December 6, 2019 1:19 AM

Thrifty is the term I'd use ;)  Interesting though because many of the models today are the same kits - though round 2 has greatly improved many.  So recalling purchasing a kit in 1979 and buying the same kit now for $30 must jar some memory issues.  Particularly when it may be the same old AMT kit with flash and fit issues.  But hey - you don't have to buy it!

I think the spirit of the thread is let's see a really good quality manufacturer produce some of the classic American muscle car kits.  Revell is listening - the 67 Charger and Bronco are great kits (beats the dead horse) 

Thanks,

John

Ain't no reason to hang my head, I could wake up in the mornin' dead 

  • Member since
    September 2015
  • From: The Redwood Empire
Posted by Aaronw on Friday, December 6, 2019 1:08 AM

Not to be rude but many car modelers are just plain cheap, and particularly classic American car modelers. If you spend anytime at all at a model car site you will be regaled with tales of $1.89 model kits, and what a rip off that kits cost $25 now.

Of course some will spend the money, and when you get into non-US cars, big rigs, sports cars and race cars many of those builders are quite willing to spend money (notice a fair bit of overlap with the automotive subjects the Japanese companies do offer).

There is no shortage of price gripes in other modelling genres, but after spending years on model car sites and other model sites, the difference in the volume of price complaining is quite noticable. 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, December 6, 2019 12:51 AM

They did do the new GT.  Looks to be 30-40 poking around.  Revell and Revell Germany also did the new GT which looks to run 25-30 so the price question is valid.  I have heard good things about these kits - Revell Germany being a bit better according to the latest Scale Auto.

 

Maybe I'll order both and do a side by side.  One of them is on my xmas list :)

 

Thanks,

John

Ain't no reason to hang my head, I could wake up in the mornin' dead 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Thursday, December 5, 2019 11:20 PM

Maybe Tamiya will do the new mid engine Corvette.  That would fit in with their current line up.  Didn’t they do the new GT-40?

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