SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Ships of Jutland in Plastic

364 views
17 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Ships of Jutland in Plastic
Posted by ridleusmc on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 11:34 AM

I was very happy when I opened my latest mailer/catalogue from Squadron.  Right there on page 3, is the new Hobby Boss 1/350 German battlecruiser SMS Seydlitz.  Here it is from squadron,

https://www.squadron.com/HobbyBoss-1-350-SMS-Seydlitz-HY86510-p/hy86510.htm

I know ICM has produced kits of the battleships Konig, Kronprinz, Grober Kurfurst, and Markgraf. 

It's good to see more plastic kits coming from the Dreadnough era and Jutland.  I hope to see some Royal Navy battleships and battlecruisers at some point.  It'd be great to see Beatty's flagship HMS Lion, Jelicoe's flagship HMS Iron Duke or the HMS Queen Mary.  

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Meridian, ID
Posted by modelcrazy on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 11:40 AM

Yeah it seems the pre-Dreadnaught ships are getting popular. I don't have room of those as well as all the 1/350 WW2 ships I have but would't mind getting one or two.

ON THE BENCH

1/25 Monogram 57 Chevy Bel Air
1/144 Trumpeter Kawanishi H6K5-L Mavis

Completing a kit is like cutting the head off a Hydra. Two more replace it in the stash.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 11:58 AM

I believe someone makes the Queen Mary in its WW1 form, at least in 1:700.  I intend to pick up that kit one of these days.

And I love those pre-dreadnaught ships!  I have the Lord Nelson in my queue, and it will go on my bench in about a month or two.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 12:01 PM

I'm getting out of 1/350 for reasons I can erxplain, but it's pretty nice to see these.

The Grand Fleet is pretty woefully underserved in plastic still. A Lion would be nice.

Combrig makes them all AFAIK in resin.

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 12:05 PM

And apropos of nothing, most all of the ships in the battle were dreadnaughts, super dreadnaughts, or cruisers and smaller.

 

  • Member since
    September, 2013
Posted by Marcus McBean on Tuesday, November 07, 2017 4:16 PM

GMorrison

And apropos of nothing, most all of the ships in the battle were dreadnaughts, super dreadnaughts, or cruisers and smaller.

You forgot the new squadron of Queen Elizabeth class battleships with 15" guns that came up late afternoon and should have trap the German fleet. 

I would like to see more destroyer kits, those ships on both sides really prevented the other side from closing on the wounded ships and had a large impact on the battle.

GMorrison, I just saw your other post.  I hope you are doing better.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 2:04 PM

Hi ;

 Now you can understand my messing with Paper Models . I have a KronPrinz in 1/200 . I am using it as patterns to build a plastic one from scratch . I just installed the main deck the other day .

 Gun Barrels were easy , either the paper or brass ones . I use brass thick wall Tubing and tapered and stepped it on my lathe ( A Dremel in a bracket , with a homeade tailstock ! ) And it's the first multi  - speed model they made .

 Hey ! don't laugh ,That Dremel is probably one of the oldest Dremels I have . At least thirty !

  • Member since
    April, 2005
Posted by ddp59 on Wednesday, November 08, 2017 6:47 PM

Tanker - Builder, my dremel predates yours as it is about 40yrs old & 1 speed, 28,000rpm. had to wait another christmas til i got an external speed control.

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posted by ridleusmc on Thursday, November 09, 2017 7:06 AM

I have to say that building a ship from scratch using a paper model template is pretty darn awesome.  Building a lathe from a Dremel and a scratch tailstock is pretty cool too.  

 

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posted by ridleusmc on Thursday, November 09, 2017 7:09 AM

Marcus McBean
I would like to see more destroyer kits, those ships on both sides really prevented the other side from closing on the wounded ships and had a large impact on the battle.

 

Yes, the world needs more destroyers, from all eras.  I had to google period destroyers to get an idea of how they looked.  They're pretty sleek looking little ships.  They'd definately make for an interesting model.  

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, November 09, 2017 7:16 AM

ddp59;

    What I did there was use a speed control from a portable sewing machine ! I still have the old beast . I use it for parts . OH ! Even the multi-speed one can be controlled this way .

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, November 09, 2017 7:20 AM

Ridle USMC;

     The tailstock was easy . I took apart an old but very useable drill and used the chuck assembly , a roller skate bearing and a bracket made from a piece of scrap steel . I copied a drawing from a lathe company .The one in their ad .

      This way I can do larger stuff , But I usually don't . I thought about a rechargeable drill to replace the Dremel because of chuck size . Naw ! I really don't need anything bigger .

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, November 09, 2017 9:01 AM

ridleusmc

I have to say that building a ship from scratch using a paper model template is pretty darn awesome.  Building a lathe from a Dremel and a scratch tailstock is pretty cool too.  

 

 

Hey, that was my first lathe!  No tailstock though.  I was scratchbuilding a sailing frigate and needed a way to taper spars.  I made the ways from wood and strapped the dremel down to them, with a follower rest that allowed me to sand and file taper on dowel stock.

Then, my second was built from metal using an article from an old forties Mechanics Illustrated magazine. It used angle iron for the bed ways, and the headstock was to bearing pillow blocks mounted to a block of aluminum.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2005
Posted by ddp59 on Thursday, November 09, 2017 10:24 AM
  • Member since
    May, 2017
  • From: ohio I want to leave
Posted by armor 2.0 on Thursday, November 09, 2017 11:11 AM

ddp59

how does it preform I have been looking at that a little afraid of it because 1 it's from China and the cheap price get what you pay for saying I also assume getting replacement parts would be next to impossible .Can you give me some feedback.

Thankyou

  • Member since
    April, 2005
Posted by ddp59 on Thursday, November 09, 2017 1:44 PM

the only reason i bought something like this was for the non-wood lathe capability & the milling machine. can get the parts from china. my version runs off a 12v power adapter similar to laptop but there is 14v versions too. as i haven't used a lathe in over 40yrs since grade 9 or 10 so i have a bit of learning curve on the use of it. there is no speed control on it but has dual size pulley on the 3 jaw chuck to change the speed by i presume a slight configuation change in the chuck drive height. it will cut plastic but have not tried other materials yet.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, November 10, 2017 8:22 AM

Hi;

    I have to inject something here . My first compressor was " Made in China " . Date of reciept was Aug . 1968 . Guess what ? using it properly , it has lasted all these years with regular maintenance .This is something we home Hobbyists and craftsmen and women seem to forget . You have to maintain them properly and THAT more than anything else will extend their life .

 I have an Airless Paint Sprayer , It too is " Made In China " Bought it off a T.V. AD back in the seventies . Still works good too ! My oldest tool is a now Defunct " Soiux 7-1/4 inch saw with Furniture foot  ". The furniture foot was and is made of Magnesium .Wow  ! a High tech part on a saw .For using on Formica and Corian . Remember ,The foot is scratchless ! Still is .

   All kidding aside though I have a fifty year old Badger that still does a good squirt when I need it too . It has had only one needle and needle reciever change in all these years . I change the " O " rings yearly .

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Friday, November 10, 2017 8:24 AM

Yeah ! 

 But you see , I don't use a lathe that much  ,so I sold the big one years ago . I thought about this one but passed . Because I had sold my  " Gorilla in the Room " I figured I didn't need one on the bench . 

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

SUBSCRIBER-ONLY CONTENT
FREE NEWSLETTER