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Revell North Cormorant oil platform - Should I prime?

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dlh
  • Member since
    March, 2017
Revell North Cormorant oil platform - Should I prime?
Posted by dlh on Thursday, November 02, 2017 10:04 AM

I'm just getting started on this giant.  I've read some threads here and a good one on Britmodeler.  I'm undecided about priming, and maybe losing detail.  The kit parts are molded close to the colors they will be, and most exposed parts with be flat finishes.  I'll be using MM enamels.

What's your opinion on wether this needs priming or not.  I'm thinking not.

Thanks,

Dave

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Thursday, November 02, 2017 1:17 PM

Generally, I like to prime everything, because it gives a good surface for your color coat to "stick" to, as well as filling in small imperfections such as light scratches.

I have found no loss of detail when using something like Tamiya Fine Scale primer or other "fine" primers, such as Mr. Surfacer.  Just don't use hardware store primers.

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

dlh
  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by dlh on Thursday, November 02, 2017 1:24 PM

Cadet Chuck

Generally, I like to prime everything, because it gives a good surface for your color coat to "stick" to, as well as filling in small imperfections such as light scratches.

I have found no loss of detail when using something like Tamiya Fine Scale primer or other "fine" primers, such as Mr. Surfacer.  Just don't use hardware store primers.

 

Thanks. I use Tamiya Fine Scale primer now.

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, November 02, 2017 6:49 PM

Tamiya white.

  • Member since
    February, 2006
  • From: Boston
Posted by Wilbur Wright on Thursday, November 02, 2017 11:31 PM

There is no need to prime if you are using flat MM  enamels.  That is your primer.  If you see anything rough after first coat you can sand and then go back and hit it again with the same color.

I have this big kit. It should be a lot of fun.  GMM makes 1/200th P/E railings if you're interested.

If I were going to build this kit  I would prime with MM enamels then use Tamiya acrylic for the yellow, rust red color , and gray. In order to weather with oils.  The Tamiya is completely resistant to oil wash weathering.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, November 03, 2017 9:15 AM

Hi;

 I second Bill on this one . Use Tamiya White . T.B. After Prepping I have used Clear Semi Gloss or Flat as a primer and finish coat over colored plastic parts if they were close to the color needed .Weathering will solve  any of the problems .

dlh
  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by dlh on Friday, November 03, 2017 9:25 AM

Wilbur Wright

There is no need to prime if you are using flat MM  enamels.  That is your primer.  If you see anything rough after first coat you can sand and then go back and hit it again with the same color.

I have this big kit. It should be a lot of fun.  GMM makes 1/200th P/E railings if you're interested.

If I were going to build this kit  I would prime with MM enamels then use Tamiya acrylic for the yellow, rust red color , and gray. In order to weather with oils.  The Tamiya is completely resistant to oil wash weathering.

 

Thanks.  I already have the P/E railings.  Probably was your suggestion. I'm still undecided on priming, but we agree on flat enamels being the primer.  I've read a lot about priming and it seems people are about 50/50 on priming or not priming.  At this point, I'm going to use flat enamels and weather (wash) with Vellejo acrylics; already have those too with all of their pigment powders and media.

Thanks for your time.

Keep the replies coming.

Dave

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, November 03, 2017 10:56 AM

I think it's helpful to put on finish coats over a base color that is contrasted. In fact, I really dislike kits that attempt to cast the plastic in a version of the finish color.

As far as using the finish enamel as a primer, all well and good except that it means more paint color setups and changes. 

dlh
  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by dlh on Friday, November 03, 2017 11:04 AM

GMorrison

I think it's helpful to put on finish coats over a base color that is contrasted. In fact, I really dislike kits that attempt to cast the plastic in a version of the finish color.

As far as using the finish enamel as a primer, all well and good except that it means more paint color setups and changes. 

 

Understood.  Fortunately or unfortunately this kit is molded in colors close to the finished colors.  I might prime the larger pieces that I had to clean up and skip the primer on others.  I'm first going to compare small corrugated metal walls, one primered and one not.  I'm also going to compare pieces of railing that way.  I think the railings look too "thick".  So I might, as I mentioned, go all P/E on the railings.

Thanks, just the kind of feedback I need.

Dave

  • Member since
    February, 2006
  • From: Boston
Posted by Wilbur Wright on Saturday, November 04, 2017 6:36 PM

You might try the black basing technique on some of the bigger structures.  These platforms take a real weather beating out on the open sea.

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