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Building " Paper Models " Pt.2

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  • Member since
    August, 2008
Building " Paper Models " Pt.2
Posted by tankerbuilder on Friday, December 19, 2014 12:35 PM

Well; I have been told better late than never so here goes .

           In the first post I spoke of ease of assembly on these things . I also stated how simple the tool list was , I think . The tool list

1 - One fine pointed medium sized pair of scissors.

2- One pair of stainless cuticle scissors.

3 - One pair of stamp or regular sized tweezers and one pair of it's very pointy cousin !

4 - One medium , or large bottle of Elmers OR Aleens craft Glue . Aleens is better than the other product    but the other product Can be used , but , carefully  . More so than the Aleens .  ( has to do with thickness .)

5 - One well lit work area and some form of straight-edge for cutting and folding .

6 - The courage to try something totally different .

    You see , in paper - modeling you cut out and assemble your parts and from those flat pieces you roll the paper into , gun barrels , masts , prop shafts , cable reels etc . So you have to do it all . As you build , if you want to paint or weather then  spray craft clear , on , say your fuselage and then paint the paper and or weather it .After spraying the craft clear you can do anything  , including the old firecracker thing if you are so inclined .

    You know , the funny thing , I have never exploded any model or sunk it with BBs . I guess they were to " Dear " as was said in the old days . Alluding to price . I mean in plastic ,a whole dollar for a model car .You must be crazy ! That's to dear !

     Paper modeling has opened up a whole era and collection of ships and planes for me .Whoda Thunk you could do dis in paper ! I built a Tirpitz in paper and was so lucky it came out really nice , a neighbor bought it from me , He liked it that much . This can be you . Simple geometric and plain shapes .Plus you learn about the really neat properties of card- stock which also can be used for scratch - building to add to your plastic or resin model .Think about it .

     If you have any problems , then please E-Mail me at the message site adjascent to our site here . Good Luck and Great Modeling ! !        Tanker - Builder

 

  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: Central Cal
Posted by mhvink on Friday, December 19, 2014 5:37 PM

Another nice thing about paper modeling is that since the files are on your computer, it is easy to modify the drawing files in Photoshop to change the markings on the model.  Different squadron markings, back-dating, etc.  You can also resize the model to any scale you desire (within reason).  There is a paper model designer out there that created an Apollo Command Module in 1/12 scale that would blow your mind.  Another designer created a 1/24th Lunar Module with complete interior so you can leave the skin off.

Positives are 1, Much lower cost (many are free) 2, If you make a mistake, just reprint the offending part and go again.  3, You can find or design nearly anything you want - not just aircraft or armor.  I have designed a few free kits myself.  It isn't hard to do.

Negatives?  It's paper!  It is difficult to make compound curves and it can be VERY fragile and delicate.

It is truly amazing and does open up a new world.

Mike

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 12:37 PM

Mike .

    There are ways to do special shapes. Elswhere I mentioned yanking a spoon from a grilling set .Yup ! wetting the part and letting it take the spoon,s curves . Then handle it when dry only .Use the area you need , mount it and then spray it with clear craft  overcoat .

  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: Central Cal
Posted by mhvink on Thursday, February 12, 2015 1:11 AM

Agreed!  I never said that it couldn't be done, just that it was difficult.  But those are some of the challenges that make this medium fun.

And you will notice in my list above that the positives outweighed the negatives.

Mike

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Monday, February 16, 2015 12:53 PM

Yeah :

   And this is to important to ignore .This medium is FUN !

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, February 16, 2015 2:13 PM

Hello!

Paper models let you do subject that couldn't be done in plastic because the production run would be too short - some paper models are printed like 300 times. Agreed, there are challenges when building them - but once you master those, your whole model-building gets better! Example would be looking for parts/assemblies being straight and at the right angles to each other. Get the habit of chacking that and your plastic models will get better too.

Thanks for reading and have a nice day!

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    September, 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Thursday, February 19, 2015 8:07 AM

I love the variety of kits available in paper. For example, I've built most of the German WWI battlecruiser force.  These kits look great, and they are fun!  There are many kits available for sailing ship enthusiasts, many more than in plastic!   I also love the fact that I can rescale them from the larger 1/200 and 1/250 scales to 1/350 to better fit into my collection.  There are also after-market products available  for detailing, including brass gun barrels and photo-etch sets.  Other advantages have been covered above.

I sincerely recommend that anyone try these kits!

Bill

  • Member since
    August, 2008
Posted by tankerbuilder on Monday, March 02, 2015 2:38 PM

Bill ;

 Glad you like them . I have found out though , the bigger the ship , you have to do some engineering to keep the brass gun-barrels from sagging ! .

  • Member since
    January, 2010
Posted by CrashTestDummy on Wednesday, March 30, 2016 3:26 PM

This may be a stupid question, but I have to ask.  With 'kits' you purchase as electronic copies, when you go to print them, what paper do you use?  I mean, what paper works best?  I have a couple of these I'd like to print and try, but am concerned that standard printer paper might not work right.  thanks.

Gene Beaird,
Pearland, Texas

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, March 30, 2016 3:56 PM

Hi[

 I usually use the heavier paper. Which is halfway between a regular piece of typwriter paper and a business card. This ia preferable . T.B.

  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: Central Cal
Posted by mhvink on Friday, April 01, 2016 12:30 PM

Hi Gene,

I normally use 65lb bond paper (110lb is card stock).  You can get it at Office Depot, Michaels, HobbyLobby, even at some Walmarts.  This paper will actually go through your home printer with little difficulty.  Kind of like when your printer grabs 3 sheets of regular paper at a time.  If you are still concerned, you can go to Kinko's to have the file printed, but you may need to bring your receipt for the file since they are hesitant to print copyrighted materials.

Keep on modeling,

 

Mike Vink

Fresno, CA.

  • Member since
    January, 2010
Posted by CrashTestDummy on Friday, April 01, 2016 1:51 PM

Thanks for the replies.  We have a couple of color inkjets that will do photos, so they should  handle 65 lb.  I know my wife prints card stock through her Kodak printer. 

I was also planning on trying the back of some of her craft paper.  Some of that paper has a white back side, and I'm thinking the semi-gloss finish might be a nice surface.  We'll see. 

Gene Beaird,
Pearland, Texas

  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: Central Cal
Posted by mhvink on Friday, April 01, 2016 3:04 PM

Careful though, the gloss finish might not take to water-based glues (White PVA glue) very well.  Try a test piece first.

Mike

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Sunday, April 10, 2016 8:08 AM

Gene;

   Be careful with that ! I have found that if you use it , the semi-gloss or gloss finish sticks ,but doesn't let the underlying material to get glue in to it's pores . That's the simplest way I could explain it .Sorry if it sounds dumb !  T.B.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by seastallion53 on Sunday, April 17, 2016 4:35 PM

would you not want to use a water based glue since it will wrinkle the paper?I use UHU glue and it works real good.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Monday, April 18, 2016 11:33 AM

S.S.53 ;

Water based glue isn't the problem. This is . If you use slick surface paper , the glue doesn't sem to penetrate well and you get peel off concerning the paper layers ! T.B.

     

  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: Central Cal
Posted by mhvink on Monday, April 18, 2016 12:07 PM

Yes, the only real way to glue glossy paper is to use a tab on the BACK side of the page to glue both ends together.   ----_----  Like this.  But, you will need to "over-roll" the parts, so a seam will not rise at the joint.  

Mike

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, April 21, 2016 7:38 AM

Mike ;

   You are so correct !

 This is something in classes I've taught that comes up a lot, .You can do a lot , But sometimes you have to do something extra to get it right ! I found this to be true on aircraft especially !     T.B.

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