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1/144 Scale Spartan 7W Executive by R&R Modelers

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  • Member since
    March 2012
1/144 Scale Spartan 7W Executive by R&R Modelers
Posted by Rdutnell on Friday, June 6, 2014 9:02 PM

Greetings Everybody!

My name is Russ, of R&R Modelers, a friendship and collaboration between two modelers, Ron and I, to make realistic small scale aircraft model displays, for our own enjoyment.  We have posted some of our projects (at various phases of completion) on this forum and they may be seen at:

http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/48/t/158982.aspx

http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/48/t/159017.aspx

http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/48/t/159041.aspx

This thread shows the 1/144 Scale Spartan 7W Executive.  The Spartan 7W Executive was produced during the depression of the late 1930s and early 1940s, and included several trend-setting features such as retractable undercarriage and an all metal structure, and was far ahead of its time – in performance, in appearance, and in luxury. The Spartan 7W Executive, was the brainchild of William G. Skelly, of Skelly Oil, and was a showstopper.  Designed for wealthy clientele, specifically rich oil executives who wanted speed, comfort, and luxury, and were willing to pay for it, the Executive 7W was spacious and featured 18 in (46 cm) of slide-back seat room for front-seat passengers, arm rests, ash trays, dome lighting, deep cushions, cabin heaters, ventilators, extensive soundproofing, large windows, and interior access to the 100 lb (45 kg) capacity luggage compartment.  Only 34 were produced and over half remain airworthy.

The model was designed using AutoCad, and plans found on-line.  The image below shows the fuselage sections I traced, making closed polylines,  which I then moved to the proper location on the plan view of the airplane and rotated them 90 degrees.

 

The image below shows it after I lofted the polylines together to make a solid.


The image below shows the wing under construction using the same procedure…

 

…And the procedure shows the stabilizer.

The image below shows it with the wings and the stabilizer, before I mirrored the stabilizer to the other side.


The next 2 images show the airframe after I used the Union Command to join the airframe, wings, stabilizer and tail.  Note that I have also “etched” the control surfaces.

 

The next thing I did was make the main landing gear.  I made them both extended…


…And retracted.


Next I cut out the glass portions of the cockpit creating separate parts out of them.  These parts, shown in blue below, will be “printed” in clear plastic.  Note that I also made the rear gear.


The image below shows windows and windshield part separated from the airframe.

 

Because I intended to make an interior for the model, the next thing I did was slice up the airframe to make the port side of the cabin a separate piece.  I also cut a hole out of the port side piece for the door.

 


I made the door a separate piece in case the modeler wanted to display it open.


Next, I made the propeller, which I modified slightly from one I had made before.

 

 

I had to add the exhaust pipes on the underside.

 


Next, I made seats, the instrument panel and control stick.


I added pedals to the deck and magazine holders to the backs of the seats.  Not many will know they are there, but the builder will.

 


Next, I made connection points for the interior parts…

 

…With mating parts on the deck on the interior of the airframe.

 

Next, I detailed the instrument panel.  The image below shows the layout I made, based on pictures.

 

The images below show the completed instrument panel.

For a reminder of how small it is... 

 

The image below shows the completed model “exploded” showing the individual parts.

 

The image below shows the parts that make up the kit.

 

I also made a decal sheet for it.  It is designed for printing at 25%.

The image below shows it with the decals applied (sort of).


With the model completed, I uploaded it to Click2Detail (C2D), who offers them for sale:

https://www.click2detail.com/store/p170/1%3A144_Spartan_7W_Executive.html

To Be Continued…

  • Member since
    October 2005
  • From: New Port Richey
Posted by deattilio on Saturday, June 7, 2014 10:40 AM

Very interesting, I graduated from Spartan so looks like the wallet is being forcibly pried open again.

 

WIP:
Trying to get my hobby stuff sorted - just moved and still unpacking.

 

"Gator, Green Catskill....Charlie On Time"
 

 

  • Member since
    March 2012
Posted by Rdutnell on Sunday, June 8, 2014 7:11 AM

Greetings Everyone! 

And sorry deattilio!  I know the feeling, but I think you will like the model.  I haven’t seen one yet, but Ron got his and has started building it.  He has sent me some pictures of it in progress.

The first set of pictures were sent after he had sanded and primed the model exterior and painted the interior.  You can see the magic Ron is working on the model and the detailing of the instrument panel.  This is really exciting, because this was the first time I ever tried doing an instrument panel and I really didn’t know how it would turn out.  I’m not exactly sure what Ron did, but whatever he did, I like it.

 

 

Ron sent me the next set of pictures after he had assembled the interior and enclosed it.

 

Ron uses an interesting technique, which I had never seen before I met Ron, but you guys are probably familiar with.  He uses foil on the airframe.  The first time I had seen it was on the Luscombe:

(http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/48/t/158982.aspx).

He did the same thing on the Spartan, except that he used two different types of foil.  The next picture he sent was after he had applied the matte foil to the control surfaces.


A short time later he sent me pictures of the model with the shiny foil applied to the remaining parts.  He told me at this point that he was embarrassed by it, but I think it looks pretty darn good…

 

…Especially when you consider how small the model is.  The picture below shows the Spartan in another of Ron’s projects, a really cool hangar.  The penny shows the scale.


To be continued…

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Central Nebraska
Posted by freem on Monday, June 16, 2014 7:49 PM

That is way cool.

Chris Christenson

 

  • Member since
    March 2012
Posted by Rdutnell on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 3:53 PM

Hi Everybody, and thanks Chris!

Ron has the finished the Spartan Executive and sent me some pictures of the completed model.  They are so cool I had to post them.  Ron is truly a master model builder as you can see.  The decals were printed by Yuuichi Kurakami.

                       

  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Montana USA
Posted by heepey on Friday, September 19, 2014 8:50 PM

WOW!

  • Member since
    April 2014
Posted by B_one fixer on Saturday, September 20, 2014 7:35 PM

Very nice! I would loose my mind working on something so small.

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