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New Paper Modeler - Need Help

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  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Friday, December 25, 2020 7:46 AM

Hi! 

Welcome to the Wide, Wide world of Paper-Modeling! I get my cardboard from two sources.The local donut shop.  Not Dunkin! Only the box tops( no greasy spots there! When I need a lot like my present project the Andrea Doria, I buy it at Office Depot. I use the cream colored card stock file folders.

 Follow pawel's instructions and you'll be good to go.I use Aleens Sticky Glue( Clear) Now.It deforms the paper not at all if you use it sparingly. Regular Aleens, like Elmers seems to have to much water in it!

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Friday, December 25, 2020 5:09 AM

Space Ranger - you can buy it in art supply stores and the likes, but I like to recycle - because cardboard is everywhere around us, you just need to keep your eyes open. All those boxes, packaging materials and lots of the stuff normal people just waste. How about the backs of old calenders - many of them have nice, large format cardboard backs. Blocks of drawing paper have them too. In the old communist times shoe cartons were a popular source in Poland.

If you have good glue, you have the option to glue two layers of thiner cardboard together getting the desired thickness. For thinner stuff there are various advertising material often printed on surprisingly good paper.

So it's really a question of awareness - and I'm sure you can find something suitable that's already been paid!

Good hunting and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    January 2020
Posted by Space Ranger on Friday, December 25, 2020 1:42 AM

Pawel: Where does one find cardboard in varying thicknesses?

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Friday, December 25, 2020 1:15 AM

Chad - I don't know the Dewotine kit - maybe you could post some pictures of the parts? Other than that I know that Bf-110 and I have a good idea about that Su. Both models are not very hard, but I wouldn't quite recommend them as a first paper model. The Bf-110 would probable be OK if you built it without the cabin interior. On the Su the tracks are probably a lot of work. This is all no problem in case of a modeller who works slowly but steadily, thinks ahead and has experience with other type of models.

Having said that, I'd probably recommend the Dewotine or the Bf-110.

Hope it helps - have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Thursday, December 24, 2020 7:08 PM

Pawel - Which one do you think would be the best one to start with?

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/72 Revell He177 & 1/35 Tamiya Sdkfz 251

On deck: 1/35 Bronco LWS

In the hole: 1/144 Revell S-100

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Thursday, December 24, 2020 7:02 PM

Philo - with all due respect, nice 1mm cardboard works better for this!

Chad - how about a little WIP with photos? Good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Thursday, December 24, 2020 6:11 PM

Thanks Phil!  I definitely feel like I can do this if I go nice and slow. 

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/72 Revell He177 & 1/35 Tamiya Sdkfz 251

On deck: 1/35 Bronco LWS

In the hole: 1/144 Revell S-100

  • Member since
    March 2005
Posted by philo426 on Thursday, December 24, 2020 5:55 PM

I use 1/16 inch basswood!

  • Member since
    April 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Thursday, December 24, 2020 5:49 PM

Pawel, I was really hoping you would see this post!  It helps so much!  Thank you my friend!

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/72 Revell He177 & 1/35 Tamiya Sdkfz 251

On deck: 1/35 Bronco LWS

In the hole: 1/144 Revell S-100

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Thursday, December 24, 2020 5:23 PM

Hello Chad!

I see you got some nice, quality Polish paper models - I'm sure you'll have a lot of fun with them - and I would be glad to help you whenever you feel like writing - in this thread or a PM.

I even have the first one completed - ulnuckily no photos, and I gave the model away as a gift to a friend.

Now generally the best method of reinforcing parts with cardboard is to cut them out coarse (meaning leaving a few millimeters of unprinted paper around the actual outline of the part), then applying glue - spray type glue works great here. White glue can be used too, but there are some types of white glue that distort the paper part when applied on the whole surface - those should be avoided. Then you glue the part on the cardboard of the right thickness and let the glue dry throughly. When the glue is not fully dry you will notice the reinforced part is somehow "funny" to cut, gummy or spongy. This goes away when everything is dry. Then you cut the part out "fine" - exactly on the line. Tight corners are best done with a sharp knife and not with scissors. The inner corners and the gun cutout on the part you posted are places where a nice break-away type knife will really come in handy. Use that break-away feature often and always have a sharp point at hand - you can gae a much better quality model this way.

Please note that the part you have shown and generally the overwhelming majority of parts that need to be reinforced with cardboard don't need to be folded. The dotted lines in your example are just locations showing where other reinforced parts will connect.

By the way - the inscription in the lower portion of the part tell you to sand the part a little to form an edge ("szlifować" means "to sand" in Polish).

The slots in parts "W-14" and "W-15" are also best done with a sharp knife. Don't worry and cut the base of the slot with a cut a little wider than the slot itself - makes for an easy work and doesn't make the part significantly weaker.

One more thing - the bulkhead somehow almost always have a tendency to be a little too big. Before glueing check them for fit with the outer skins and sand down the edges a little bit to make them fit.

I hope this helps - if you have any more questions, please don't hesitate to ask. good luck with your build and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    April 2015
New Paper Modeler - Need Help
Posted by Mopar Madness on Thursday, December 24, 2020 4:03 PM

Hello friends. I have purchased a few paper models.  I've dabbled with a few patterns printed on basic copy paper and want to try some thing a little more advanced. My question is regarding to the second image below. The translation from Polish to English is "Stick it on 0.5 mm cardboard."  Does this mean I cut out the part from the instructions, trace it on card stock, then cut it out of the 0.5 mm card stock? How do I transpose the fold lines too so I know exactly where to score and fold the 0.5 mm card stock after I cut it out?

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/72 Revell He177 & 1/35 Tamiya Sdkfz 251

On deck: 1/35 Bronco LWS

In the hole: 1/144 Revell S-100

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